PAGENO="0001" EAST-WEST TRADE HEARINGS BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL FINANCE OF THE COMMITTEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY UNITED STATES SENATE NINETIETH CONGRESS SECOND SESSION ON Senate Joint Resolution 169 CONCERNING EAST-WEST TRADE PART 2 JUNE 4, 13, 27; JULY 17, 24, AND 25, 1968 Includes statements and material submitted by Members of Congress and Government agencies Printed for the use of the Committee on Banking and Currency 0 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 97-627 WASHINGTON : 1968 For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2.50 PAGENO="0002" COMMITTEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY JOHN SPARKMAN, Alabama, Chairman WILLIAM PROXMIRE, Wisconsin WALLACE F. BENNETT, Utah HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, Ja., New Jersey JOHN G. TOWER, Texas EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine BOURKE B. HICKENLOOPER, Iowa EDWARD V. LONG, Missouri EDWARD W. BROOKE, Massachusetts THOMAS J. McINTYRE, New Hampshire CHARLES H. PERCY, Illinois WALTER F. MONDALE, Minnesota GALE W. McGEE, Wyoming WILLIAM B. SPONG, Ja., Virginia LEWIS G. ODoia, Jr., staff Director and General Counsel JOHN R. EVANS, Minority staff Director HucH H. SMITH, Jr., Assi8t ant Counsel SUBCOMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL FINANCE EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine, Chairman JOHN SPARKMAN, Alabama BOURKE B. HICKENLOOPER, Iowa HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, JR., New Jersey JOhN G. TOWER, Texas WALTER F. MONDALE, Minnesota CHARLES H.PERCY, Illinois GALE W. McGEE, Wyoming WILLIAM B. SPONG, Ja., Virginia (II) PAGENO="0003" CONTENTS (The same table of contents appears in parts 1, 2, and 3) Page Senate Joint Resolution 169 2 CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF WITNESSES TUESDAY, JUNE 4 Strom Thurmond, U.S. Senator from the State of South Carolina 4 Walter F. Mondale, U.S. Senator from the State of Minnesota 20 George W. Ball, permanent Representative-designate to the United Nations 29 Philip H. Trezise, Ambassador to the Organization of Economic Coopera- tion and Development; accompanied by Robert B. Wright, Director, Office of East-West Trade, Department of State 45 THURSDAY, JUNE 13 Harold F. Linder, President and Chairman, Export-Import Bank of the United States; accompanied by B. Jenkins Middleton, vice president, Warren W. Glick, assistant general counsel and J. Hugh McFadden, staff member 127 Hugh P. Donaghue, assistant to the president, Control Data Corp 149 William Edgerton, Indiana University, on behalf of the Friends Service Committee on National Legislation 162 William A. Dymsza, research director, International Business Institute, Rutgers University 173 Herman Edelsberg, director, International Council, B'nai B'rith; accom- panied by David A. Brody, Washington representative of the Anti- defamation League 183 THURSDAY, JUNE 27 Lawrence C. McQuade, Assistant Secretary for Domestic and International Business, Department of Commerce 193 Prof. Isaiah Frank, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University 234 Prof. Harold J. Berman, professor of law, Harvard University 240 Randal Cornell Teague, director of regional and State activities, Young Americans for Freedom, Inc 256 W. B. Hicks, Jr., executive secretary, Liberty Lobby; accompanied by Michael Jaffe, general counsel 279 WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 A. R. Fredriksen, Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co 296 Robert V. Roosa, partner, Brown Bros., Harriman & Co 306 Paul G. Zerby, Dorsey, Marquart, W indhorst, West, & Halladay, Minne- apolis, Minn 324 J. W/ iley Perry, Jr., chairman, Import Study Committee, Cast Iron Soil Institute 327 WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 Edwin 0. Reischauer, professor and director, Institute of Far Eastern Studies, Harvard University 333 John Davis Lodge, chairman of the Committee To End Aid to the Soviet Enemy 346 Roy F. 1-lendrickson, executive secretary National Federation of Grain Cooperatives 366 Phillip D. Grub, associate professor and chairman, Department of Busi- ness Administration, Director of Programs in International Business, George Washington University 378 (III) PAGENO="0004" IV THURSDAY, JULY 25 Lawrence C. McQuade, Assistant Secretary for Domestic and International Business, Department of Commerce; accompanied by Rauer Meyer, Director, Office of Export Control, and Theodore Thau, Executive Page Secretary, Advisory Committee on Export Policy 389 Roy T. Englert, Deputy General Counsel, Department of the Treasury, accompanied by Mrs. Margaret Schwartz, Executive Office of Foreign Assets Control 410 J. Patrick Kittler, attorney at law, Minneapolis, Minn 415 ALPHABETICAL LIST OF WITNESSES Ball, George W., permanent representative-designate to the United Nations 29 Berman, Harold J., professor of law, Harvard University 240 Brody, David A., Washington representative of the Antidefamation League 183 Donaghue, Hugh P., assistant to the president, Control Data Corp 149 Dymsza, William A., research director, International Business Institute, Rutgers University 173 Edelsberg, Herman, director, International Council, B'nai B'rith 183 Edgerton, William B., representative, Friends Committee on National Legislation 162 Englert, Roy T., Deputy General Counsel, Department of the Treasury_ 410 Frank, Isaiah, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University 234 Fredriksen, A. R., i\Iinnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co 296 Glick, Warren W., Assistant General Counsel, Export-Import Bank of the United States 127 Grub, Phillip D., associate professor and chairman, Department of Business Administration, Director of Programs in International Business, George Washington University 378 Hendrickson, Roy F., executive secretary, National Federation of Grain Cooperatives 366 Hicks, W. B., Jr., executive secretary, Liberty Lobby 279 Jaffe, Michael, general counsel, Liberty Lobby 279 Kittler, J. Patrick, attorney at law, Minneapolis, Minn 415 Linder, Harold F., President and Chairman, Export-Import Bank of the United States 127 Lodge, John Davis, chairman, the Committee To End Aid to the Soviet Enemy 346 McFadden, J. 1-lugh, staff member, Export-Import Bank of the United States 127 McQuade, Lawrence C., Assistant Secretary for Domestic and Inter- national Business, Department of Commerce 193, 213, 389 Meyer, Rauer, Director, Office of Export Control, Department of Corn- merce 389 Middleton, B. Jenkins, Vice President, Export-Import Bank of the United States 127 Mondale, Walter F., U.S. Senator from the State of Minnesota 20 Perry, J. Wiley, Jr., chairman, Import Study Committee, Cast Iron Soil Pipe Institute 327 Reischauer, Edwin 0., professor and director, Institute of Far Eastern Studies, Harvard University 333 Roosa, Robert V., partner, Brown Bros., Harriman & Co 306 Schwartz, Mrs. Margaret, Executive Office of Foreign Assets Control, Department of the Treasury 389 Teague, Randal Cornell, director of regional and State activities, Young Americans for Freedom, Inc 256 Than, Theodore, Executive Secretary, Advisory Committee on Export Policy, Department of Commerce 389 Thurmond, Strom, U.S. Senator from the State of South Carolina 4 Trezise, Philip H., Ambassador to the Organization of Economic Copeora- tion and Development 45 Wright, Robert B., Director, Office of East-West Trade, Department of State - Zérby, Paul G., Dorsey, Marquart, Windhorst West, & Hailaday, Min- neapolis, Minn 324 PAGENO="0005" V MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, LETTERS, AND DATA Agriculture, Department of: Freeman, Orville L., Secretary: Excerpts from statement before House Committee on Ways and Page Means 511 Allen, Dr. Robert Loring, professor of economics, University of Missouri at St. Louis, statement of 1134 Allied Chemical Corp., letter to Senator Mondale 993 American Assembly, report of the 31st, reprinted from the Congressional Record 460 American Export Isbrandtsen, letter to Senator Mondale from John M. Will, admiral, U.S. Navy (retired) 993 American Legion: Resolutions Nos. 20 and 338 426 Stringer, Harald E., director, letter to Senator Muskie 425 American Motors Corp.: Chapin, Roy D., Jr., letter to Senator Mondale 994 Milwaukee Journal, article submitted to committee 994 Public Relations Department, statement of 999 "American Review of East-West Trade," reprint of article from magazine entitled 1030 American Tobacco Co., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 Baker, Russell, statement of 1140 Bank of America, National Trust & Savings Association, letter to committee from R. A. Peterson, president 999 Barghoorn, Frederick C., chairman, Council on Russian and East European Studies, Yale University, statement of 1142 Battle Act report (contents listed on p. 617) 615 Bell & Howell Co., letter to Senator Mondale, from Peter G. Peterson, chairman of the board 1002 Benoit, Prof. Emile: Letter to Senator Mondale 1143 Reprint of paper entitled "The Joint Venture Route to East-West Investment" 1144 Speech before the American Management Association, reprint of 1143 Bergson, Dr. Abram, letter and statements submitted to the committee 1149 Berliner, Joseph S., professor of economics, Brandeis University, state- ment of 1157 Berman, Harold J., professor of law, Harvard University, letter and articles submitted to the committee 1160 Blackie, William, president, Caterpillar Tractor Co.: Address entitled "Peaceful Engagement: A Progression From Cold-War Containment" 1004 Statement before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee 1012 B'nai B'rith, statement of Herman Edelsberg, director, International Council 183 Brzezinski, Zbigniew, Columbia University Research Institute on Coin- inunist Affairs, letter and articles submitted to the committee 1285 Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 Byrnes, Robert F., professor of history, Indiana University, statement oL 1307 Cast Iron Soil Pipe Institute, statement of J. Wiley Perry, Jr., chairman of the Import Study Committee 327 Caterpillar Tractor Co., letter and statement submitted by William Blackie, chairman 1003 Chamber of Commerce of the United States, statement of Jay H. Ceif, manager, International Group 387 Chas. Pfizer & Co., letter to the comniittee, from John J. Powers, Jr 1028 Columbia Journal of World Business, reprint of article by Sidney H. Scheuer, entitled "To Russia With Trade" 1116 PAGENO="0006" VI Commerce Department: Page Current Export Bulletin No. 941, reprint of 9 Distribution license consignee statement, copy of 781 Export control, reprint of 84th quarterly report by the Secretary_ - - - 705 McQuade, Lawrence C., Assistant Secretary for Domestic and Inter- national Business, statements of 193, 213, 389 Meyer, Rauer H., Director, Office of Export Control, letter to com- mittee 518 Non-Cocom-controlled items controlled by the United States to Eastern Europe, June 25, 1968, reprint of tables submitted for the record 519 Single transaction statement by consignee and purchaser 783 Committee to End Aid to the Soviet Enemy. Statement of John Davis Lodge, chairman 346 Commodity control list issued by Department of Commerce, reprint oL - 519 Congressional Record, reprints from: Dominick, Senator Peter H., remarks on July 31, 1968 445 Javits, Senator Jacob K., remarks on May 4, 1968 459 "Licensing of gravity meter to Poland," inserted March 28, 1968~. 502 Mondale, Senator Walter F., statement on introduction of Senate Joint Resolution 169 22 1\'Iuskie, Senator Edmund S., remarks on February 21, 1968 495 Mundt, Senator Karl E., remarks on March 27, 1968 471 Percy, Senator Charles H., address before the Michigan State Repub- lican convention 500 Control Data Corp., statement of Hugh P. Donaghue, assistant to the president 149 Crown Zellerbach Corp., letter to committee, from R. 0. Hunt 1028 Current Export Bulletin, No. 970, August 22, 1968, reprint of 765 Deegan, Thomas J., reprint of remarks to East-West Trade Conference, Bowling Green University 1332 Deere & Co., letter to Senator Mondale, from E. F. Curtis, senior vice president, enclosing reprint of article from American Review of East- West Trade 1028 Defense Department, letter from Paul C. Warnke, assistant secretary to Arthur K. Watson, chairman of the board, IBM World Trade Corp~ 443 Distribution license consignee statement, copy of 765, 781 Dittman, Reidar, Director, International Studies, St. Olaf College, letter to committee 1309 Donehower, William L., Jr., chairman, executive committee, Rolled Zinc Manufacturers Association, Inc., letter to Senator Muskie 438 Douglas Aircraft Co., letter to Senator Mondale, from J. T. McMillan, vice president 1036 Electronic Industries Association, letter to Senator Mondale from William T. Ellis, manager, international department 1036 Encyclopaedia Britannica, letter to Senator Mondale, from Charles E. Swanson 1037 Export Control, 84th quarterly report by the Secretary of Commerce - - - 705 Export-Import Bank of Washington, Harold F. Linder, letter to Senator Sparkman 499 "Fiat-Soviet Auto Plant and Communist Economic Reforms," excerpt from hearings entitled 510 Friends Service Committee on National Legislation, statement of William B. Edgerton 162 Galbraith, John Kenneth, letter to Senator Mondale 1309 Garson, John R., reprint of articles written with Prof. Harold J. Berman. 1161 General Motors Corp., letter to Senator Mondale from J. M. Roche - - - 1037 Goldman, Marshall I., associate professor of economics, Wellesley College, excerpt from article by 1310 Griffith, William E., professor of political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, letter from 1312 Harriman, W. Averell, Ambassador at Large, address before the 31st American Assembly 466 Hewlett-Packard Co.: Chart showing percent of business affected by international (Cocom) and unilateral U.S. export controls 1041 Letters to Senator Mondale from David Packard 1039-1040 PAGENO="0007" VII International Business Machines Corp.: Defense Department, letter to Arthur D. Watson from Paul C. Page Warnke, Assistant Secretary 443 Jones, Gilbert E., letter to Senator Mondale 389 Mackay, Alan, reprint of statement before stockholders meeting - - - 277 Secretary of State, letter to Arthur K. Watson 442 Watson, Arthur K., chairman of the board, IBM World Trade Corp., statement submitted by 441 International Economic Policy Association, statement of Dr. N. R. Danielian, president 427 International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union: Resolution No. 13, on China trade 431 Statement of 430 International Paper Co., letter to Senator Mondale, from E. B. unman, president 1041 Jacobson, Prof. Harold K., University of Michigan Department of Political Science, letter to Senator Mondale 1318 Johnson, D. Gale, professor of Economics, University of Chicago, state- ment of 1312 Justice, Department of: Clark, Ramsey, Attorney General, letter to the Secretary of State - - 819 Kaser, Michael, lecturer in Soviet Economics, Oxford University, state- ment of 1318 Kennan, George, Institute for Advanced Study, School of Historical Studies, Princeton, N.J., letter to Senator Muskie, enclosing statement on dealing with the Communist world 431 Kimberly-Clark Corp., letter to Senator Mondale from John R. Kimberly, chairman of the board 1041 Kindleberger, C. P. Department of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, letter and article submitted to the committee 1324 Knorr, Klaus, director, Princeton University Center of International Studies, letter to Senator Mondale 1333 League of Women Voters of the United States, statement of 430 "Legislative Picture of East-West Trade," reprint of address by Senator Wayne Morse 284 Liberty Lobby, statement of W. B. Hicks, Jr., executive secretary 279 Library of Congress, Legislative Reference Service, reprint of paper dis- tributed by 889 "Licensing of Gravity Meter in Poland," article reprinted in Congressional Record 502 Life magazine, reprint of editorial from 1131 Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 MacMillen, William C. Jr., president, Tower International Inc., statement of 1330 Mikesell, Raymond F., professor of economics, Oregon University, letter to Senator Mondale 1334 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Co., statement of A. R. Fredriksen, vice president 296 Morse, Wayne, U.S. Senator from the State of Oregon: Letter to Senator Muskie 283 Reprint of address to the American Management Association 284 National Export Expansion Council, excerpts from paper published by action committee ~ 1042 National Federation of Grain Cooperatives, statement of Roy F. Hendrick- son, executive secretary 366 Nation-Wide Committee on Import-Export Policy, statement of 0. R. Strackbein, chairman 440 Nelson, Clifford C., president, the American Assembly, statement of___ 460 Percy, Charles H., U.S. Senator from the State of Illinois, address before the Michigan State Republican convention 500 Petroni, Donald V., reprint of paper entitled "Doing Business in Eastern European Countries" 1046 Philip Morris Inc., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 P. Lorillard Co., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 PAGENO="0008" VIII Pregelj, Vladimir N., analyst in international trade and finance, paper entitled "The Proposed East-West Trade Relations Act of 1966: Page Analysis of Its Economic Aspects" 889 Reprints from newspapers and other publications: American Review of East-West Trade, editorials from 1344 Business International, entitled "U.S. Firms Lose Out on Trade With Communist Nations to United Kingdom, European Rivals" - 1129 Chicago Tribune, entitled "More Trade Is Urged With Eastern Europe" 43 East-West Trade News, entitled "Off to a Good Start" 1395 Fortune magazine, entitled: "East Europe's Struggle for Economic Freedom" 1365 "More and More Western Companies Are Learning the Tech- niques and Rewards of Trading in the Challenging East European Market" 1358 Illinois Agricultural Economics, entitled "Prospects for U.S. Wheat Exports to the Soviet Bloc" 1372 Milwaukee Journal, entitled "American Motors Officials Bitter Over Turmoil Triggered by Speculation; Aide's Musing Ignited Furor on Sales to Reds" 993 New Guard, entitled: "A Statement of Policy-Trading With the Enemy" 278 "The Case Against East-West Trade" 274 New Republic, entitled "East-West Business Cooperation-A New Approach to Communist Europe" 1386 Newsweek, entitled "Capitalization on Communism" 1389 New York Times, entitled: "Soviet Economy in Major Shift" 1393 "Soviet Engineer Lauds United States for Business Efficiency"_ 1392 "U.N. Unit Assesses East's Economies" 1394 Saturday Review, entitled "Report From Rumania" 1400 The Economist, entitled: "How Switch Trading Works" 1342 "How To Win a Russian Order" 119 The Scotsman (Edinburgh), entitled "British Firms Seek Huge Soviet Orders" 1402 U.S. News & World Report, entitled "A Businessman Sizes Up Russia" 1404 Washington Post, entitled: "Dc Gaulle Urges Soviet Bloc Nations To Be Independent" - -- 1403 "Soviets To Allow Offices for Alien Firms" 1403 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., letter of support from Secretaries of State, Defense, and Commerce 827 Rolled Zinc Manufacturers Association, Inc., letter to Senator Muskie, from William L. Donehower, Jr., chairman, executive committee~~ 438 Rusk, Dean, Secretary of State, letter to Arthur K. Watson, chairman of the board, IBM World Trade Corp 442 Scheuer, Sydney H.: Article written for the Columbia Journal of World Business 1116 Letter to Senator Mondale 1112 Statement submitted to the Trade Information Committee 1112 Schwartz, Harry, specialist on Soviet affairs, New York Times, statement at East-West Trade Conference, Bowling Green University, reprint oL 1335 Sharpe, Louis, publisher and editor, the American Review of East-West Trade, reprint of articles by 1344 Sherfield, Lord, reprint of address entitled "The Role of the 1\'lerchant Bank in East-West Trade" 1122 Single transaction statement by consignee and purchaser, reprint of 783 Solomon, Anthony, Assistant Secretary of State, testimony before Foreign Affairs European Subcommittee 508 Sorensen, Theodore C., statement entitled "Building Business Bridges to Moscow" 1124 Spaak, Paul-Henri, former Prime Minister of Belgium, statement of~~ 1337 Special Committee on U.S. Trade Relations With East European Countries and the Soviet Union, reprint of report to the President 793 PAGENO="0009" Ix State, Department of: Page Airgrams, reprints of 831 Announcement regarding U.S. patents in the U.S.S.R 828 Bulletin dated September 26, 1966, excepts from 822 Katzenbach, Nicholas deB., Acting Secretary, letter to the Attorney General 821 Paper from Director of Intelligence and Research containing statistics on East-West trade 829 Rusk, Dean, Secretary, letter to Arthur D. Watson, chairman of the board. IBM World Trade Corp 442 Solomon, Anthony, Assistant Secretary, testimony before Foreign Affairs European Subcommittee 508 Special Committee on U.S. Trade Relations With East European Countries and the Soviet Union, reprint of report to the President - 793 Strackbein, 0. R., chairman, Nation-Wide Committee on Import-Export Policy,statementsubmittedby 440 Taylor, Henry J., comments on two articles written by 503 Texas Instruments, Inc., letter to Senator Mondale, from Mark Shepherd, Jr., president 1129 Time, Inc., letter to Senator Mondale from James Linen 1131 Treasury, Department of: Englert, Roy T., Deputy General Counsel, statement of 410 Foreign Assets Control Offices, reprints of regulations 833 Ulam, Adam B., Harvard University Russian Research Center, letter to Senator Mondale 1341 United Aircraft, letter to committee from W. P. Gwinn, president 1132 United Nations: Conference on Trade and Development, reprint of report by 931 Fagen, Melvin M., Director, Commission Affairs and Trade, summary of statement by 986 Wexier, Dr. William A., president of B'nai B'rith, statement of 184 Young Americans for Freedom, Inc.: "East-West Trade: Committing National Suicide," reprint of paper by_ 268 Mackay, Allan, national chairman, reprint of statement before IBM stockholders meeting 277 Teague, Randal Cornell, director of regional and State activities, statement of 256, 262 Young, Stephen M., U.S. Senator from the State of Ohio, statement of 502 Xerox, letter to Senator Mondale from J. C. Wilson, chairman 1133 TABLES AND CHARTS TABLES Analysis of the decontrol action for exports to Eastern European Com- munist countries 8 Comecon wheat imports, 5-year averages, 1955-56 to 1959-60, and 1960-61 to 1964-65, and 1965-66 marketing year 1377 Commodities excluded from distribution licensing procedure 775 Commodities licensed for export to Eastern European destinations, second quarter, 1938 730 Commodity composition by commodity groups in trade between Western and Eastern Europe (in millions of dollars and percent) 970 Commodity composition of exports of developed market economy countries to individnal Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in 1964 (SITC, in millions of dollars and percei~t) 971 Commodity composition of exports of developed market economy countries to individual Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in 1965 (SITC, in millions of dollars and percent) 972 Commodity composition of imports of developed market economy countries from individual Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in 1964 (SITC, in millions of dollars and percent) 972 Commodity composition of imports of developed market economy countries from individual Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in 1965 (SITC, in millions of dollars and percent) 974 Commodity control list as of June 30, 1968 746 Countries participating in trade groups 975 PAGENO="0010" Dollar value of commodity license applications l)rOcessed, licenses issued Page and actual exports to Eastern Europe, quarterly, 196 1-68 729 East European trade, 1963-67 358 Estimates of affiliates' exports 88 Eximbank guarantees for exports to- Communist countries 130 Eastern Europe 131 Export credit guarantee programs of major Western Countries 82 Exports and imports of developed market economy areas and individual countries in trade with Socialist countries, 1960 to 1966 (in millions of dollars) 952 Exports and imports of individual Socialist countries in trade with de- veloped market economy countries (in millions of dollars) 957 Exports from China (mainland) to developed market economy countries by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 958 Exports from China (mainland) to developed market ecOnomy countries by commodity sections (SITC, in millions of dollars) 967 Exports from developed market economy countries to China (mainland), by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 966 Exports from developed market economy countries to China (mainland) by commodity sections (SITC, in millions of dollars) 965 Exports from developed market economy countries to Socialist countries of Eastern Europe by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 960 Exports from developed market economy countries to Socialist countries of Eastern Europe by commodity sections (SITC, in millions of dollars) - 959 Exports from Socialist countries of Eastern Europe to developed market economy countries by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 962 Exports from Socialist countries of Eastern Europe to developed market economy countries by commodity sections (SITC, in millions of dollars)_ 961 Exports ol the free world and European Cocom countries to Communist areas, by selected commodities and commodity groups, 1964-6T5 143 Exports of selected free world countries to the world and to Communist areas 681 Exports to the U.S.S.R. and Eastern Europe 1130 Franco-Soviet trade 689 Free world exports to Communist areas, by regions 641, 679 Free world imports from Communist areas, by regions 642, 680 Free world trade with Communist areas, 1965-66 677 Free world wheat exports to Communist countries, fiscal years 1961-66~. 429 Industrial production, 1963-68 1345 Imports of selected free world countries from the world and from Com- munist areas 687 Imports of the free world and European Cocom countries from Commu- mist areas, by selected commodities and commodity groups, 1964-65_ 697 Long-term trade agreements concluded since 1965 between selected de- veloped market economy countries and Socialist countries 945 Main flows in East-West trade in 1966 932 Main flows in trade between Socialist and developed market economy countries in 1966 978 Non-Cocom-controlled items controlled by the United States to Eastern Europe, June 25, 1968 519 Officially supported export credit transactions exceeding 5 years from various developed countries to East European countries, by purpose, 1963-66 142 Projected wheat production, use, and surplus or deficit for Comecon countries for 1970 and 1975 1380 Representative credit guarantee systems compared 83 Sales surge to the East-Western exports to Eastern Europe 1390 Self-sufficiency wheat indexes for Comecon countries, 5-year averages, 1955-56 to 1959-60, and 1960-61 to 1964-65 1378 Share of East-West trade in total trade of the areas 933 Shares of developed market economy countries in exports of China (main- land) to world by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 969 Shares of developed market economy countries in world exports to China (mainland) by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 968 PAGENO="0011" XI Shares of developed market economy countries in exports of Socialist countries of Eastern Europe, to world by commodity sections (SITC, Page in percent) 962 Shares of developed market economy countries in world exports to Socialist countries of Eastern Europe by commodity sections (SITC, in percent)_ 963 Shares of Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in world exports to de- veloped market economy countries by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 961 Shares of Socialist countries of Eastern Europe in exports of developed market economy countries to world by commodity sections (SITC, in percent) 964 Sources of Eastern Europe wheat imports, 4-year averages, 1957-58 to 1960-61, and 1961-62 to 1964-65, and marketing year 1965-66 1379 Sources of U.S.S.R. wheat imports, 6-year averages, 1957-58 to 1962-63, and marketing years 1963-64, 1964-65, and 1965-66 1379 Total free world trade and free world trade with Communist areas 678 Trade of Communist areas with free world 643 Trade of free world and Cocom countries with Communist areas, 1947-66. 693 Trade of free world and of Communist areas with Cuba, 1959-66 703 Trade of free world and of U.S.S.R. with Cuba, by principal commodities, 1963-65 704 United Kingdom trade with Communist countries 832 U.S. exports and imports by areas, 1961-68 752 U.S. exports and imports from Eastern Europe and Communist areas in Asia, 1960-67 753 U.S. exports and imports from Eastern Europe and Communist areas in Asia, 1961-68 452 U.S. exports to Communist areas, by principal commodities, 1965-66~. 753 U.S. exports to Eastern Europe by principal commodities, 1965-67 754 U.S. imports from Communist areas, by principal commodities, 1965-6&.. 702 U.S. imports from Eastern Europe by principal commodities, 1965-67.~ 701 U.S. trade with Communist areas, 1938, 1948, and 1963-66 700 U.S. trade with Eastern Europe, 1963-67 385 U.S. trade with principal countries of Eastern Europe, 1966-68 715 U.S. trade with- Bulgaria 89 Czechoslovakia 92 East Germany 97 Hungary 100 Poland 104 Rumania 109 U.S.S.R 112 Value and percentage share of U.S. agricultural trade with Eastern Europe and Soviet Union 512 Western Europe's total trade and trade with Communist areas 638 Wheat. Estimated port value of sales to U.S.S.R. and East Europe 428 Sales to U.S.S.R. and East European countries, 1963-64 428 Wheat Exports from Comecon countries, 5-year averages, 1955-56 to 1959-60, and 1960-61 to 1964-65 1377 Wheat production in Comecon countries, growth rate, and percentage of world production, 1955-56 and 1965-66 marketing years 1376 World wheat exports by countries, 1955-56 and 1965-66 marketing years 1374 CHARTS Diagram of price formation for industrial goods embodying an agricultural raw material 1366 Distribution of the trade of Eastern Europe ~ 786 Percent of Hewlett-Packard business during first 6 months of fiscal 1968 affected by international (Cocom) and unilateral U.S. export controL__ 1041 Trade of Eastern Europe, excluding Soviet Zone of Germany, with the free world 786 Trade of the U.S.S.R.-1913-65 - 785 U.S. trade with Eastern Europe 714 PAGENO="0012" PAGENO="0013" EAST-WEST TRADE APPENDIX Additional Material Filed for the Record CONGRESS [Excerpt from Congressional Record, July 31, 1968] Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, yesterday the Senate adopted the first of my two amendments regarding the Pueblo. That amendment dealt with foreign aid. The second amendment dealt with trade and requested the President to establish an embargo on trade between the United States and all Communist countries listed in the Foreign Assistance Act until the crew of the Pueblo is released by North Korea. Mr. President, I had a conversation with a number of Senators who had been supporting me on the first amendment. It became apparent to me that some of the questions that were in my mind were also in theirs. One of the things we certainly did not want to do under any circumstances was to take an action which would have the appearance that the Senate is unwilling to act on behalf of the crew- members now held by the North Koreans. A rejection of my amendment on trade might be so interpreted. So, the amendment I have sent to the desk is a modifi- cation of my original trade proposal. It is `substantially different. Instead of requesting the President to actually establish an embargo, it ex- presses the sense of Congress that the President `should promptly review and submit to us a program for establishing partial or total trade embargoes with any or all Communist countries. It is intended to accomplish the same objective; namely, to get our crew out of North Korea. As I `said yesterday, after extensive briefings with as many people as I could find who know anything about the subject, I conclude we are not any further now in trying to get these crewmembers released from North Korea than we were when they were captured in January. We have tried by the usual diplomatic lines of communication to get other countries to be of assistance. But this is not easy to do. It seems to me in the process of trying to determine what mechanisms are open to us-and we took one affirmative, though limited step yesterday-we could by the adoption of this amendment use trade not only as an economic weapon but we could also start to use it as a strategic weapon, as I have been advocating for years. I would like to read into the Record the names of 25 countries which, at least as of June 1965, had diplomatic relations with North Korea. The countries are the Soviet Union, Mongolia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Ru- mania, Hungary, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Albania, Communist China, East Ger- many, North Vietnam. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. DOMINICK. I yield. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, would the prohibition apply to the furnishing of arms or supplies to the Vietcong? Does the Senator consider the Vietcong area of South Vietnam as a Communist country? Mr. DoMINICK. I did not say that was a Communist country. Mr. AIKEN. No. Mr. DOMINICK. I have not mentioned the Vietcong, although I would hope we could find mechanisms of getting at them. However, I am not talking about the Vietcong. The amendment requests the President to study and make recom- mendations regarding the countries listed as Communist in the Foreign Assistance Act. Mr. AIKEN. The Senator's provision would not in any way prevent funds from going by way of investment to South Vietnam, and would not prevent the furnishing of petroleum or other supplies to that area. (445) PAGENO="0014" 446 1~ir. DoMINICK. My amendment has nothing to do with South Vietnam or with the Vietcong in South Vietnam. Mr. AIKEN. Would the Senator be willing to have the prohibition apply to the Vietcong in South Vietnam? I think that is where it is needed most. Mr. DoMINICK. We have a prohibition against trading at the present time with the North Vietnamese. I do not believe anybody is trading with the Vietcong deliberately. Mr. AIKEN. Oh, I guess the Senator has not talked with the people with whom I have talked. Mr. DoMINIcK. I guess I have not. Mr. AIKEN. How does* the Senator account for the fact that the Vietcong use American dollars as their currency? Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I decline to yield any further. AU of the countries I have mentioned so far have been Communist controlled. There is also Cuba. Others which recognize North Korea are Guinea, Mali, Uganda, Yemen, Algeria, the United Arab Republic, Indonesia, Mauritania, Cambodia, and Brazza- ville-as far as that portion of the Congo is concerned-Ghana, and Tanzania. Some of these are certainly so-called nonalined nations. Not very many of the 25 are very friendly with the United States. These 25 are the ones that have, as I see it, diplomatic relations With North Korea. To the extent that we are trading with the Communist-controlled countries-which have the closest rela- tionship with North Korea-it strikes me that we have a much better lever than any other approach to put pressure on the North Korean Government to release these crewmembers. For example, the Soviet Union has been increasing its trade with us consider- ably. It might be interesting to the Senate in the process of discussing this to give some idea of what has been licensed for shipment to some of the Eastern bloc countries and the Soviet Union as of October 12, 1966. The following are "nonstrategic" goods which are licensed for shipment from us to the Soviet Union: Airborne communications equipment, generators for electronic equipment used to control aircraft, communications equipment, air- borne navigation equipment, and electronic computer and parts. Licensed for shipment to Czechoslovakia: Nuclear radiation detection and measuring instruments, electrical measuring and testing instruments, pyrotech- nical rocket engines, and transmitter radio beacons and parts. For Poland the licenses include: Electrical steel sheets, electrolytic tilling and coil preparation line, components and tubes for electrical equipment, metalwork- ing and cutting machine and parts, and radio communication receiver and parts. The authorized shipments to East Germany include: Boring and drilling machines, data processing systems, and rotary combustion engines. To Yugoslavia we are licensed to export copper scrap, semiconductors, aircraft parts, and communication cable. Hungary can import scientific and professional instrument parts, electronic navigational aids, airborne communication equip- ment and parts, and airborne navigational equipment and parts. Rumania is cleared to receive industrial instruments and parts, signal generators, hot alu- minum sheet mills, and aluminum cold-strip mills. And finally, Bulgaria's list includes industrial equipment and parts, electrical and electronic equipment and parts, and airborne radar-transponders-equipment. To the Soviet Union we have also licensed for shipment: rifle-cleaning com- pounds, propeller blades, propellers, machine-made paper for dynamite, gun wadding, shell stock, parachute cloth, tarpaulins, tents, and several other items of very direct and obvious military application. Also, crude rubber, railway cross ties, iron ore mass, aluminum, manganese, lead, zinc, chromium, tin, scrap metal, coke, liquefied petroleum gas, pig iron, carbon steel bars and rods, iron or steel rails, railway material. We have licensed airborne communications equipment. We have licensed navi- gational equipment for ships. The point I am making by outlining this is the fact that while we are licensing this type of equipment for shipment to them, they are the ones who have the maximum influence on the Government of North Korea at the present time. If they really want this equipment-and I presume they do, because they have been using us as a source for it over a long period of time-if the other Communist- controlled countries I have mentioned want the equipment they are looking for- and at the moment Rumania is asking for a nuclear powerplant and the tech- nology for it-it seems to me that a Presidential study and report is in order ~as to the advisability of our saying "No" unless or until they help us get these PAGENO="0015" 447 people out of North Korea. I suspect if this were done they could exercise a great deal of influence on the Government of North Korea almost overnight. Rather than an adamant attitude 011 this matter, I simply propose that we ask the President to submit programs outlining what he thinks can be done by em- bargoing this trade. If he says that he does not think anything can be done- which apparently is the attitude of some members of the State Department- that is one thing. If he thinks that by taking certain steps we can implement the pressure I have been talking about, then this is another thing. Congress then would be equipped at that point to move forward and institute a meaningful program in order to get licensing agreements which will have this effect. If the President says we should do it with respect to the Communist countries, with the exception of Czechoslovakia, because of the present situation regarding Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union, we can then take that into consideration. My amendment gives the President maximum flexibility to name one, any, or all of the countries and present a program which he thinks might be helpful in this area. It provides broad scope. It is a very flexible program, one which I believe is better than trying to write legislation in the Senate, without having been able to view the possible impact that this would have on the situation with Czechoslo- vakia as well as some of the other areas of the world. It is for that reason that I have modified it to provide only for Presidential review and recommendations to the Congress. I know that many people feel that trade is helpful, but the fact is that the trade we are conducting is not with the private citizen. I have made this point over and over again. Apparently nobody listens. We do not trade with any pri- vate person in any Communist country. All the trade that goes on is with the Communist-controlled, government-organized corporation in each one of those countries; and they are the only ones in any of those countries-whether it be Poland, Albania, Czechoslovakia, or Russia-who are allowed, under their gov- ernmental system, to buy anything from us. Then the government group decides what they are going to do with it, and it never gets down for the general benefit of the people. The President set up a special committee on U.S. trade relations with East Eu- ropean countries in 19G5. One of the statements I found particularly interesting in the report which was issued by that `committee is a statement `by Nathaniel Goldfinger, who is the director of research for the AFL-CIO and a trustee for the Joint Council on Economic Education. He said, as I have said time and again, that we are not opposed to this trade policy provided we get something from it. This is the point he makes, and I read from his statement: "Trade relations with the Soviet Union and its European satellites should be viewed as a tool of our Nation's foreign policy. Therefore, the report should have placed greater emphasis on the political aspects of this issue. "There is also inadequate caution in the report about the risk of exporting American technology, particularly advanced technology, to those countries. In centrally planned totalitarian states, military and economic factors are closely related." This is the very point I am trying to make, and it was put very succinctly by Mr. Goldfi'nger. We have a potential lever by which we can try to exert some pressure to get the Pueblo crew out of North Korea, and we are not using it. Whether we should or should not, under my amendment, would be left up to the President; but it does express the sense of Congress that we should take steps along this line. I reserve the remainder of my time. Mr. SYMINGTON. Mr. President, will the Senator from Alabama yield to me? Mr. SPARKMAN. I yield. Mr. SmIINGT0N. Mr. President, no one in this body is more interested in obtaining the release of the men on the Pueblo. Six come from my State. One lives in the same apartment house that we do and his mother and father are our good friends. Therefore, after much thought, I voted for the first amendment offered by the Senator from `Colorado. But it seems to me this amendment could at least imply something was basi- cally wrong with any trade with any country behind the Iron Curtain. Several years ago, in a hearing before the Committee on Foreign Relations I asked both the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of the Treasury if there was any developed country of the free world not doing its best to trade behind that Iron Curtain. Both `Cabinet members said that, to the best of their knowledge, there was not a single developed country not doing its best to that and except the PAGENO="0016" 448 United States. I then asked the Secretary of Commerce if he did not believe the reason General de Gaulle had recognized Red China was because `he was getting tired of seeing countries like Great Britain develop their trade relations With the Chinese. The Secretary of Commerce said, "Of course, that was one of `the reasons `France `had recognized Red China. Mr. President, some years ago I decided we had little money left to give other countries; therefore I began voting against much of the foreign aid bills that have come up since then. At that time, alsO I said, my slogan from here on would be more trade and less aid; because in the capitalistic system., it is volume that gives low cost and low cost is essential to obtain a profit. It seems to me that those of us who criticize, actually or by implication, trade with the Soviet Union, or trade by the Soviet Union with countries such as North Vietnam, should realize that in the last 5 years the United States has built up its military sales alone to foreign countries from $300 million a year to some $1.5 billion a year; and many of those countries to whom we sell are on the border of the Soviet Union. In addition, it appears from the press that all is not completely well with re- spect to the relationship of the Soviet Union with some of its satellites. We have known that was true for a long time with respect to Romania, Yugoslavia, and Poland; and now it is obvious it is also true with respect to Czechoslovakia. To me it seems that to hold Czechoslovakia responsible for the actions of North Korea, as might be interpreted under this amendment, would not be just, and would not be in the best interests of the United States. As a member of the Committee on Foreign Relations, it is clear to me that many developments in Southeast Asia have created a great deal of apprehension in the Soviet Union, just as they have created apprehension in the United States. Being one who is for more trade as against aid, and because of reasons just mentioned in these extemporaneous comments, I shall oppose the amendment. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I have listened with a great deal of interest to the very distinguished Senator from Missouri, with whom I side on most occa- sions. I can understand his concern. The concern, I have, which I know is shared by him, is whether there is any method by which we can do something other than just meet in Panmunjom in order to try to persuade the North Koreans to release these men. Most of the suggestIons that have been made around the country have been risky, to say the least. They may have some merit, but they certainly have a great deal of risk. The kind of amendment I have proposed would not involve any military action, and it would not involve any action other than to have the President review and make recommendations to Congress on whether an embargo on trade should be established, and if so, what kind and against whom? North Korea trades with Communist China and with the Soviet Union. It also trades with many other countries so to look at only one will not be effective. I am not saying an embargo has to be set up. I am saying, let the President send us a program and tell us what might help. If he does not have a program, or does not want a program let him tell us; but I am absolutely convinced there must be some economic or diplomatic measure we can use to get those men out of North Korea, a weapon we are not now using. I hope this amendment will en- able us to move on. Mr. SYMINGTON. Mr. President, I point out that trade was mentioned between not only North Korea and the Soviet Union, but also North Korea and Red China. The PRESIDING Orricnn (Mr. Young of Ohio in the chair). The Senate will be in order. If attaches do not stop talking to each other, the Chair will direct the Sergeant at Arms to clear the aisles. Mr. SYMINGTON. I think one of the most unfortunate aspects of our venture in Vietnam is that it has been preventing this Nation from developing a better understanding with the Soviet Union, and this especially because of the problems that have developed between that great country and Red China. As my good friend from Colorado says, we are generally in agreement on these matters. I was wondering whether he would be willing to modify his amendment to take in only North Korea. If he did that, then there would not be, even by implication, any criticism of, say, Czechoslovakia. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, will the Senator from Missouri yield? Mr. SYMINGTON. I am happy to yield to the Senator from Vermont. Mr. AIKEN. I would like to join the Senator from Missouri in expressing the opinion that the country we should be putting the pressure on is North Korea, not the other, smaller countries who are trying to break out of the Soviet or Com- munist orbit. PAGENO="0017" 449 Also, I am afraid that the amendments which we have approved will not be in the least effective toward releasing the men of the Pueblo but will, perhaps, give false hope to their families. We have done too much shadow boxing. We have bordered on irresponsibility in dealing with this subject. The thing that incenses me most is the fact that the Vietcong in South Viet- nam are reported on good authority to get a great deal of their financing, and a major part of their supplies, from the United States. Of course, they get their antiaircraft guns from Russia, but we know that American businessmen pay pro- tection money over there, and they are well protected. They do not get killed after they pay their protection money. It is so revolting to think that we are in a war over there where, for the first time in history, some are involved in financing both sides. As `some `Members of the Senate read the other day, smugglers who get rice to the Vietcong insist on being paid with American dollars. That speaks a great deal more for the American dollar than it does for Amer- ican `diplomacy when the Vietcong themselves use our money as their currency. I think that we should do everything we can to put the pressure on North Korea. There must be some way to do `that s'hort of the atomic bomb. I know there are people who advocate extreme measures because I have heard from them. They `say we should use every means that we have, including the atomic bomb, if necessary. I know that everyone here wants to help get those men of the Pueblo back home, and would do almost anything t'o `bring that about. But, let us go at it in the right way `and put the pressure, the force, where it is necessary-that is, on North Korea. `I know there is dispute as to where the Pueblo was, whether within the 3-mile limit or the 12-mile limit, or wherever it wa's. I know that it is repulsive to have to pay ransom money to get the crew back. Yet, I am told, we paid $100 million to Cuba to get back `some of our fellows that went down there on the Bay of Pigs invasion. The idea of paying ransom is repugnant and should not be resorted to unless to keep these men from `being executed. But when it comes to punishing the smaller countries that wis'h they could get out from under the Communist orbit, for `something they cannot help, then I think we are doing wrong. The Senator from Missouri recalls that 2 years `ago Henry Luce led a group of 20 top-flight `businessmen to Eastern Europe to create better relations with them in a business sense. American corporations are all Communists, by any means, merely because they American corporations are all Communists, by any means merely because they went to Eastern Europe. Thus, I hope w~e use reason and not emotion in our efforts to get the men of the Pueblo back home. I repeat, everyone here will do anything humanly possible to get `them back. If anyone is talking about war against them, we would probably have `been more justified in going to war with North Korea th'an we were against North Vietnam. But `such action would surely have resulted in the death of all the crew of the Pueblo. i\ir. SYMINGTON. I thank the able senior Senator from Vermont for his typically wise and constructive remarks. Through the years that I have served on the Committee on Foreign Relations, I have come to the conclusion that `he is as wise in this field as any Member of this body, even though we do not happen to sit on the same side of the aisle. Mr. President, we politicians have not done too well when it comes to solving many of the problems of the cold war. Perhaps we would want to ask the aid of businessmen, and bankers, in normal fashion, to see if there is `some way they could help us reduce cold war tensions; tensions which are costing the American people so many billions of dollars a month. As I read the amendment offered by my good friend from Colorado, if I were a `Czech official, I would be hurt by it being offered at this time, when it is known they are having these crucial negotiation's with the Soviet Union. Ap- parently `they desire to create in their own country the type and character of independence we value so h!ighly in this country. When it comes to the other better entrenched members of the Iron Curtain country `bloc, for example, Yugoslavia, if I were in the position of Tito, I would resent it. I would say, "Well, if this is `the way the United `States plans to take it out on me, considering I had nothing whatever to do with the Pueblo action, which 97-627-68-pt. 2-2 PAGENO="0018" 450 may well have been suggested or approved by the Chinese Communists, that les- sens any. desire to put any pressure on North Korea to let *the crew of the Pueblo go." Mr. President, I will be glad to yield to my good friend from Colorado if he still wants me to yield to him; otherwise, I yield the floor. Mr. Do~IINIcK. If the Senator will yield for one comment, he asked me if I would be willing to make a modification with regard to substituting North Korea for the other countries. My answer would be "NO," because we do not have any trade of any kind, under present law, with North Korea. We have an embargo on. Thus, we have no economic power to put on North Korea. Mr. SYMINGTON. As I understand it, the Senator modified the original amend- ment, so it was to be the sense of the Senate. Speaking as one Senator, it is not my sense, the way the world is today, with the growing tensions behind the Iron Curtain. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, a parliamentary inquiry. What is the time situa- tion on the pending measure? The PRESIDING OFFICER. The time on the pending amendment has not expired as yet. Mr. McGnz. How much time remains? The PRESIDING OFFICER. Twelve minutes remain to the Senator from Alabama, and 8 minutes remain to the Senator from Oolorado. Mr. MCGEE. Would the Senator from Alabama yield me some time? Mr. SPARKMAN. I am glad to yield to the Senator from Wyoming. How much time would he desire? Mr. MCGEE. Let me start with 5 minutes, and then let us see how we go along here. How much time would the Senator be able to yield tome? Mr. SPARKMAN. Five minutes, subject to renewal of the Senator's time. The PRESIDING `OFFICER. The Senator from Wyoming is recognized for 5 minutes. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I announce that I am going to offer a substitute amendment to the amendment being offered by the Senaitor from Colorado. I have been advised by the Parliamentarian that I cannot offer it until all time has. ex- pired or has been yielded back on the pending amendment. Therefore, I withhold sending my amendment to the desk at this moment. Mr. President, my amendent will propose to confine the language of this measure to trade between the United States bnd North Korea. The point of it is that it will enable all Senators who are equally concenied about `the men on the Pueblo to be on a recorded vote as supporting a measure for the men on the Pueblo. I think it is unfortunate that we are probing here for some kind of political impression for the folks back home, rather than doing something about the men on the Pueblo. I think those in this body who felt compelled, in the interests of our foreign policy, to vote "no" on a similar measure last night have an opportu- nity to vote for the men on the Pueblo. Very frankly, that is the reason why I am offering the substitute amendment. May I remind my colleagues hi this body that the whole phase of the world Com- munist movement is changing very rapidly. Those days when it was a monolith, when they all marched in cadence, were frightening indeed. We pursued a policy in our country which was aimed at cracking the solid front, in causing the cadence in their march to be broken. And we are witnessing those days right now. These are critically significant days, and perhaps the most significant develop- ment in what we have called the cold war, for no longer are `the world Com- munists marching in unison. They are marching differently in China. They are marching differently in Eastern Europe. `They are marching differently in al- most every part of the world. Why, then, should we take action in this body that will, at the very least, tend to galvanize the various kinds of Communist gov- ernments around the world against the cracks that have been appearing, when it is against our interest not to do business With them? It seems to me that we hurt nobody by the proposed amendment of our distin- guished colleague from Colorado except ourselves. We are the ones that have the greatest stake in disrupting the unification among the Communists. Yet, in a single move here in psychological warfare, we would thrust them closer together again. I think we would be ill advised to pursue to passage the proposed resolution by the distinguished junior Senator from Colorado. Therefore, I am prepared to send to the desk, at the proper parliamentary moment, when the time has ex- pired or has all been yielded back, my substitute amendment that would limit the language of the pending amendment to North Korea. Mr. SPARKMAN. Mr. President, how much time do I have left? PAGENO="0019" 451 The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Alabama has 7 minutes remaining. Mr. SPARKMAN. I yield 5 minutes to the Senator from Ohio [Mr. Lausche]. Mr. LAUSCUE. Mr. President, the amendment offered by the Senator from Colorado, a distinguished Member of the Senate, for whom I have the highest regard, calls upon the President to submit a program that will achieve an emanci- pation of the Pueblo and the men who operated it. I think that if anything is to be done by the Congress, it ought to be done directly, and not by asking the Presi- dent to submit a program which substantially has been enunciated in what has been done. In my opinion, the Paeblo was seized with the purpose of precipitating the United States into another war in Korea. The Communists were of the opinion that, with the impasse that seems to exist in South Vietnam, if we were thrown into another war in Korea, our position would be helpless and disastrous to the United States. There are some who have argued, as the Senator from Vermont has said, that we ought to use the full power of the United States to go into Korea and liberate the ship and the men- Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, if the Senator will yield, I did not advocate going into Korea with force of arms. Since North Korea has a mutual defense agree- ment with China, that would have the effect of declaring war against China, too. What I do say is that we should use the full power of our diplomatic and eco- nomic force to secure the release of these men. Mr. LAUSOHE. North Korea has a bilateral agreement with Russian. She h.as a bilateral agreement with China. China and Russia have said: "If you are offended by any nation, we will come `to your aid." That means we would be in- volved in a war with Russia and Red China. Mr. AIKEN. If the Senator will yield further, I may say that is the very reason why the Congress has not yielded to the recommendations of certain extremist groups in this country and declared war on North Vietnam, because that would also involve a declaration of war against Russia and China. Mr. LATJSCHE. I concur completely. Mr. AIKEN. I think that ought to be made clear. Mr. LATJSCHE. Mr. President, if we are going to adopt anything, we ought to speak directly. The President has indicated his problem. If we have a different solution, let us write it into the bill. `I have some sympathy for what the Senator from Missouri has suggested when he stated that the embargo should be directed only against those ships of foreign nations that go into Korea, and Korea alone. Whether or not that can be done, I cannot support the amendment of the Senator from Colorado, which says that it is the sense of Congress that the President should promptly review and sub- mit to Congress a program for the establishment of an effective method of procur- ing the release of the men and the U.S.S. Pueblo. If we are going to `do it, let us do it; and when I say let us do it, we are going to run into the same barrier that has faced `the President in his ability to do it, except if we want to get into another war. `The PRESIDING OFFIcER. Who yields time? Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I have listened to the arguments, and I would like `to `make a couple of statements to my distinguished friend from Ohio of whom I am very fond, and to the distinguished Senator from Wyoming, whom I know so well and for whom I have high regard. What I am trying to do is find some lever which can be used to put pressure on the North Korean Government. We do not have any trade with `North Korea, so `to limit this language to having an embargo on our trade with North Korea seems to me to be an exercise in complete futility. It became a'pparent there were enough people who were in `opposition `to my original trade `amendment, which actually requested an embargo be set up by the President, to jeopa'rdize its passage. I certainly did not want to propose any kind of program which the Senate was going to reject `and thereby lead any other country to `believe tha't we are not going to continue our efforts to try to get our crewmen out of Korea. I there- fore modified the amendment to provide only for a study. We are having a siza- ble amount of trade with many Communist countries. They are constantly asking for more. I have a chart which I ask unanimous consent `to have placed in the Record at this point which shows the extent of this trade. There being no objection, the chart was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows: PAGENO="0020" TABLE B-U.S. EXPORTS TO AND IMPORTS FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND COMMUNIST AREAS IN ASIA, 1960-67 tIn thousands of dollarsi Country 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 Exports, including reexports Total 194,467 133,568 125,369 166,817 339,926 140,010 197,821 197,149 Eastern European areas 194,467 133,561 125,365 166,814 339,923 140,009 197,820 195,147 ~ Albania 3 2 (1) 19 8 166 56 C.~i Bulgaria 73 47 33 136 5, 020 3, 613 3, 631 4, 219 l~ Czechoslovakia 4,740 7,388 7,173 9,791 11,338 27,685 37,336 19,155 EastGermany 4,042 2,775 1,698 6,403 20,211 12,413 24,864 26,329 Estonia Hungary 1, 650 1, 410 837 17, 371 13,753 9, 327 10, 053 7, 570 Latvia 824 2,911 4,887 2,364 1,807 Lithuania 1 323 Poland 143,111 74,856 94,577 108,936 138,066 35,417 52,988 60,827 Rumania 1,260 1,424 802 1,249 5,156 6,385 27,057 16,796 U.S.S.R 38,764 42,750 15, 355 20,241 144, 553 45, 161 41,725 60, 195 Communist areas in Asia 2 7 2 4 2 3 x 3 2 1 2 2 2 China, including Manchuria 2 7 2 4 2 3 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 Outer Mongolia (1) 1 North Korea North Vietnam (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) General imports Total 83, 848 84, 634 82, 442 85, 142 102, 305 141, 590 182, 179 179, 812 Eastern European areas 80,934 81,062 78,918 81,489 98,561 137,496 178,668 177,222 Albania 65 74 123 117 102 113 109 335 Bulgaria 781 1, 248 1, 136 1, 195 1, 177 1,666 2, 529 2, 814 Czechoslovakia 12,214 9,286 9,989 10,369 12,706 16,741 27,695 26,241 PAGENO="0021" East Germany 3,153 2,522 3,096 3,158 6,686 6,537 8,194 5,647 Estonia - 2 (1) 6 96 13 113 55 Hungary 1,809 2,024 1,813 1,581 1,693 2,092 2,985 3,884 Latvia 2 (1) 1 810 418 12 18 34 Lithuania 13 (1) (1) 15 4 33 8 32 Poland 38,807 41,316 45,836 43,119 54,202 65,861 82,948 90,960 Rumania 1, 461 1, 362 626 789 1, 272 1, 836 4,655 6, 176 U.S.S.R 22,629 23,228 16,298 20,330 20,160 42,592 29,414 41,044 Communistareas in Asia 2,914 3,572 3,524 3,653 3,789 4,094 3,511 2,590 China, including Manchuria 253 447 241 264 477 463 102 181 Outer Mongolia 2,658 3,125 3,283 3,389 3,312 3,631 3,409 2,409 North Korea 3 North Vietnam (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1 Less than $500. Lithuania, Outer Mongolia, Poland, Rumania, and the U.S.S.R., except the Maritime Province. Pur- 2 Figures shown include printed matter under general license and shipments to diplomatic missions scant to the Trade Agreements Extension Act of 1951, benefits of trade agreement tariff concessions of friendly foreign countries, were withdrawn from the U.S.S.R. and other Eastern European areas and an embargo was imposed on 3 Not reported separately, the import of certain furs from China and the U.S.S.R. Controls over imports of Chinese and North Korean merchandise are exercised by the Treasury Note: Exports are shown by area of destination. Imports are credited to the area in which the Department under Foreign Assets Control Regulations issued December 17, 1950. On May 5, 1964, merchandise was originally produced, sot necessarily the area from which purchases and shipments license control of imports from North Vietnam was added to these regulations. Under these regula- were made. General iniports represent merchandise entered immediately upon arrival into mer- tines the import of Chinese goods is prohibited without license by the Treasury Department, and chandising or consumption channels plus commodities entered into bonded customs warehouses it is contrary to the ,present policy of that agency to license such imports. Some items of Chinese ~. for storage. origin, however, continue to appear in the statistical records of U.S. imports. For example, duty-free C,n United States exports to North Korea were embargoed July 1950, and those to Communist China, merchandise permitted entry for customs inspection but subsequently rejected when determined Cj.3 Manchuria, and Outer Mongolia were embargoed the following December. On Mar. 1, 1951, general to be of Chinese origin may be counted in the statistics. The figures may also include imports licensed export licenses to Eastern European areas were revoked and the requirement of prior approval by to avoid undue hardsisip to firms and individuals who acquired the Chinese merchandise in good license was extended to cover all exports to this area. On July 26, 1954, exports to North Vietnam faith and imports from third countries, of Chinese products in which all Chinese interests had ceased were embargoed. Since mid-1954 the policy with respect to exports of nonstrategic goods to Eastern by December 17, 1950. In U.S. import statistics, goods of Chinese origin are credited to China regard- European areas has been liberalized to some extent. In particular, a less restrictive policy with respect less of the last country from which they were shipped. to Poland has been pursued since August 1957, and with respect to Rumania since July 1964. On April 26, 1956, a general license was established authorizing the export without a validated license of Source: 83d Quarterly Report-lst Quarter 1968 "Export Control," by the Secretary of Commerce certain commodities to Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, to the President, the Senate, and the House of Representatives. PAGENO="0022" 454 Mr. Do~fINIcK. Just to summarize, in 1067 we exported to Eastern Europe and Communist areas in Asia $105.1 million worth, and imported from them $170.8 million worth. These are fairly substantial figures, particularly for countries of that type, which do not have the economic resources we have. It seems to me the adoption of the amendment would at least encourage a study of a potentially useful tool. I say once again, we would be engaging in a trade restriction, or embargo, or whatever Senators may wish to call it, against the countries which would have maximum influence on North Korea. I have put into the amendment the words "partial or total trade embargo," so that the President could determine what type of approach he would prefer, if any, and its extent. The words "all or any" of the Communist countries would permit the President to select one or more countries for its application. He has complete freedom, in the review, to pick the countries he wants to have the trade embargo against, or to say, "We are not going to do it at all." I must say that I fail to see why this type of program should be objectionable in any way to a single member of the U.S. Senate. I just do not understand it. Mr. SPARKMAN. Mr. President, I am ready to yield back my time. Mr. MCGEE. Has time on the amendment been yielded back? Mr. SPARKMAN. Unless the Senator from Wyoming objects. Mr. MCGEE. I have no objection. I want to use some time. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Who yields time? Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, a parliamentary inquiry. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator will state j:t Mr. DOMINICK. If we yield back the remainder of Our time, and the Senator from Wyoming puts in a substitute amendment, which I understand he intends to do, who will be in charge of opposition to the substitute? The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Chair advises the Senator from Colorado that the Senator from Alabama would have charge of that time. Mr. DOMINICK. I shall be happy to join forces with the Senator from Alabama. The PRESIDING OFF[CER. Is time yielded back? Mr. DOMINICK. I yield back the remainder of my time. Mr. SPARKMAN. I yield back the remainder of my `tinie. The PREsIDING OFFICER. All time on the Dominick amendment is yielded back. The Senator from Wyoming is recognized. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I send to the desk a substitute for the amendment now pending before the Senate, and ask for its consideration. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment will be stated. The LEGISATIVE CLERK. The Senator from Wyoming [Mr. McGee] proposes, as a substitute for the pending amendment and in lieu of the language thereof, the following: "On page 17, between lines 1 and 2, insert the following: "`CHAPTER I-PoLicy "`SEC. 101. Section 102 of chapter I of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, which relates to the statement of policy, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following: "`"It is the sense of Congress that the President should promptly review and submit to Congress a program for establishment of total trade embargo with the North Korean Peoples Republic in order to assist our efforts to obtain the release of the crew members of the U.S.S. Pueblo from the North Korean Peoples Republic."'" "Redesignate the succeeding sections of part I of the bill accordingly." Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, the purpose of this amendment is obvious. It is designed to supply an opportunity for those Senators who are equally and intensely concerned with me about the men on the Pueblo to cast a vote for the men on the Pvebio, and express their concern by doing something about it. The substance of this amendment is very little different from the substance of the amendment agreed to yesterday, in terms of the economics involved. In the amendment that we adopted yesterday, there was no foreign aid money involved in connection with any of the communist countries that were mentioned. Yet we passed an amendment in `this body, by a rather substantial margin, which suggested that all aid to those Communist countries should be shut off until the men of the Pueblo were freed. Since there was no money involved, this' social and psychological amendment was aimed simply at saying we were for helping the men on the Pueblo. A great PAGENO="0023" 455 many of us in this body believe it is important that we not right now entangle that motive with other facets of American foreign policy as it affects the many different kinds of Communist countries around the world, especially at this moment, when we find cracks in the wall among the satellite nations. This is not the time when we should be trying to close those cracks. It is a time when we should be supplying psychological motivation to those countries that are be- ginning to slip away from the central domination of one center of control- Moscow-not trying to drive them back under the aegis of that monolith. For that reason, I think it is equally important that those of us who voted "nay" yesterday because we did not believe that amendment had any justified place in our policy right now should have an opportunity, in the same kind of setting, to vote for helping the men on the Pueblo, and still not jeopardize our policy efforts to split the Communist phalanx around the world. That is the burden of my amendment. I ask for the yeas and nays. The yeas and nays were ordered. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MCGEE. I am happy to yield to the Senator from Vermont. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, I would like to say that, up until now, I have opposed all amendments to the foreign aid bill, even though I did net agree, in committee, with all of the provisions of the bill as reported but I felt that the final result was as good as we could do. However, my resistance has about given out, and I wish to say that I shall vote for the amendment offered by the Senator from Wyoming, if he offers it, because I think it will have the most practical force of any that has been offered up to this point. Mr. MCGEE. I thank my friend from Vermont. Mr. President, I am ready to yield back my time. The Senator from Alabama has control of the opposing time. Mr. SPARKMAN. Mr. President, does the Senator from Colorado desire time? Mr. DOMINICK. Yes.' Mr. SPARKMAN. I yield my `time to the Senator from Colorado. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I shall use 5 minutes, to begin with. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Colorado is recognized for 5 minutes. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I just wish to say that what the Senator from Wyoming is, in effect, suggesting is a unanimous vote by the Members of the Senate to say, "We are all in favor of the men on the Pueblo who are held by North Korea." Of course we are. No one has said anything to the contrary. This substitute of the Senator from Wyoming is completely meaningless. If I may have the at- tention of the Senator from Wyoming, I think he would admit it. In July 1950 we embargoed all trade with North Korea. We have continued that embargo. it is on the `books; it is a part of the law. So the Senator's substi- tute `does not mean `anything. If he wants a vote to show everyone being in favor of the members of the crew of the Pueblo, fine; I have no objection. But let us have it as a separate vote, and not on a substitute for an amendment which might give us at least the hope of some kind of program for getting something accomplished to fortify our position at the talks in Panmunjom. Mr. MoRSE. Mr. President, who has the time in opposition to the amendment? Mr. SPARKMAN. The Senator from Colorado has the time. Mr. DOMINICK. I am happy to yield to the Senator from Oregon. Mr. MORSE. Mr. President, I am against both amendments, for these reasons: We just do not know what the facts are. I pray to God `that the Pueblo was always in international waters, but we cannot get the State Department or the Pentagon to tell us today they are sure she was. That is why it is so important that we seek some kind of international investigation of this matter. The Senator fro'm Wyoming now proposes an amendment that would slap an embargo' on North Korea. Mr. President, we are dealing with irresponsible leaders. We do not know what they will do. They are beginning to say that, unless they get some concession from the United States on the basis of their allegations that our ship was not in international waters, they will discipline or punish those men. I think we had better keep our eyes on the men. If we want to get themu out, I do not think this kind o'f action is going to help us at all. We are dealing with irresponsible Communists. They are not concerned about getting the world into a war. We are, and I think what we ought to be doing is PAGENO="0024" 456 asking Russia and some of the other Communist nations to join in agreeing upon an impartial international commission, see if they can get North Korea to accept such an international commission, and go in there and make an investigation. We need a finding of fact, with the assurance that, if they will agree, we will agree to have such an international commission make an investigation. If they find we were in national waters, then we are in an entirely different format for a settlement. If they find we were not in national waters, then we are in a differ- ent international format for a settlement. What worries me about both of the amendments is that they might be pro- vocative, and the people who will suffer in the first instance will be the men themselves. I think we ought to leave it to the State Department and ask them to change their proposals and try to get some international commission to take jurisdiction for an investigation and we would abide by the results. Mr. PASTuRE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. Moasa. I yield. Mr. PASTORE. Mr. President, I could not agree more firmly with the Senator from Oregon. Negotiations have been going on-secret, private, diplomatic nego- tiations. I would not be at all surprised that neutral countries have been brought into the negotiations. Today we are being swayed by emotion, not by commonsense or rationality. These things sound very good in the saying. However, we do not know what the far-reaching effects will be. We will accomplish nothing. Such a threat may re- lieve a Senator's feeling-but it does not release the 82 men of the Pueblo. We are not doing business right now with North Korea. I do not know what aid we are giving to Communist countries. We had a vote on not giving foreign aid to Communist countries unless the crew of the Pueblo was released. We are not doing that. These things have a flair and sound brave. We are arousing the emotions of people with further ideas that can only bring frustration and disappointment. We have made our ges- ture-now let us leave it to the experts. If we want to do the right thing and the sensible thing, we will keep quiet. We will keep our mouths shut at this moment and let those who have the re- sponsibility, the authority, and the means to negotiate do so unhampered by us. That way lies the present safety of our men of the Pueblo-and their future freedom. Mr. CLARK. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. McGnu. Mr. President, I yield 2 minutes to the Senator from Pennsylvania. Mr. CLARK. Mr. President, I would like to address a question to the Senator from Oregon, with whose views I have great sympathy. My problem is that some Senators who took that position and voted against the amendment of the Senator from Colorado-which was plainly silly-~were licked and the amend- ment is now in the bill. If we reject the amendment of the Senator from Wyo- ming, we are stuck with the silly amendment of the Senator from ColoradO, and what can we do? We have both of them, except that the amendment of the Sena- tor from Wyoming is not silly. Mr. Mousx. Mr. President, will the Senator yield me 1 minute? Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I yield 1 minute to the Senator from Oregon. Mr. MoRsE. Mr. President, the Senator had better try to take what he has and try to kr~ock it out in conference. Mr. SYMINGTON. Mr. President, I would make one point clear with respect to the amendment of my good friend, the Senator from Colorado, who I know is completely sincere in his approach to this matter. The amendment in my opinion would hurt rather than help our chances of getting back the Pueblo crewmembers. That belief is the reason I shall oppose the amendment of the a:ble Senator from Colorado. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President. I think we ought to keep the record straight here. I could not agree more with the Senator from. Oregon. We have no business trying to make policy on the floor of the Senate that wrould affect something as ticklish as releasing the men of the Pueblo. crew. My reason is that we had an amendment pending. We had an amendment of a similar type which was over- whelmingly agreed to last night. It is my intention in offering my amendment as a substitute to give the Members of the Senate a chance to vote the same way for the men on the Pueblo without having to foul up any worse the whole problem of diplomacy in terms PAGENO="0025" 457 of cracking the solid front among the Communist nations around `the rim of the Soviet Union. My amendment is offered in an attempt to lessen the wave of this kind of reaction on the floor of the Senate. I am willing to withdraw the amendment if the Senator from Colorado will withdraw his. If he cannot withdraw his, then I insist on keeping my amendment as the pending substitute for the amendment of the Senator from Colorado. Mr. MoRsE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I yield 1 minute to the Senator from Oregon. Mr. Monsu. Mr. President, I have not the slightest question about the good intentions of the Senator's motivations or about the motivations of the Senator from Colorado. I just completely disagree on the desirability of passing anything. Therefore, I shall vote against the amendment of the Senator from Wyoming, and I shall vote against the amendment of the Senator from Colorado, too. I think that is the way to resolve it-pass neither amendment. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I am prepared to yield back all time, if the Senator from Colorado is. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I take the floor to say to the Senator from Pennsylvania that I am getting a little tired of his characterizations. And I say that directly. I do not think he is the sole hub of all intelligence in the U.S. Senate or elsewhere. Nor do I think he has the right to characterize amendments dealing with a serious subject as being silly. Mr. CLARK. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. DOMINICK. No. I will not. Mr. CLARK. Mr. President, I thank the Senator for his courtesy. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, the arguments that have been made on the floor ignore the fact `that the amendment I propose has been totally changed. It does not declare a policy as to whether we should or should not cut off trade with countries. What I ask is that the President consider this and send us a program if he thinks it will be helpful. I must say that I cannot see any real problem with that type of amendment. I do see some real problems involved in the substitute amendment which the Senator from Wyoming sent to the desk. We already have an embargo on trade with North Korea. And, as a result, it does not add anything to existing law. It does have the effect, obviously, if it is carried, of killing my amendment. I recognize that. I can understand that this may be his objective. We would do better by having a straight vote as to whether Congress will ask the President to determine whether a trade restriction of some kind ~vill give us a little more leverage. This is the subject of conversations I have had with various people. They have advised me that the possibility of using this as leverage had not been discussed. Today the Senate has had a discussion, and to that extent I think it has been helpful. However, over and beyond that, it has merit, particularly if we find that there are items for which the Communist countries are seeking an export market. Mr. CURTIS. 1~ir. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. DOMINICK. I yield. Mr. CURTIS. Mr. President, I respect the views of all Senators. I particularly respect the views of those who voted against the Dominick amendment last night. I rise to point out, however, that there is a vast difference between what the Senate did last night with respect to the Dominick amendment and the McGee substitute amendment that is now pending. Under the existing law, assistance can be given to a Communist country. The President could use that as a lever. The majority voted to withdraw that possibility. In connection with the McGee amendment, that provision is already in the law. There is an embargo against North Korea. It is not even in the realm of possibility. I believe the Senator from Colorado has rendered a real service here. I do not think it is silly. I think he is sincere. I believe the Senator has put his finger on some avenues that do not carry risk, but may be of some material help. I think the Senator is entitled to a vote on his amendment and I do not think we should agree to the substitute which, on its face, would accomplish nothing, because it is in the existing law. Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, the Senator from Florida is on the other side of this matter. Let the Senator from Colorado yield him time. PAGENO="0026" 458 Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. President, I am not on the side of the Senator from Colo- rado either. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I yield 5 minutes to the Senator from Florida. Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. President, I certainly do not impugn any Senator's motives. I know we all have the same motives and good objectives in this matter. Any of us would give any of our possessions to help to relieve the plight of the officers and men of the crew of the Pueblo. I believe everybody knows that. I do not have to vote "yea" or "nay" on any motion to satisfy anybody that that is my motive, because I know it is my motive, and I know my people know it is my motive, and I know everybody in the United States has the same view; and they realize every Senator has that view as a patriotic American. Mr. President, I voted against the well-intentioned amendment of the dis- tingui~hed Senator from Colorado last night. I shall vote against-if we come to that point-the well-intentioned amendment of the Senator from Colorado today. I shall also vote against the amendment-and it is a well-intentioned one-of the Senator from Wyoming. I believe the Senator from Oregon has pretty well stated my position to a degree, but the Senator from Missouri has added very largely to my position; because, as a matter of fact, we all know these actions, if taken, are apt to hurt rather than to `help. Mr. President, why did I vote against the amendment of the Senator from Colo- rado last night? For various reasons, `but for one reason that has not been men- tioned in the Record. That reason is this: If one of these independent Communist nations-there are three or four of them, and I think particularly of Yugoslavia- were `helping us to the utmost of its ability to get the Pueblo and her crew re- leased, and if their release `by the North Koreans were not accomplished, we still would be unable to extend any help or friendly hand to Yugoslavia under the meaning of that amendment. `There is no question about. If one reads the amendment, he will find that would be the result. With respect to the amendment of today offered by the distinguished Senator from Colorado, it, `too, would bring into play action again'st all the Communist nations, `as `if they were of one `mind, and present history indicates very clearly that they are not, and it would bring into play our economic relations with all of them; and we are not in the same si'tuation with reference to all of them. As distinguished Senators `have said we `have `had for some years `an embargo against North Korea, or against trade with North Korea, so that the proposal here is meaningless, even as made by the distinguished Senator from Wyoming. So, Mr. President, I believe we are toying with a field that cannot do anything but harm to the efforts of our officials who, with all their means, are doing their best to release the officers and men of the Pueblo. `My hope is that we shall adopt neither of the amendments pending at `this time. I say again th'at I do not question in the slightest that the best of motives prevail `in the mind of `the Senator from Colorado and equally in `the mind of the Senator from Wyoming, but I do not believe it is wise to adop't such amendments. As a `matter of fact, I deplore greatly the fact `th'at we adopted yesterday the amend- ment that was `offered, with the `best of motives, by the Senator from Colorado. I believe we are playing with something we have no business playing with, and we are playing with it without knowing the facts `and without having in our possession the tools to do any good by ad'opting these amendments. I hope the Senate will reject-I am sorry to have to say this-the substitute amendment offered with such good motives and supported so eloquently by the distinguished Senator from Wyoming; an'd then, having done that, I hope the Senate will reject, likewise, the amendment offered `with equal good motives and with equal eloquence by the distinguished `Senator from ~olorado. We have no place in this `bill for this type of amendment. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, we must keep one `thing in mind, in response to the Senator from Nebraska, and that is that the difference between the pending pro- posal of the Senator from Colorado an'd the embargo th'at we already `have on `the books against North Korea is a simple one. The difference is that the embargo against `North Korea was a fiat embargo against an enemy nation since 1950, because of the Korean war. But `the Senator from Colorado has attached to it this language: "to assist our efforts to obtain the release of the Pueblo." This is the `incriminating addition in his proposal. This is what sets it apart from the existing legislation. It is not the amount of trade that we have with North Korea. It l's the attempt to insert this as one of the complicating factors in the freeing of the men of the Pueblo. PAGENO="0027" 459 I repeat that I wanted no part of any of this, and I say to the distinguished Senator from Florida that I had no intention of offering anything about the PAeblo on the floor of the Senate. I do not believe it is any of our business, in terms of meddling with the delicate negotiations now taking place. But `because of the surprising success of the `Senator's amendment which was adopted last night, and because it appeared to me `that the same kind of `approach would meet with simila*r success this afternoon, it seemed to me `that we had to do something to take the Senate out of the business of muddying th'ose waters; and that is the only reason for my proposal. So I renew my offer `to the Senator from Colorado: I will withdraw my su~bsti- tute amendment if he will withdraw his amendment. I believe it would be better for the Senate if neither amendment is on the books. May I `ask the Senator from Colorado if he would consider that `withdrawal? Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent tha't there be a quorum call, with the time to `be taken out of the time on the bill. Mr. MANSFI~D. Mr. President, I think we `should get on with bill. I believe we should have a vote on these matters. Mr. MousE. Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum. The PRESIDING OFFIcuR (Mr. Moss in the chair). Is there objection? The Chair hears none, and it is so ordered. The clerk will call the roll. The assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll. Mr. MANSFIELD. M'r. President, I as'k unanimous consent `that the order for the quorum call be rescinded'. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered. Mr. MANSFiELD. Mr. Presideiit, I yield 5 minutes on the bill to the distinguished Senator from Washington [Mr. Magnuson] to file a conference report. * * * * * * * The Senate resinned the consideration of the bill (H.R. 15263) to amend fur- ther the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes. Mr. MCGEE. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to withdraw my substi- tute amendment and the yeas and nays that had `been `ordered `thereon. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there `objection? The Chair hears no objection. The amendment is withdrawn and the order for the yeas and nays is withdrawn. Mr. DOMINICK. Mr. President, I appreciate the consideration of the Senator from Wyoming [Mr. McGee] and the very great cooperation I have received from th'e Senator from Alabama. I believe the potential of economic leverage is an important proposal. I hope the Committee on Foreign Relations will `hold `an executive committee hearing shortly on `the situation with regard to the Pueblo in an effort to obtain as much information with respect thereto as possible. I think a hearing of this type would be of interest to' Senators. Pursuant to my agreement with the Senator from Wyoming, I ask that my amendment (No. 922) be withdrawn. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment i's withdrawn. [Reprint from Congressional Record, May 4, 1967] THE AMERICAN ASSEMBLY-EAST-WEST TRADE Mr. JAvITs. Mr. President, late last week the American Assembly, an affiliate of Columbia University dedicated to the discussion an'd refinement of major national policies, issued a report, "The United States and Eastern Europe," which I strongly recommend for the consideration of the Senate. The report is important because it lends the prestige of the American Assembly in support of policies which are under attack in this co'untry today by many organizations and individuals who find it difficult to understand how the United States can advocate building bridges to Eastern Europe while we are fighting Communists `in Vietnam. But these policies are not inconsistent-we fight where necessary and propose to use our resources to improve relations with Eastern Europe via every possible channel, when possible, and as long as possible. The report upholds this position. Of particular importance are the assembly's proposals with respect to East- West trade. He recommends that: PAGENO="0028" 460 First. Congress should eliminate all legislative and procedural controls over trade in noustrategic items with Eastern Europe more restrictive than those of our allies, so that trade relations may become normaL Second. American trade with Eastern Europe in nonstrategic items should remain primarily the responsibility of American businessmen. Credit Should follow the customary commercial patterns of trade, with Government guarantees when appropriate. `Third. The Congress should provide the President with the authority to extend nondiscriminatory `treatment to imports from any Eastern European state when he determines such a step is in the national interest. Fourth. With our Western European allies, we should encourage the active participation of the Eastern European states in the United Nations a's well as in international institutions, such as OE'CD, GATT, and the aid c'onso'rtla of the World Bank. These proposals make a great deal of sense and I urge my colleagues to give these proposals as well as the report their closest consideration. I ask unanimous consent that the report of the 31st American Assembly, April 27-30, 19~7, including the' li'st of the participants, be printed in th'e Record at the conclusion of my remarks. I `also ask unanimous consent that the sober and well-reasoned addre~ss of Averell Harriman on the background and justification for current U.S. policies toward Eastern Europe be printed in the Record at this point. There being no objection, the report and the address were ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows: [Report of the 31st American Assembly, April 27~~-3O, 19671 TEE UNITED STATES AND EASTERN EUROPE PREFACE The TJJn4ted States and Eastern Europe was the subject of the Thirty-first American Assembly, which met at Arden House, on the Harriman (N.Y.) campus of Columbia University, April 27-30, 1967. Persons prominent in busi- ness, education, government, communications, labor, agriculture and the clerical, legal and military professions-numbering 71 in all-discussed in depth, in small groups, the important social, political, and economic issues between the United States and the "iron curtain" countries of Eastern Europe: Poland, East Ger- many, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, and Albania. At the end of their discussions the participants met in plenary session to review, and approve, the report which follows on these pages. A background volume for the discussions was prepared under the editorial supervision of Professor Robert F. Byrnes of Indiana University, with chapters and authors as follows: 1. The La'nd and Peoples in History-Stephen D. Kertesz, University of Notre Dame. 2. Internal Politics and Political Change in Eastern Europe-Alvin Z. Ruben- stein, University of Pennsylvania. 3. Economite Modernization~-Nicholas Spulber, Indiana University. 4. Social Forces and Cultural Changes-R. V. Burks, Wayne State University. 5. Eastern Europe in the Communist World-Kurt L. London, The George Washington University. 6. Europe, East and West-John C. Campbell, Council on Foreign Relations. 7. American Opportunities and Dilemmas-Robert F. Byrnes. Regional Assemblies on this subject, making use of the `above named chapters and of American Assembly conference techniques, will meet across the nation with the cooperation of other educational institutions; and if it seems feasible an Eastern European-American Assembly will be held somewhere in Europe. The report which follows reflects the collective view of the participants in their private, not their official, capacities. The American Assembly itself, a non-par- tisan educational organization, takes no position on matters it presents for public discussion; and The Ford Foundation, which generously provided support for the Thirty-first American Assembly program, similarly takes no official posi- tion on the opinions contained herein. CLIFFORD C. NELSON, President, the American Assembly. PAGENO="0029" 461 FINAL REPORT OF THE THIRTY-FIRST AMERICAN ASSEMBLY (At the close of their discussions the participants in the Thirty-first American Assembly on The United States and Eastern Europe reviewed as a group the fol- lowing statement. The statement represents general agreement; however no one was asked to sign it, and it should not be assumed that every participant neces- sarily subscribes to every recommendation.) INTRODUCTION Eastern Europe continues to be highly important to the United States. This region, long identified with the main currents of Western history, has contributed as well to our own national development. The changes in Eastern Europe over the past decade afford opportunities to the United States, in concert with West- ern Europe, to devise policies which promote the aspirations of the East Eu- ropean peoples, and contribute to international order. The policies now required must have the wisdom, understanding, and support of the American people. Clearly the future of the countries of Eastern Europe should be determined by the peoples of those countries themselves. United States policy toward Eastern Europe must also take into account the character and tone of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union and between the Soviet Union and Com- munist China. This policy will also be affected by developments in other parts of the world, such as Southeast Asia, and by other issues which require American attention and resources. There is no inconsistency of purpose in working for improved relations with Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union at the same time as we oppose communist aggression in TTiet Nam and other parts of the world. Both policies are instruments designed to promote peace and freedom. The core of American policy must remain the maintenance of national security, political vitality, and a readiness to use our resources with skill and resolution for the establishment of world order. We must remember that the progress of some of the states of Eastern Europe toward national independence has been influenced by American strength and policy, the existence of institutions such as NATO and the European Common Market, and the firm Western position in West Berlin. The diversities among Eastern European countries, both in their domestic and international affairs, suggest that there is no single or simple policy for us or for them. While continuing to pursue our active interest and role in Eastern Europe, the United States must recognize the fact that the peoples of Western Europe are closer in culture and in space than we to the peoples of Eastern Europe and will play a leading role in relations with that area. The revival of national feeling, progress at varied levels and varied rates of speed toward greater autonomy and liberalization, the magnetic attraction of a revitalized West, and the pressures created by economic growth and resultant technological needs-all provide the United States and Western Europe the opportunity to assist the peoples of Eastern Europe toward a freer and more productive life. We should develop the means to pursue this opportunity in closer consultation with Western Europe, both within and outside NATO, than is the case at present. The experience of Yugoslavia in the past two decades has illustrated both the possible political and economic evolution on the part of an Eastern European communist state and the mutual advantages flowing from normal and cooperative relations between such a state and those of the Western World. American atti- tudes and policies which have contributed to such trends continue to be relevant to developments in Eastern Europe. In formulating long range objectives, we should take into account the forces contributing to change in the countries of Eastern Europe: a. the move of these peoples toward national independence and responsive self-government, and their desire for the benefits of modernization, with the future character and form of each people's political and social system ex- pressing its own individuality; b. their desire to restore the traditional friendships `between Eastern Europe and Western Europe so that the peoples of Europe as a whole may play a more important and constructive role in world affairs. America'n policy should be so formulated and administered as to assist the spread of these changes in the communist world. PAGENO="0030" 462 We seek evolution, not revolution. Therefore, the manner and style in which we execute our policies and seek these great goals are almost as important as the policies themselves. In pursuing these objectives during the period of uncertainty, any policy, even a policy of doing nothing, is fraught with dangers. The proposals which follow are made with the understanding that no one can anticipate the future con- fidently and that accidents and the efforts of others may thwart our best designs. Frustrations might arise from the nature of the communist regimes, complexi- ties of the German issue, the powerful Soviet position in Eastern Germany, and the reluctance of the Soviet Union and the regimes of Eastern Europe to permit fundamental change. While it may be argued that some of these proposals could have the effect of solidifying communist rule, rather than encouraging forces which will relax and modify the system, the evidence of the last ten years supports the latter judg- ment. Finally, our policies, indeed any policies one could propose for this area, assume that the American people will have the good sense and patience to support the East Europeans in a process whiëh will inevitably last a long time. PROPOSALS 1. The United States should maintain and strengthen its relationships with the peoples of Eastern Europe, build common interests with them, and encourage them to resume a responsible role in world affairs. National independence for these countries is a prerequisite to policies of interdependence which are funda- mental to the solution of international problems. 2. Our relationships with the Soviet Union should be taken fully into account in shaping our policy toward Eastern Europe. While searching for a stable Euro- pean settlement, we should at the sam.e time strive to reduce tensions in Europe so as to decrease the dangers of war. We should seek to prevent a new race for anti-ballistic missile defenses, press for a nonproliferation treaty, and seek other means of arms controL Under existing conditions, such far-reaching approaches as neutralization of Germany or the establishment of atom-free zones in Europe, would not contribute to a satisfactory European settlement. 3. Germany and German reunification remain central to our policy for Europe. a. We should increase our level of interest and concern with Germany and with Europe. We should ensure that West Germany remains confident of the continued support of the United States and its allies for the unification of Germany. b. Our policy suggestions do not include East Germany, the situation of which is different from that of the Eastern European states. There seems to be no immediate prospect for a plebiscite within Eastern Germany regarding reunifica- tion of Germany, but the desire for national unity persists. c. We should, with the Federal Republic be prepared to accept the Oder-Neisse line as the boundary between Poland and a reunited Germany when the com- munist powers are prepared to withdraw from the Elbe. d. We welcome Western Germany economic and diplomatic agreements with the countries of Eastern Europe. 4. The United States welcomes the reestablishment of closer relations between Eastern and Western Europe and the exj~ans'ion of West European cultural and technological contacts. The changing situation in Eastern Europe affords new opportunities for mutually beneficial economic relations, especially trade. a. Congress should eliminate all legislative and procedural controls over trade in nonstrategic items with Eastern Europe more restrictive than those of our allies, so that trade relations may become no~nal. b. American trade with Eastern Europe in non-strategic items should remain primerily the responsibility of American businessmen. Credit should follow the customary commercial patterns of trade, with government guarantees when appropriate. a. The Congress should provide the President with the authority to eatend non-discriminatory treatment to imports from any Eastern European state when he determines such a step is in the national interest. 5. With our Western European allies, we should encourage the active partici- pat'ion of the Eastern European states in the United Nations as well as in inter- national institutions, such as OECD, GATT, and the aid consortia of the World Bank. 6. The vitality of Western culture has a powerful attraction for the peoples of Eastern Europe. Individual Americans, foundations, universities, learned sod- PAGENO="0031" 463 eties, religious groups, trade unions, community organizations such as World Affairs Councils, and the government alike should all contribute in their own way to increasing the reciprocal flow of ideas, people, publications, and artistic works. We propose: a. The expansion of exchange programs, particularly with opportunities for a richer intellectual development for East European leaders from the most impor- tant fields of activity and study. b. New emphasis upon arrangements for continuing cooperative work of groups here and in Eastern Europe on common problems, such as air pollution and medi- cal research. c. The sharing of knowledge in areas central to modern life, such as business management, public administration, and nonstrategic technology, to help speed the transformations already underway in those countries. d. Expansion and improvement of English language instruction and of sys- tematic study and knowledge of the United States in universities, and of libraries in the United States. e. Continuation and enlargement of our efforts to provide accurate news and cultural programs via Western radio and television stations, and an increased flow of Western publications into Eastern Europe. 7. The historic cultures of these peoples have enriched American life. In spite of the impressive achievements of the last two decades, knowledge and under- standing of Eastern Europe in the United States remain inadequate. Universities should continue and the private foundations should expand their investment in research, instruction, and publication concerning Eastern Europe. Programs of the International Education Act should include attention to these goals. PARTICIPANTS-THE 31ST AMERICAN ASSEMBLY George V. Allen, Director, Foreign Service Institute, Department of State. Frank Aitsehul, Vice President, Council on Foreign Relations, New York. Nils Anderson, Jr., President, Devevoise-Anderson Co., New York. Paul B. Anderson, Consultant on Eastern Europe to The Executive Council of the Episcopal Church and N.C.C., New York. F. K. Arthur, Jr., Publisher, Monterey Peninsula Herald, California. R. W. Askanase, Chairman, Dunhill International, Inc., Houston. Emile Benoit, Professor of International Business, Columbia University. Meyer Bernstein, International Affairs Director, United Steelworkers of America, Washington, D.C. Thomas C. Bostic, President, Cascade Broadcasting Co., Yakima, Washington. Lawrence Broadwell, Harriman Scholar, Columbia University. R. V. Burks, Professor of History, Wayne State University. Robert F. Byrnes, Director, International Affairs Center, Indiana University. tJohn C. Campbell, Council on Foreign Relations, New York. *Jeffery Cohelan, Representative from California, Congress of the United States. Guy Coriden, Deputy Director, Office of European Programs, Bureau of Educa- tional & Cultural Affairs, Department of State. Alexander Dallin, Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Relations, Co- lumbia University. Richard T. Davies, Assistant Director (Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) U.S. Information Agency. Vera Micheles Dean, Professor of International Development, New York Uni- versity. Rev. William H. Dickinson, Highland Park Methodist Church, Dallas. Dudley P. Digges, The $un, Baltimore. tWalter Dowling, Director General, The Atlantic Institute, Paris. John B. Fisher, Consultant to Congress, Washington, D.C. Julius Fleischmann, Chairman, Fleischmann Foundation, Cincinnati. Walter Friedenberg, Scripps-Howard Newspaper Alliance, Washington, D.C. A.R. Gale, President, International Business Development Co., Cleveland. Richard N. Gardner, Henry L. Moses Professor of Law and International Orga- nization, Columbia University. *Deliverecl address. tDiscussion leader. PAGENO="0032" 464 George Garvy, Economic Adviser, Federal Reserve Bank, New York. Stanley T. Gordon, International Affairs Program, The Ford Foundation, New York. ttJames Gould, Foreign Area Fellowship Program, New York. David L. Guyer, Vice President, Institute of International Education, New York. *~T Averell Harriman, United States Ambassador at Large. Milan Herzog, Vice President, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Educational Corpora- tion, Chicago. Paul M. Herzog, President, Salzburg Seminar in American Studies, Austria. ttGeorge W. Hoffman, Professor of Geography, University of Texas. Norman 0. Houston, Chairman, Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Co., Los An- geles. James Kagen, Harriman Scholar, Columbia University. Stephen D. Kertesz, Professor of Government, Notre Dame University. William R. Kintner, Deputy Director, Foreign Policy Research Institute, Phila- delphia. Allan B. Kline, Western Springs, Illinois, Josef Korbel, Dean, Graduate School of International Studies, University of Denver. Tom Lilley, Director, Export-Import Bank of Washington. G. A. Lincoln, Colonel, USA, Chairman, Department of Social Sciences, United States Military Academy, West Point. Raymond E. Lisle, Director, Eastern European Affairs, Department of State. K. L. London, Director, Institute for Sino-Soviet Studies, The George Washington University. Richard B. Lynch, Rear Admiral USN, Chief, European Division, Plans and Policy, Joint Staff, Department of Defense. Edwin A. Malloy, President, Fred F. French Investing Co., New York. Philip Mosley, Professor of International Relations, Columbia University. Zygmunt Nagorski, Foreign Policy Association, New York. I. A. Ocher, President, The American Welding & Manufacturing Co., Warren, Ohio. Christopher H. Phillips, President, U.S. Council, International Chamber of Com- merce, New York. - Frederick A. Praeger, Publisher, New York. John Richardson, Jr., President, Free Europe, Inc., New York. Scovel Richardson, Judge, United States Customs Court, New York. James Q. Riordan, President, Mobil Oil Corporation International, New York. Hugh J. Rosellini, Judge, Supreme Court, State of Washington, Olympia. Alvin Rubinstein, Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania. lowland H. Sargeant, President, Radio Liberty Committee, New York. ttAlbert J. Schmidt, Chairman, Department of History, University of Bridgeport. Harry Schwartz, Editorial Board, The New York Times. *~farshall D. Schulman, Professor of International Politics, Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University. Sister Mary Grace, C.S.C., President, St. Mary's College. J. E. Slater, Program Officer in Charge of International Relations, The Ford Foundation. Philip Sporn, Chairman, Systems Development Committee, American Electric Power Co., New York. Irving Stone, Author, Beverly Hills. Shepard Stone, Advisor on International Activities, The Ford Foundation. Theodore C. Streibert, Executive Secretary, Citizens Committee for Higher Edu- cation in New Jersey, Princeton. Theodore L. Thau, Executive Secretary, Committee on Export Policy, U.S. De- partment of Commerce. f Kenneth W. Thompson, Vice President, The Rockefeller Foundation, New York. Edward Vernoff, Harriman Scholar, Columbia University. A. G. Ward, Admiral, USN, United States Representative, Military Committee, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Washington, D.O. Watson W. Wise, W. W. Wise Drilling Co., Tyler, Texas. *Deljvered address. IDiscussion leader. t~Rapporteur. PAGENO="0033" 465 ABOUT THE AMERICAN ASSEMBLY The American Assembly was established by Dwight D. Eisenhower at Columbia University in 1950. It holds nonpartisan meetings and publishes authoritative books to illuminate issues of United States policy. An affiliate of Columbia, with offices in the Graduate School of Business, the Assembly is a national educational institution incorporated under the State of New York. The Assembly seeks to provide information, stimulate discussion, and evoke independent conclusions in matters of vital public interest. AMERICAN ASSEMBLY SESSIONS At least two national programs are initiated each year. Authorities are re- tained to write background papers presenting essential data and defining the main issues in each subject. About 60 men and women representing a broad range of experience, com- petence, and American leadership meet for several days to discuss the Assembly topic and consider alternatives for national policy. All Assemblies follow the same procedure. The background papers are sent to participants in advance of the Assembly. The Assembly meets in small groups for four or five lengthy periods. All groups use the same agenda. At the close of these informal sessions participants adopt in plenary session a final report of findings and recommendations. Regional, state, and local Assemblies are held following the national session at Arden House. Assemblies have also been held in England, Switzerland, Malay- sia, Canada, the Caribbean, South America, and the Philippines. Nearly ninety institutions have cosponsored one or more Assemblies. AMERICAN ASSEMBLY BOOKS The background papers for each Assembly program are published in cloth and paperbound editions for use by individuals, libraries, businesses, public agencies, non-governmental organizations, educational institutions, discussion and service groups. In this way the deliberations of Assembly sessions are continued and extended. ARDEN HOUSE Home of The American Assembly and scene of the national sessions is Arden House, which was given to Columbia University in 1950 by W. Averell Harri- man. E. Roland Harriman joined his brother in contributing toward adaptation of the property for conference purposes. The buildings and surrounding land, known as the Harriman Campus of Columbus University, are 50 miles north of New York City. Arden House is a distinguished conference center. It is self-supporting and operates throughout the year for use by organizations with educational objec- tives. The American Assembly is a tenant of this Columbia University facility only during Assembly sessions. THE AMERICAN ASSEMBLY-COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Trustees: Dwight P. Eisenhower, Honorary Chairman, Pennsylvania. Arthur G. Altschul, New York. George W. Ball, District of Columbia. William Benton, Connecticut. Courtney C. Brown, cx officio, New York. William P. Bundy, District of Columbia. Josephine Young Case, New York. John Cowles, Minnesota. George S. Craft, Georgia. Douglas Dillon, New Jersey. Marriner S. Eccies, Utah. Thomas K. Finletter, New York. Arthur S. Flemming, Oregon. Katharine Graham, District of Columbia. Alfred M. Gruenther, Nebraska. W. Averell Harriman, New York. 97-627-68-pt. 2-3 PAGENO="0034" 466 J. Erik Jonsson, Texas. Grayson Kirk, ax officio, New York. Allan B. Kline, Illinois. Sol M. Linowitz, New York. Don G. Mitchell, New Jersey. Clifford C. Nelson, ex officio, New Jersey. Officers: Clifford C. Nelson, President. James H. Berry, Secretary. Olive B. Haycox, Treasurer. Mary M. McLeod, Assistant to the President. Chairman Emeritus: Henry M. Wriston, New York. ADDRESS BY THE HONORABLE W. AVERELL HARRIMAN, AMBASSADOR AT LARGE, AT THE 3lsr AMERICAN ASSEMBLY, ARDEN HousE, NEW YORK, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1967 THE UNITED STATES AND EASTERN EUROPE IN PERSPECTIVE United States relations today with Eastern Europe are still being shaped by past events, attitudes and policies. The states of central Eastern Europe came into being as a result of the Versailles Conference. They were established in deference to a political principle, national self-determination, with little con- sideration of economic realities. As a result, these nations suffered serious eco- nomic difficulties. The greatest tragedy was Vienna-a head left without a body- with unmanageable unemployment. The leaders of the new countries made gal- lant efforts, with some success particularly in Czechoslovakia and Poland, to overcome the dislocations and construct viable economies. Another significant development of the early twenties was the network of treaties encouraged by France known as the Cordon Sanitaire, intended to create a buffer against the inroads of Bolshevism. An abrupt change `in attitude occurred on the day the Nazis invaded Russia in June 1941 when Churchill accepted the Soviet Union as an ally. The early discussions between the Soviet Union and the British and ourselves related largely to immediate considerations of the war-military strategy and supply matters to help the Soviet Union withstand the Nazi onslaught. From October 1043, the time of the Moscow Conference of Foreign Ministers, the political problems of the post-war Europe were increasingly discussed, with particular concentration on the future of Eastern Europe. By that time it was already apparent that the Red Army would occupy these countries as it forced the invading Nazi armies back to Germany. In this conference, however, Mr. Hull was primarily interested in reaching agreement with the Soviets on the over-all declaration of principles, expressed in the Moscow Declaration. This he felt would form a basis for detailed decisions at a later time. Mr. Eden's approach was the more direct one of attempting to reach understandings on specific issues. At that meeting, he proposed a confederation of Eastern Eu- ropean States, a plan that had been tentatively approved by Sikorski and Benes. He hoped this federation would create political as well as economic strength in Central Europe, and could overcome the weakness which the dismemberment of the Hapsburg empire had created. But Molotov would have none of it. He piously cloaked his rejection with what he called the need to await the "result of a free, peaceful and well-con- sidered expression of the will of the peoj~le." The Soviets made it plain that they would not permit the reconstruction of any new Cordon Sanitaire, and they showed little respect for what they called "the emigre governments" in London. We got the impression that the Soviets wanted a fragmented post-war Europe consisting of small weak states throughout-easily dominated by the Soviet Union. A month later at Tehran, Churchill sought Stalin's agreement specifically re- gardthg an independent Poland. Stalin responded by demanding a revision of the Riga Treaty boundary, which the Soviets had always considered unjust. He referred to the prior British proposal of the Curzon line as' being a more correct ethnic division. He offered compensation to Poland at the expense of Germany. From then on, Poland became the primary political topic of discussion be- tween the British and ourselves and the Russians. Hitler's invasion of Poland bad brought Britain into the war, and Poland was a country with which many PAGENO="0035" 467 Americans were especially concerned. Under instructions from President Roose- velt, I talked about Poland with Stalin more frequently than any other subject. I recall, one time in the late winter of 1944, opening a discussion with Stalin by saying that President Roosevelt had asked me to talk to him about the future of Poland. Stalin replied, "The Poles, the Poles-can't you think of anything else to talk about but the Poles?" He asserted that Poland had always created (hf- ficulties for Russia and that it was the invasion corridor through which Western European armies had attacked Russia. Since Poland was so important to Russia's security, he could not see why we did not leave the future of Poland to the Soviet Union. Stalin insisted that they must have a "friendly neighbor." I explained to Stalin that American public opinion would not support a U.S. Administration that failed to protect the right of these peoples to determine their own future. Stalin's reply amazed me. He said that he had his own public opinion to think about-that the Ukrainians and the Byelorussians wanted to be re- united with their brothers in the areas that had been unfairly taken from them. As Stalin was blunt, I could be also. I suggested that Stalin was in a position to take care of public opinion in the Soviet Union. His reply was revealing. He maintained that he had to pay constant attention to public opinion since, he ex- plained, "We have had three revolutions in a generation." In other words, Stalin regarded suppression of counter-revolution as his primary concern in dealing with Russian public opinion. The talks continued. In October 1944 Churchill brought the London Polish leaders with him to Moscow, hoping thereby to reach an understanding. Finally, at Yalta in February 1945, an agreement was reached, not only for Poland, but for all of the states of Eastern Europe. Through the Declaration for Liberated Europe, as well as the Agreement on Poland, the Soviet Union undertook to work with the British and American Governments to assure the holding of free and unfettered elections, with all democratic, non-Fascist parties having a full right to participate. The unhappy fact is that Stalin failed to keep his Yalta Agreements. It is hard to understand why Stalin should have made agreements at Yalta, and then broken them so soon thereafter. One explanation, which I am inclined to believe, is that he had expected that the Red Army would be welcomed as the liberator from the Nazi tyranny, and that, in the first blush of this enthusi- asm, a Communist-dominated government could be elected. Perhaps this explains why at Yalta he had proposed elections within one month of liberation. Beirut, the leader of the Lublin Poles, was in Moscow when Stalin returned from that conference, and he niust have learned from him that in Poland a free election could not be trusted, that the Red Army was being regarded as a new invading force. The historic fear and distrust of Russia was still paramount in people's minds. This proved true in other countries as well. Later, in the summer of 1945, for some reason free elections were permitted in Hungary which exposed the fact that the Communist Party there had little popular sup- port. It could only command 17 percent of the vote. The fate of Eastern Europe in the immediate post-war period was sealed by the presence of the Red Army. The effort of Churchill and Roosevelt at Yalta to come to an agreement with Stalin failed, but that effort in itself had the value of exposing Stalin's perfidy and aggressive intentions to the world. It is important to recall that the U.S. did not accept for several years the inevitability of conflict with the Soviet Union. It is well to keep in mind that even as late as June 1947 General Marshall in his famous Harvard speeeh of- fered assistance to all of Europe-including the Soviet Union. However, Molotov walked out of the conference convened in Paris to consider the offer, and the Soviets compelled Poland and Czechoslovakia to reverse their preliminary deci- sion to participate. The Iron Curtain, which Ohurchill had described, caine down to divide Europe-with a bang that all could hear-and the cold war was inten- sified. American opinion had been slow to accept the split. It was hard for Americans to understand that the Soviet leaders after all the tragic losses of the war would not want to cooperate in rebuilding a peaceful world. It is significant to recall that after Churchill's Fulton speech, his hotel in New York was picketed and he was met with student demonstrations at Columbia where he was given an honorary degree. Many of these people were not extremists. They hated war. A Foreign Serv~ice officer with whom I have worked closely in recent years con- fessed to me that he had taken part as a student in the demonstration at Co- ium~bia in the belief that Churchill was fanning war emotions. PAGENO="0036" 468 In the intervening twenty years, certain events have tended to exacerbate our conflict with the Soviet bloc; the Berlin blockade, the North Korean attack, the Cuban missile crisis and the Soviet's continuing support for so~cailed "Na- tional Liberation movements" in South America and elsewhere. But other events have tended to ameliorate the tensionS. Stalin's hopes for a monolithic structure of international communism have been shattered. The accord between Moscow and Peking, though never complete, has been ruptured, seemingly beyond repair. Tito's break with Stalin has encouraged the other Eastern European countries to force a loosening of Moscow's domination. It is well for us to remember that although we had nothing to do with Tito's break with Stalin, there is no doubt that our military and economic help made it possible for him to maintain his independence. Another favorable trend has been the changes within the Communist countries themselves which have somewhat eased the most rigid controls, making easier contacts with the West. When m 1955 Khrushchev welcomed Tito back into the folds, Tito insisted on retaining complete independence-Political, military, economic and ideological. Tito has continued the development of his relations with the West to the point where 65 percent of his foreign trade is with the Free World and only 35 percent is with the Soviets and the Eastern European bloc. Trade between Western and Eastern Europe has steadily increased in non- strategic items. Throughout the period we and our allies have maintained what is known as a Cocom list, controlling shipments of products that are considered Of strategic value. In addition, cultural exchanges and mutual tourism have substantially in- creased. The larger numbers, of course, go from the West to the Ea;st. Not only Yugostavia's Dalmatian Coast, but Bulgarian and Romanian Black Sea beaches are attracting large numbers of Western European vacationists. However, Hun- gary, for example, permitted 244,000 of their citizens to visit non-Communist countries in 1058. Each of the Eastern European countries has in its own way undertaken to reduce the rigidities of Communist economic control. The economic difficulties faced by Communist countries have compelled them to experiment with ways to decentralize management and increase incentives. Controls were never ~s complete in the Eastern European countries as in the Soviet Union. The most striking example is agriculture. In Poland, for instance 87 percent of the land remains in the hands of the peasants. In the new experiments, Yugoslavia has shown the way in breaking down central direction of the economy. Step by step individual enterprises, controlled, in theory at least, by the workers, have been forced to compete with one another. Bank credits have replaced government provided funds. Each enterprise must earn its right to exist by producing a profit. Also the need to expand exports has compelled these enterprises to meet foreign competition as well? This has led Yngoslavia to join GATT in August 1966 and to welcome private foreign invest- ment in their industry. It is still too early to judge how this will work. Although the Communist Party in Yugoslavia still controls the ideology and policy of the Government, it is planning to give up its detailed direction of gov- ernment operations. Politically, the Assemblies of the local Republic as well as the Federal Assembly in Belgrade are assuming greater responsibility. In Sb- venia last December a cabinet submitted its resignation when it lost an Assembly vote on a health insurance bill. But the Communist Party still dominates politi- cal expression as is evidenced by Mihajlov's recent conviction. The other countries of Eastern Europe are undoubtedly watching with fasci- nation events in Yugoslavia. There can be no doubt that Yugolavia's example will be followed if it is successful, even though at a more cautious pace. TJnf or- tunately, our ability to help Yngosla'via at this critical period has been checked by the adoption of Congress of the ill-considered Findley and Belcher Amend-. ments. The greater success of Yugoslavia has with its experiments in the freeing of its economy, the greater influence its example will have on the other coun- tries of Eastern Europe. The increasing complexities of the Soviet economy are also compelling Moscow to experiment with new methods of decentralization and incentives. Their econ- omists are studying the methods of the U.S. and Western Europe, in an attempt to understand the reason for the extraordinary post-war Western economic suc- cess which has belied so dramatically the predictions of Stalin's economists of the early economic collapse of the West. In Moscow one no longer hears such predic- tions. PAGENO="0037" 469 In fact, I was interested in the attitude of one of the senior Soviet economists in a conversation I had with him the last time I was in Moscow. He complained that too many of the Americans he met were specialists on the Soviet economy. He wanted to talk instead to "the specialists on the American economy." In no sense am I suggesting that the Communist one-party system is breaking down. Irreversible changes, however, are taking place, and this includes to a small degree, at least, freedom of expression. Control of individual thought and expres- sion seems to be the last stronghold to which the Communists are clinging even though the demand for more freedom is growing in strength. Some criticism is permitted and the strict insistence on socialist realim in art has been relaxed. However, those who have the courage to overstep the bounds of "propriety" in their attack on the current regimes or Communist doctrine are severely punished. The American attitude, particularly in Congress, toward Eastern Europe has adjusted itself haltingly to the changes that have taken place. President Johnson has appealed to the country to undertake building bridges to the East, and in his October 7 speech to the National Conference of Editorial Writers he brought into focus the interrelationship of our European policies. In referring to the unnatural partition of Europe, he warned that Europe must be made whole again if peace is to be secure. He stated: "Our purpose is not to overturn other governments, but to help the people of Europe to achieve: "A continent in which the peoples of Eastern and Western Europe work shoulder to shoulder together for the common good; "A continent in which alliances do not confront each other in bitter hostility, but instead provide a framework in which West and East can act together in order to assure the security of all." "in a restored Europe, Germany can and will be united." The distance the U.S. has lagged behind Western Europe in bridge building to the East is clearly shown by the trade figures. Whereas the trade between Western and Eastern Europe, exclusive of the Soviet Union, was over 5 billion dollars in 1965, the U.S. trade was less than 200 million. Under these circumstances, it doesn't make any sense for us to continue to restrict trade in non-strategic goods as we have been doing. This self denial is achieving no useful purpose. We are simply losing business to Western European competitors and creating a lot of unnecessary ill will. Over the years, Congress has placed restriction on restriction. Crippling amend- ments have been added to essential legislation which Presidents could not afford to veto. Even today there is danger that ultraconservative Congressmen may at- tempt to further damage our national interests by offering amendments to such legislation as the Export-Import Bank Charter renewal, handicapping its useful- ness in expanding trade. The effect of legislation has been compounded by rigid bureaucratic interpretations. President Johnson has reversed some of these bu- reaucratic interpretations. He has reduced export controls with respect to hun- dreds of non-strategic items and he has authorized the Export-Import Bank to guarantee commercial credits to selected countries. Incidentally, the President has most wisely authorized the Export-Import Bank to help finance the purchase by Fiat of 50 million dollars of machinery for in- corporation into their project in the Soviet Union. This project will undoubtedly increase the pressures by the people on the Government for more automobiles, with all the diversion of resources that that will entail. Every family I have met throughout the Soviet Union longs for an automobile and the release that that will give them. The President has also taken other steps within his authority, but legislation is essential before we can begin to encourage a reasonable flow of trade. The proposed "East-West Trade Relations" bill, if approved by Congress, would authorize the President to extend most favored nation tariff treatment to individ- ual Communist countries when he determines this to be in the national interest. This authority would be ewercised through a commercial agreement wit/v a particular country for a period of not more than three years. Aside from the export of strategic items which would, of course, remain prohibited, the trade itself would depend on the decisions of individual private firms. The President would have the power to suspend or terminate sue/v commercial agreements if he deter- mied that the other party was not living up to its obligations, or if he determined that suspension or termination were in the national interest. Communist China, North Korea, North Viet-Nam, Cuba and the Soviet Zone of Germany are specifically excluded by the provisions of this bill. PAGENO="0038" 470 The people of Eastern Europe want to expand contacts with the West. In fact, they feel that they have more in common with the West than with Russia. They particularly long for better relations with us. The individual family ties with the U.S. are still close. But more than that, to Eastern European's, the U.S. exemplifies a better life. They seek not only technical knowledge `and products, but also personal contacts and the opportunity to visit the U.S. Hopes of improved relations `with the U.S. have been encouraged by the de- creasing threat of hostilities in Europe. This has, of course, also' influenced the people `of Western Europe, and has led to a demand for the re-thinking of NATO's role. The receding fear of war has given impetus to the desire of Western Europe for less dependence on the United States, and a sense of greater independence. I do not see why we should `be overly concerned by the natural development, but we niust take into account this change in psychology and appreciate its sensitivities. `There are certain principles, however, that we must clearly continue to sup- port in Western Europe. `Since the Marshall Plan, encouragement of the inte- gration `of Western Europe h'as been one of our foremost policies. Our concern for the reunification of Germany must remain our firm policy as `an essential means to achieve eventual E'uropean sta'bility. The `basic security interests of the North Atlantic Community must `be safeguarded, `but detailed arrangements must be modernized to meet changing conditions. Except for France, the `other 14 members of NATO have agreed t'o maintain integrated forces, but we are `also exploring together ways in `which NATO' can enlarge its activities, including the field of East-West relations. The President has given `encouragement to the development of common policies in this area. Obviously, trade agreements and other detailed matters will be dealt with through `bilateral understandings. However, all except France agree that the NATO nation's must stand together to prevent the Soviet Union `from succeeding in fragmenting Western Europe again, and to concert policies in East-West relations. Although nationalism among the nations of Eastern E'urope has led to the'ir demand for greater independence from Moscow, there is reason for our recog- nizing that cooperation among the countries of Eastern Europe can contribute to the health of the entire `continent. The President clearly recognized this when he pointed out `that the alliances provide a framework in which West and East can act together in order to advance common interests and assure the security of all. The hope that the peoples of Western and Eastern Europe can work together for the common good can only `be realized if both accept the existence of each other's political systems and avoid interference in ea'ch other's internal affairs. Yet progress denends in no small degree on the `development of `more open societies in the East. These `changes can only come from within, but they can be encouraged by our rea'diness to cooperate. Increased Eastern European participation in various internationral economic organizations should be encouraged. Yugo:slavia already is a member of the World Bank, the IM'F, the International Development Association, and GATT. The UN E'conomi'c Commission for Europe can be made more effective in furthering East-West re'lations. WTe should attempt to get Eastern Europe as well as the Soviet Uni'on to cooperate in the immense and pressing task `of assisting the developing nations, perhaps through association with the OECD and its sub- committee, the DA'C. At best, progress can be m'ade only on step-by-step basis. We must rea'lize that the outw~ard thrust of international communism is not dead. With all o'f the Soviets' protestation's of peaceful coexistence, the Soviets still support "national liberation movements" and claim that so-called "wars of national liberation" are just. They call upon Eastern European Communist parties to d'o the Same. I have had an opportunity to discuss this question bluntly with Soviet `leaders, and although they are pragmatic in `considering methods of achieving pro'duction, they `still hold rigidly to the concept that communism will eventually sweep the world. Although I doubt that they are prepared to take the risks their predecessors did, and they certainly do not wish to face nuclear war, they `will take advantage of any o~ening in any part of the world to expand the influence of communism. There is no s'ecret about this activity. The Communist press reports the actions taken at the internatiom~al `conferences held in Havana that blatantly call for PAGENO="0039" 471 "intensification of all forms of the struggle, including the armed struggle of the peoples of the three continents (of Asia, Africa and Latin America) ". Eight Latin American countries, including such democratic countries as Venezuela and Peru, have been specifically named `as targets for "organized revolution and violence". They even call for "resolute aid * * * `for the struggle for the in- dependence of Puerto Rico"! A Pravda editorial has supported these actions, stating: "The Soviet people * * * regard it * ~ * as their sacred duty to give support to the peoples fighting for their independence" and referred to the ter- rorists as "the Latin American patriots." It is hard for a Westerner to understand how the Communists can maintain that we are the imperialist aggressor when, for example, we help the freely- elected Government of Venezuela in its efforts to stamp out the terrorist move- ment that is responsible for acts of sabotage `and murder. They consider that we are attempting to block the inevitable trend of history. They contend that the small group of terrorists is, in fact, speaking for the people. One must understand that they still think in terms of the handful of Bolsheviks who arrived in Petro- grad in April 1917 and within six months took over control of the country and have been "speaking for the people" of Russia ever since. Nothing we say or do today will change that conviction. Developments within the Soviet Union, and particularly Eastern Europe, have tempered the ardor of the international revolutionary spirit and have made the Soviets more con- servative in undertaking risky actions. This trend will probably continue, and I feel they will be less and less ready to invest in foreign adventures as time goes on. Improved relations between East and West can speed that day. This is the answer to those who ask why we should improve relations with the Communist countries while they are giving assistance to North Viet-Nam in its aggression against the South. Whether we like it or not, the Governments of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe consider North Viet~Nam as an allied Communist country, and believe it is their duty to support it when it is engaged in a conflict. Certainly, the Vietnamese war is making it more difficult to come to agreements with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. But such agreements as we have been able to reach tend to relieve tensions and to encourage the Soviet Union and others to use their influence to end the conflict. I am satisfied the Soviet and the Eastern European Governments would like to see the Viet-Nam war ended. They believe it contributes primarily to Peking's interests, and they do not want a confrontation with us. They want stability in Europe. The Soviets want to make progress in the control of nuclear weapons and want to be able to reduce military expenditures. Their resources are already strained, and they would like to devote more of their resources to improving the living conditions which their people are demanding. But we must expect them to continue to give assistance to a sister Communist country, North Viet-Nam, which they consider an overriding obligation. With our differences in ideology, we must expect continuing frictions in one place or another. We cannot today expect an ultimate settlement. But we can expect the gradual breaking down of barriers, improvement of relations, more areas of common agreement. If we are wise enough to pursue the opportunities as they unfold, we will certainly hasten the day when we can hope for a viable settlement in Europe- "a continent", as the President has suggested, "in which the peoples of Eastern and Western Europe * * * work shoulder to shoulder together for their com- mon good". [Excerpt from the Congressional Record, Mar. 27, 1968J Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, on behalf of the distinguished occupant of the chair [Mr. Byrd of Virginia] and myself, I call up amendment No. 671. Mr. MANSFIELD. Mr. President, may we have order? The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator will suspend until order is restored. The Senate will he in order. Mr. M~JNDT. We have made one or two minor modifications in the amendment, one of which corrects a typographical error. I ask unanimous consent that our amendment, as modified in conformity with our instructions, `be read. Mr. AIKEN. May we hear the modifications? Mr. MTJNDT. I send the amendment to the desk and ask that it be read, as modified. PAGENO="0040" 472 The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment will be stated. The ASSISTANT LEGISLATIVE CLERK. At the end of the amendment, insert the following new section: "SEC. -. Special 20 percent surtax on taxpayers trading with certain Commu- nist countries "(a) In addition to any other tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1054, there is hereby imposed on every taxpayer who during the taxable year has engaged in export trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam, a tax equal to 20 percent of the taxable income of the taxpayer for the taxable year. "(b) The tax imposed by subsection (a) shall not apply for any taxable year to any taxpayer who submits to the Secretary of the Treasury or his delegate a statement under oath that he has not engaged during the taxable year in trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam. "(c) Terms used in this section shall have the same meaning as when used in the Internal Revenue Code of 1054. "(d) This special 20 percent tax shall cease to be applicable when the United States is no longer engaged in armed couffict with North Vietnam (whether or not there has been a declaration of war) ." Mr. MTJNDP. Mr. President, first of all, this is the third test of our senatorial position on trading with the enemy in war time in which the distinguished Sena- tor from Virginia has been the leader and in which I have been associated with him. We have tried-successfully on two other occasions-to stir up support re- flecting our responsibility to the boys overseas to do something to discourage prof- iteering by American exporters who are supplying raw material and finished products to the Soviets and their satellite countries which today, as I shall state in my prepared remarks, are solely responsible for the fact that the war is continuing now, because they are supplying all the petroleum and sophisticated weapons and much of the rest of the materiel which enables the North Vietnamese to prolong the fighting which has brought about these terrifying casualties of killed and wounded, and which stoke the fuels of obstinacy which keep Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh from coming to the conference table to negotiate a legitimate settlement to the war. Mr. AIKEN. Mr. President, will the Senator yield to clarify the wording of his amendment at this time? Mr. MUNDT. I yield. Mr. AIKEN. It is my understanding that this 20-percent tax is to be imposed upon any taxpayer engaged in export trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam. That means the 12 or 13 countries which are generally recognized as being Communist countries. Mr. MUNDT. There are not quite that many Communist countries actually en- gaged in supplying the Government of North Vietnam. We have a list of those countries. We know exactly which ones they are. And any exporter can learn by a letter to his Government in Washington the exact identity of the countries involved. Mr. AIKEN. This penalty would not apply to those trading with France and England? Mr. MUNDT. It would not. Mr. AIKEN. It would not apply to any countries which are not considered to be Communist? Mr. MUNDT. These are not the countries engaged in shipping the implements of war. Some non-Communist countries are shipping food, and so forth. However, the MIGs and the other sophisticated weapons are shipped from the Commu- nist countries. Three of them are centered around Russia and Eastern Europe. Mr. AIKEN. Is Russia the sole shipper of these goods? Mr. MTJNDT. No. The same Communist countries, as the Senator well knows, from serving on the Committee on Foreign Relations, have been very successfully arming Nasser and Egypt, so that another war in the Mideast is being ignited. Mr. AIKEN. The pending amendment would also apply to those who supply material to people or groups of people, even though the material does not go through the North Vietnamese Government. Mr. MUNDT. As the Senator well knows, under the Communist governments, they have a collectivist economy so that everything does go through the govern- ment. Mr. AIKEN. That was my question. I thought that ought to be made clear. PAGENO="0041" 473 My other question concerns the penalty for trading with the enemy. The penalty `does not apply to trading with the Vietcong or the people of South Vietnam? Mr. MUNDT. I do not know of a single thing which is being sent into South Vietnam under the basis of `trade. It is all picked up from the north, and from Haiphong Harbor and other places by means of truck or railroad; it is then ferried down to the satellites in South Vietnam. There is no way in which the material can be shipped direct to them in South Vietnam. Mr. AIKEN. Is petroleum a war material? Mr. MUNDT. Yes. Petroleum would be covered. Mr. AIKEN. Then, anyone selling petroleum to the Vietcong or to the South Vietnamese people would not be subject to this penalty. Mr. MUNDT. They would not be subject to the penalty for selling it to the Gov- ernment of South Vietnam because it is not a Communist state. It is not the country with which we are at war. However, if they ship it to the Government of North Vietnam and they then ship it to their Vietcong associates, it would be covered. Mr. AIKEN. Would the Senator's amendment apply to the Vietcong or to the people in South Vietnam who are at war with us? Mr. MtTNDT. I would `have no objection to that. I think it is covered, because I do not know of any direct shipments of weapons to South Vietnam to take care of individual Vietcong soldiers in South Vietnam. I think a change would be unnecessary. Mr. AIKEN. It is my impression that the Vietcong are at war with us par- *ticularly, and that they require a large amount of supplies with which to carry on the war. Would the tax penalty apply to any company or person in the United States that sells to the Vietcong or carries on export business within the country with a company which sells to the Vietcong? Mr. MIJNDT. I do not think it is a realistic approach. Mr. AIKEN. I think it is awfully realistic. Mr. MUNDT. There would be a much greater penalty than that on such a transaction because anyone selling to the Vietcong is selling to a nonexistent gov- ernment. The seller could never collect. The material is going to North Vietnam and is being ferried down by truck, railroad, and every other way they can find, to their associates in Vietnam. Mr. AIKEN. I think that the Senator would find there is a very large market at the present time in the bills of South Vietnam for the enormous amount of supplies that they require. Would anybody undertaking to supply them be sub- ject to this penalty? Mr. MUNDT. If the Senator would feel happier and if the Senator from Virginia agrees, that would be all right. I think that it is, however, absolutely unnecessary. We could cover that hypothetical case by saying "supply material to the Vietcong ~or any other people with whom we are at war." Mr. AIKEN. And have it apply to American people. Mr. MuNDT. The Senator is correct. They will be the ones to pay the tax. Mr. AIKEN. Suppose the Vietcong bought a substantial amount of supplies from American companies in Saigon, what would be the situation then? Mr. MTJNDT. The American companies would be subject to the tax. It would be a rather unusual occurrence, but they would be subject to it. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MUNDT. I yield. Mr. MONDALE. A cracking plant is being built in Romania by the United Petro- leum Co., which is a U.S. company. It is nearly completed, and recently I visited it. The plant was built in part because our Government encouraged its construc- tion for many different reasons. I assume that whether the United Petroleum Co. wants to or not there are certain things that the company must continue to do there until the plant is in complete operation. As I read the amendment, the tax would apply to their business. Is that correct? Mr. MTJNDT. I would certainly hope so. Romania is supplying a great deal of the petroleum to North Vietnam without which the war could not continue and without which our boys would not be killed. If they are making that kind of blood money, I would like to see such business covered, and I believe it would be. PAGENO="0042" 474 Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator know the production from that plant is going to Vietnam? Mr. MUNDT. I know that a good deal of the production from Rumania is going to Vietnam. Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator know whether this production is from that particular plant? Mr. MTJNDT. It would not make any realistic difference. If they were to take it through a pipeline, one could not say that it came from that particular plant. However, if we have American oil companies making profit at the expense of boys fighting in Vietnam I think that a 20-percent war profits tax is too small. I hope, however, that the tax will be adequate to make them stop this kind of blood traffic, because war is a serious business. This may be profitable for a few greedy American companies, but it is not profitable for the boys who are fighting in the war. Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator know whether there are any so-called Iron Curtain countries which would not come within this definition? Mr. MUNDT. We get a list periodically, because we have been following this and we have page after page of what is being shipped and by whom. I would assume that a little country like Albania might not have the where- withal to ship or to sell. I do not recall from memory. But if it does, it would be included. Mr. MONDALE. Would it be fair to say that most, if not all, the countries of eastern Europe which are commonly known as Communist countries would probably be included within the definition of this amendment? Mr. MUNDT. It depends upon whether the Baltic States such as Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania, are included. They are Communist countries. They probably do not have enough to eat, and certainly have no war supplies to sell. But it would be fair to say that most of the industrialized Communist countries of eastern Europe would be involved. Mr. MONDALE. The Senator from South Dakota, I am certain, is aware that we annually ship several millions of dollars of agricultural products to Poland. Mr. MUNDT. I am. And they would be included. Mr. MONDALE. The shippers would come within the 20-percent provision of this amendment? Mr. MUNDT. Yes. Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator from South Dakota know of any military uses to which this food would be put? Mr. MUNDT. It is not a. question of military use. I would not expect farmers who send grain to be exempted, any more than people who are selling steel and diamond-pointed oil drills. It all goes to strengthen the economy of an enemy country engaged in supplying Vietnam with the weapons killing our boys in the war. I agree with Bernard Baruch, who said: "When you're in war with an enemy, there are no such items as non-strategic supplies." If you are trying to win, you shut off everything you can. Even shipping food to the enemy frees manpower from the fields in the Communist country so they can turn to the making of weapons of war, to jeopardize the lives of American boys, while a few avaricious people make an extra few dollars profit. I want to tax that profit, and tax it big. Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator from South Dakota have figures which show the types and quantities of military assistance which, for example, Rumania sends to North Vietnam? Mr. MUNDT. I have figures, and if I have an opportunity to deliver the speech I have prepared, the Senator's ears will be ringing with them, if he remains in the Chamber. Mr. AIKuN. May I ask another question? If Rumania buys crude oil and re- fines it and sells the finished product so that any of it goes to hostile countries, would the owners of the plant which produces the oil sold to Rumania, if they were Americans, be subject to the 20-percent tax? Mr. MUNDT. The question sounds somewhat obtuse, the way the Senator has asked it. The language of the amendment reads: "Any country which has engaged in export trade with any Communist country supplying it." If it is of that pattern, they would be taxed. The question is so obtuse that .1 cannot follow whether or not this is an American company. Mr. AIKEN. If the American company was incorporated in one of the Middle PAGENO="0043" 475 Eastern countries and sold the oil to Rumania, would they not be subject to the 20-percent tax? Mr. MUNDT. They would, if they paid an American tax. Mr. AIKEN. If it was American financed. Mr. MIJNDT. That is correct. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MUNDT. I yield. Mr. MONDALE. If this tax were imposed-and it would be a substantial tax- Mr. MUNDT. Twenty percent. Mr. MONDALE. The practical consequences would be, I assume, that most trade involving a U.S. company or a U.S.-owned subsidiary with an Eastern European nation would become competitively unrealistic. This amendment would probably eliminate most, if not all, of this type of trade. Mr. MUNDT. I would hope so. Curiously enough, Communists are willing to pay highly inflated war prices for products they desperately need. Anyone who wants to read profit and loss statements of American companies that are making money from the war should examine what those companies are being paid by the Rus- sians, and he will realize that the companies can pay a 20-percent tax without it hurting too much. That is why we put the tax across the corporate income, not just on war profits. Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator contemplate that this tax-which I agree with him would have the effect of ending virtually all trade between this country and Eastern Europe-would have the effect of denying these commodities to Eastern Europe? Mr. MUNDT. No. As I said before, they will pay fantastically high prices to get these items from this country, which has the curiously indefensible policy of drafting its boys on Monday and encouraging its exporters to sell on Wednesday supplies which next Monday can kill American boys if those supplies happen to wind up in Vietnam. The Communists pay a high price. Why not, when our coun- try can be induced to shoot itself with its own guns? Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator envisage the possibility that this amendment might not deny anything to Eastern Europe, but rather give these customers to our Western Europe competitors? For example, would we lose millions of dollars of trade with Poland and the other countries in agricultural products, the nonstrategic computer business, the petroleum business, the modern toot business related to civilian cars, and other items of that nature? Would not the effect of the Senator's amendment simply be to give all this business to Western Europe? Mr. MTJNDT. Will the Senator describe for me, first, a machine tool useful in making cars which is not useful in making tanks or planes? Mr. MONDALE. As the Senator knows, a small Fiat factory is being constructed in Budapest, and another is scheduled to be constructed in Moscow or just outside of Moscow. Mr. MTJNDT. That one was abandoned because of the Byrd amendment. Mr. MONDALE. The credit was eliminated by that amendment. However, Ameri- can tools are, in fact, a part of the factory, but through other forms of financing. As I understand this amendment, it would not deny a Communist nation any- thing, but just cause them to go elsewhere with their business. Would the Senator agree with that? Mr. MTJNDT. I would not agree with that. Mr. MONDALE. What would they be denied? Mr. MUNDT. A great many of the things they must get from this country which are hard to get, if not impossible to procure, elsewhere. Mr. MONDALE. Can the Senator cite an example? Mr. MUNDT'. Yes. The Worden gravity meter, which is exclusively an Ameri- can product, which we have beemi selling to the Communist bloc. They buy it here because it happens to be an American invention, an American device. It is very useful in killing many American boys, because the enemy needs it to measure the accuracy of its weapon trajectory. That is why they are willing to pay a high price to get these devices. And if they get them here, those who sell them should pay a heavy tax. Mr. MONDALE. If it is used for strategic reasons, then our export system should prohibit it. Mr. MUNDT. The Senator will be shocked to learn what his President has done. One thousand nine hundred items are on the list of selective exports. Ninety- eight percent of the requests have been granted by the Johnson administration. Mr. MONDALE. What are they? PAGENO="0044" 476 Mr. MUNDT. If the Senator will remain in the Chamber until I deliver my speech, I will recite them. Mr. MONDALE. The Senator from South Dakota, I am sure, is aware of the remarkable liberalizing events in the Eastern European countries, notably Yugo- slavia, Rumania, and to some extent Poland, and of more recent data, Czecho- slovakia. These countries, although they still proclaim communism, are demand- ing more and more independence. They are becoming more and more independent from Comicon, which is the Moscow-dominated economic apparatus. They have demanded more independence from the Eastern Europe military apparatus, and they are pursuing `an independent line in international affairs-witness Rumania in the Middle East crisis. It would appear that the only remaining sanction which Moscow enjoys in trying to impose its will upon these countries is the dependence of those countries on the Soviet Union for trade. * It is not just possible that by trying to eliminate trade between this country and Eastern Europe in nonstrategic items, we are not denying them anything because they will go to other sources. Instead, we may be actually contributing to the one thing which remains available to Moscow for control of these Eastern European countries; namely, trade dependence? Would it not be far wiser for us to become more, involved in nonstrategic trade to encourage these nations to shift their economies to the West, and therefore place these countries in a position to pursue a nondependent, nationalistic course in international matters. Mr. MUNDT. I would like to be able to agree with the Senator, but his state- ments leave me on cloud 9. I have heard them enunciated by others before. The position should be explored. We heard a lot of that at the time of the considera- tion of the consular treaty. The Secretary of State engaged in the same hypothe- sis that the Senator has just ventilated: We were told we are making fine progress with the Russians, we are getting to be friends, we ought to move forward and approve the Consular Treaty now because it will cement all of these things. Well, it has been over a year and the Soviet Union has not ratified the treaty yet. They have held us up to public scorn around the world and they have said that they induced us to ratify the treaty, but they have not done so. We are living in a realistic world. These proposed changes are subject to demonstrable truth. In speech after speech and at meeting after meeting the East European Communists said, "We are going to work to provide whatever it takes to assist our comrades in North Vietnam to blow the Americans out of Southeast Asia." That does not sound like a nice Sunday afternoon conversation to me. If there is anything to the hypothesis of the Senator, he should vote for my amendment to test it in the laboratory of life. All the Communist countries have to do is to trade with the United States as voluminously as they desire, and to desist from shipping the weapons of war to Hanoi which are continuing the ugly war in Vietnam and making us the scorn of the world. It is no wonder the free world turns its back on President Johnson and our country when they see us trying to chisel our profits from the shipment of arms while we are drafting boys to be sent to Vietnam. They do not associate with that kind of crass materialistic concept of war. The Senator wishes it were not so and so do I. However, one has to look at the facts of life. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, this morning's New York Times contains an article, which I shall ask to have printed in the Record, describing what went on at the Prague Conference to which the new Czech leaders had been summoned by the more Stalinist leadership in Eastern Europe. It is quite apparent from this story and other sources that this conference was held to try to slow down the forces of nationalism and democracy that were being evidenced in Czechoslovakian life. This story reports that the policy of the Czech Government is to try to restrain the country from the tendencies that are operating in favor of a more stable world. Working in favor of Communist control from Moscow was the threat of economic reprisal based on the present dependency of Czechoslovakia upon the Soviet Union for capital, and raw supplies to run its industry. Does the Senator from South Dakota think that we help the situation by mak- ing the Czechs more dependent upon the Soviet Union, as this amendment would do? Mr. MUNDT. This amendment would not do that. We would help the situation because we make it possible for trade with Czechoslovakia to expand, provided they do not use the trade to join in the arming of the enemy we have in North PAGENO="0045" 477 Vietnam. That is all there is to our proposal, whether they are friendly or unfriendly. I do not accept the New York Times as an authority on what happened in Czechoslovakia any more than I accept what they say in connection with Vietnam, because they say we cannot win the war and that we ought to pull out. One of the Senator's colleagues from Minnesota agrees with them and another colleague of the Senator from Minnesota disagrees with them. I am not going to put the Senator on the spot but I am not going to get confused by the New York Times. Does the Senator have other questions? Mr. MONDALE. I thank the Senator. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to have printed in the Record at the end of my remarks and not during the colloquy, an article entitled "Czechs' Concern Over Bloc Rising" which was published on page 10 of the New York Times this morning. The PRESIDING OFFICER [Mr. Spong in the chair]. Without objection it is so ordered. (See exhibit 1.) Mr. SMATHERS. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MUNDT. I yield. Mr. SMATHERS. Would the Senator be interested in having the present manager of the bill accept the amendment and take it to conference on a voice vote? Mr. MUNDT. I would have to talk with my colleagues. I am a little more inter- ested in having a rolicall vote because I know the House conferees will be obstinate about it. They were pretty stubborn when we had the Byrd amend- ment on the Fiat Motor Co., and they were stubborn when we had the next amendment on the curtailing of the right of the Export-Import Bank to loan American funds to finance trade over there. If it is worth doing at all it is worth doing right. I shall insist on a roilcall vote. Mr. SMATHERS. Very well. I wish to ask the Senator a couple of questions that occur in trying to make this an amendment. that could be enforced. For example, the amendment provides: "(b) The tax imposed by subsection (a) shall not apply for any taxable year to any taxpayer who submits to the Secretary of the Treasury or his delegate a statement under oath* that he has not engaged during the taxable year in trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam." Mr. MUNDT. Which is supplying material to the government of North Vietnam. Mr. SMATHERS. Very well. Supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam. That would require every taxpayer in the United States to comply with this provision for an oath. Is that the intention of the Senator? Mr. MIJNDT. The provision means there would be an affidavit such as there is on a joint income tax return that involves social security. There would be one more statement to check to state that you are not doing it. Mr. SMATIIERS. I gather that it is the intention of the Senator to have every taxpayer who fills out his tax form to swear under oath. I guess the taxpayer would have to go to a notary public and say that he has not been doing any business with Communist countries. Mr. MUNDT. It would be the same kind of indication that is made in connec- tion with other matters on the Internal Revenue tax return. Mr. SMATHERS. That is, just a statement. Mr. MITNDT. Subject to perjury. Mr. SMATIIERS. This proposal might become law. What does the Senator mean? Mr. MUNDT. It is a fair question. There would be one tiny square following a short sentence at the bottom of the page which would say, "Have you been shipping to any Communist country or trading with the enemy?" The taxpayer would check the square marked "No," just as he now checks a square to indicate whether be is 65 years of age or over. It would not take more than a second of any taxpayer's time at the most. Mr. SMATHERS. If this bill should become law, as far as legislative history is concerned, it is the intention of the Senator that the taxpayer would not have to file an oath. Mr. MUNDT. The Senator is correct. PAGENO="0046" 478 Mr. SMATHERS. The taxpayer would only check the square. Mr. MUNDT. That would be right. I would want it subject to the same rules of perjury as the other parts of the income tax return. Mr. SMATHERS. But all taxpayers would do that, including taxpayers who work in the Capitol cleaning up the dishes. Mr. MUNDT. It is very important but it is only a little scratch of the pan. I would think that anyone would be delighted to put an X in the square and to save 20 percent of the tax required of those unable to do so. I know I would. I wish I had a lot of checks to make like that in this era of high taxation. Mr. SMATHERS. In other words, another section would be required to fill out on the tax return, with a question such as "Did you or did you not trade or do any business with a country which is doing business with the Communists?" Mr. MUNDT. Along with all the other X's we will be filling out on our income tax forms between now and April 15. We will be making a great many of them, but none of them gives a 20-percent tax saving as this one would. i~Ir. SMATHERS. Then, if a person did say that he was not doing business with a Communist country, at that point there would have to be some more lines on the income tax form where they would figure out the 20 percent of the $1,000 tax, and figure that in it. In other words, we would lengthen the income tax return which we file, would we not? Mr. MUNDT. I would not think so. We might broaden it instead of lengthening it. It would be but a small sentence in a small box. Mr. SMATHERS. When the Senator refers to supplying material to Vietnam, over what period of time Is that? Mr. MUNDP. During the taxable year. Mr. SMATHERS. That is not in here. Mr. MTJNDT. Yes, it is. Mr. SMATHERS. The Senator would be willing to take care of that during the taxable year, I assume? In, other words, legislatively- Mr. MUNDT. Line 6 it is on. Page 1. Mr. SMATHERS. As to whether a man is engaging in trade with any Communist country, that would be upon the taxpayer. How about when the Communist country supplies the material? Does the Senator have any limitation on that? Mr. MUNDT. Only as long as we are at war. We are now at war. It could not be ex post facto on this. It has to be during the taxable year, or in futuro. We cannot write legislation backward. Mr. SMATHERS. The Senator's idea is to have this apply from the time it becomes law-if passed-that is, thereafter. In other words, we would say there- after, if any trade was engaged in. Mr. MUNDT. That is correct. Mr. SMATHERS. Then we should put the word "thereafter" in here. Mr. MUNDT. It does not need it because we cannot write, constitutionally, cx post facto laws. Mr. SMATHERS. Say that a fellow finally sold something to a Communist coun- try this year, but he did not know whether it actually was a Communist country, is that dealt with here? A Communist country dealing eventually with Vietnam say 2 years later? What do we do about that? Mr. MuNDT. It says on page 2, line 5, "which is supplying," and that brings it to the present. ~Mr. SMATHERS. All right. :50 then he would not be prosecuted in the first in- stance if he supplied the material in 1968 and they did not supply it to Vietnam until 1970, if that war is still going on-which we hope it is not. But what hap- pens at that point? Will such a man be prosecuted, or what? Mr. MUNDT. I would not think it would be occurring during a taxable year, but if he developed a lush customer over there and he continues to supply that cus- tomer, then he would get caught with the tax. Mr. SMATHERS. One could be sympathetic with the idea that the Senator is trying to bring out, but I am hopeful that we would not undertake a measure of this nature which really leaves much to be desired in the manner in which the amendment has been drafted. I have no criticism to make of my friend because I know it was drafted probably in a hurry. Mr. MTJNDT. No complaint against the legislative counsel. either. The Senate's legislative counsel had to do it quickly. If the amendment is adopted-as I cer- tainly hope it will be~-and it. goes to conference, the technician~ will be able to take care of any quibbles that the technicians are now raising on the floor of the PAGENO="0047" 479 Senate because they can get to the meat in the coconut. Just like fly specks on a sheet of music, they will be ascertained and removed so that the musical no- tation will be clear to all. In other words, that we see to it trading with the enemy is stopped or severely penalized. Mr. SMATHERS. Does the Senator know the number of countries supplying ma- terial to Vietnam? Mr. MIJNDT. I do not know them all. I know some of them. Our Government certainly knows them all. The taxpayer could be kept advised. We can put an order on it. We can get it. Mr. SMATHERS. Well, if the Senator does not know completely, how is the tax- payer supposed to know? Mr. MTJNDT. It will take longer than I thought, but we will get to it. I have a list of those countries showing where supplies to Vietnam come from. Mr. SMATHERS. My question is~-and I do not want to be understood as being against what the Senator is trying to do-~just what countries are sending materials of war to Vietnam. How is the taxpayer suppose to know? Mr. MTJNDT. A 6-cent stamp will take care of it. If the man is an exporter, he will find out anyhow as to the legality of it, and a letter to the Department of Commerce in Washington will produce the entire list. Mr. SMATHERS. Well, suppose Albania-I do not know this-is supplying ma- terial to Vietnam. Mr. MiJNDT. They have got a record of it. Anyone could get it upon request with a 6-cent stamp. Mr. SMATHERS. Then he will get a letter back saying "we are not trading with Vietnam." Mr. MUNDT. He can go to the Tax Court. He does not have to worry if the Com- merce Department wrongly advises him. Mr. SMATHERS. What about a partnership? Suppose we h~ive a partnership where one member is trading with Albania, and the other partners know nothing about it. Does the action of the one partner taint all the partners? Are they all to be subject to the tax? Or just the one that traded with Albania? How does the amendment work in that case? Mr. MTJNDT. I am not sure what kind of partnership it would be. It might be limited. But that fellow Who made that kind of deal, he would be liable. Mr. SMATHERS. If the other partners had no knowledge that some of their business was with a country supplying material to Vietnam, then they would not be subject to the tax, is that right? Mr. MUNDT. That would be a decision of the Internal Revenue Service and the Tax Court. I cannot make legislative history on the floor of the Senate to meet every imaginary contingency. Mr. SMATHERS. Well, legislative history is made on the floor of the Senate is it not? Mr. MUNDT. Right. I have said that the partner who knows about the trading would be taxed. The rest would have to prove their total ignorance. It could happen. That is why partnerships seem to be going out of style these days and corporations are becoming more popular because so many people get caught with bad partners quite often. Mr. SMATHEES. What happens if some goods are sent to a country in good faith, say to Britain, and then transferred by that country, or some intermediary to someone in Albania who, in turn, will send it on to Vietnam? Mr. MUNDT. They would be in the clear, if it is sold to someone in a country whi~h is not Communist. We can approach those problems later on in the session with a different approach. This is the first step. Mr. SMATHERS. Then all that this would really require, if a person wants to do business, and not pay the additional tax would be for him to send his products through an intermediary, say in Lichtenstein, and let the goods find their way to Albania and then to Vietnam. Thus, once a product was sold to a non~Oommunist country in good faith, those who made the sale would not be subject to the ad- ditional tax under the Senator's amendment; is that not correct? Mr. MUNDT. If they sold it to an entrepreneur in a free country, they would not be guilty. We are not trying to correct all things here. We are trying to find out, really, what is the attitude of the Senate toward whether we want to make this war possible to win or whether we are just talking and complaining about it. I do not believe we will ever bring the war to an end as long as the industrial genius of this country is supplying Communist countries with tIme kind of ma- terial being shipped, knowing that the Communist countries have become the sole PAGENO="0048" 480 reason why they continue to fight in Hanoi. We raise a lot of quibbles and tech- nicalities here. I do not suppose the boys getting shot at with something which has been refabricated from an American exporter is interested in trying to stop it. Mr. SMATHERS. I do not want to get into that aspect of the matter. I have two sons, both of whom served in Vietnam. Thus, I share the sentiments of the Senator from South Dakota. Mr. MUNDT. I know that the Senator does. Mr. SMATHERS. I want to get the war over in Vietnam, as I know the. Sen- ator does. Mr. MUNDT. We have to start somewhere. Mr. SMATHERS. On the other hand, I do not like to see us doing something that does not look very practical. I am afraid, that actually, we may be doing that. If the Senator from South Dakota could supply a list of those countries which are giving aid to Vietnam, it would help, frankly, in making .legsilative history, to warn the taxpayers of this country as to those countries they should not do business with. But my question is, as long as the Senator himself, who has followed this sort of thing very closely, and who is a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, does not know this information, then how is the taxpayer supposed to know it? Mr. MUNDT. The Senator from South Dakota knows enough about it to know that simply putting a list in the Record to indicate that other Communist coun- tries are not included means it is a partial list and it could subsequently be out- dated. I am talking primarily about Russia, Czechoslovakia, Rumania, and Po- land. Those probably are the big four in Eastern Europe. There are undoubtedly others, but they will be published in the Federal Register and they will be made available to the public. There is no mystery about them. We know that the great- est part of this comes out of Russia, because she is the great industrial complex of the Communist world. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. .MTJNDT. I will yield to the Senator from Minnesota if he will associate himself with me when the majority leader comes here and asks if we can limit the time on this amendment, and I have to tell him I have not even bad the op- portunity to read the first paragraph of my prepared speech. The majority leader would like to vote on final passage tonight and I would like to help him. Mr. SMATHERS. Mr. President, if the Sen.ator will yield, how long does he an- ticipate his speech will take? Mr. MUNDT. It is going to take longer now than I originally had anticipated~ because of some quibbling technicalities which have been raised and which must be answered. Mr. SMATHERS. Can the Senator estimate how long he will take? Mr. MTJNDT. No; I do not know how long it will take the Senator from Minne- sota and the Senator from Florida to ask the remaining questions. Mr. SMATHERS. It would be helpful if the Senator from South Dakota could say how long it would take if he would speak without interruption. If we could work out such an arrangement for him in making his speech, how long would he esti- mate it would take? . . . Mn MTJNDT. It would take me some time.. How long, it will take to answer the questions I do not know I had anticipated onginally that I could mal e the whole ease in less than an hour. I see now that is not possible. In . addition the coauthor of this amendment, Senator Byrd, has a speech to make. Mr SMATHERS Does the Senator think he can finish it an hour from now~ Mr. MUNDT. I doubt it. If only two Senators who oppose have taken as long as they have in asking questions and other Senators come to their defense we may be here the rest of the week. Mr. SMATHEES. I do not know that the Senator who has thus far spoken. was opposing the amendment. Mr. MUNDT. That is encouraging. . Mr. SMATEERS. I am just asking the question whether it is. possible for the Senator to accomplish what he seeks to accomplish. Mr. MUNDT. Realizing that there are technicalities involved, and wanting to get on with the general idea, if the Senator would~ be willing to accept it. and~ then let the technicalities be worked out, we could be through here in 30 minutes. Mr. SMATHERS. I have indicated that I would be willing to take it to conference. Mr. MUNDT. That is a good gimmick to use on a freshman Senator, but the Senator knows me well oriough to k~now I would not tale that up1 I thiu1~ ~he~ issue deserves a rolleall vote. PAGENO="0049" 481 Mr. SMATHERS. I would never imply that the Senator from South Dakota does: not know more about parliamentary procedures than I do. Mr. MTJNDT. No, but I have sat on many conferences, and I know how con- ference committees work. If we want to do something about the problem, granted that it is not perfect, granted that it does not cover everything, but that it gives some indication to the people of the country and the people of the world that we are not trying to mix profits with war, that we want to shut off these supplies, that we are giving our help to the war effort, then, fine work, let it go to conference. If the Senate does not want to do this, fine. But I think every Senator is entitled to have a rolicall on his proposals at the appropriate time. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MUNDT. I yield. Mr. MONDALE. I thank the Senator for his patience and courtesy. I have just returned from 3 weeks in Eastern Europe. I am thoroughly con- vinced that this Nation's policy of restricting credit and imposing excessive export controls and other restrictions poison the possibilities of expanded trade with Eastern Europe. It is a self-defeating policy which has actually contributed to control by Moscow over Eastern European countries, slowing down the day when the independent policies of those countries can be asserted. Mr. MUNDT. Will the Senator differentiate in his mind the contributions trade can make to better understanding as between a time of war and a time of peace, between countries which trade in civilian goods, and do not ship mili- tary goods to kill our soldiers in Vietnam, and those that do; or does the Senator think we should treat them all the same? Mr. MONDALE. The first answer to that question is that we are not denying: them anything. I think a proper name of the amendment proposed by the Senator from South Dakota would be the De Gaulle amendment, because President de Gaulle will be delighted if it is adopted. It means that the $200 or $300 million of trade we have with Eastern European countries will be made available to him for his farming and commercial interests. This is also true of West Germany, Italy, and England. So what we probably are doing, in the midst of the balance-of-payment crisis, if we adopt the amendment, is to deny $300 or $400 million in favorabk~ commercial trade in nonstrategic. items and simply give this trade to others,. OUT competito~rs. Mr. MUNDT. Is the Senator really saying-I want him to correct me if I am wrong, but this is the implication-4hat it is all right in time of war for young men to serve their country and leave the farm and leave the school, in the~ neighborhood of 600,000 of them, and let them make that sacrifice, but we should not do anything in any way to curtail the extra income that war profiteers are making because they can sell to a plush Communist market in Russia the war-making supplies which in turn are refabricated or manu- factured and shipped as war material from there? Mr. MONDALE. Does the Senator think it weakens the Communists and strengthens us to inflict on ourselves the denial of markets in Eastern ~iurope for our farm supplies and other supplies, and leave them to France? In what way woes this contribute to the war effort and weaken them and strengthen us? Mr. MUNDT. Because many of the products they want-and I would not give concessions to farmers that I would not give to everybody else-which are approved for shipment and which we send, are goods which are in rather- short supply in other areas of the world. So they come in here and pay the American profiteers fantastically high prices because they have to have them to keep their Russian economy moving at full speed. In a desperate situation, one pays any price to plug up the holes. So it does weaken the United States not to force them to go to less productive markets, where they have less to choose from, where they cannot get such sophisticated machinery as gravity meters, machinery for oil wells, diamond drills, and all the other new and modern tools to be used in the bowels of the earth, which have been developed in this country because of our great oil explorations and oil development here. So those countries can get many things here that they would not get otherwise or elsewhere. We strengthen them by doing that. It is my fundamental position-and this is where we disagree-that we should do nothing to strengthen our enemy; that there is nothing we can sell the Communist enemy that is nonstrategic; that we should not sell our enemy anything, not a pencil or a pill, because I do not want to do anything to 97-627-68-pt. 2-4 PAGENO="0050" 482 strengthen their capacity to prolong the war and escalate our loss of life and treasure overseas. I think the basic flaw in the administration of the President-and the Senator, instead of us, should be supporting him, and I have supported him in Viet- nam-is that he relies too much on military strength, military effort, military weapons, and military sacrifices, and has not really begun to utilize our diplo- matic strength and our industrial strength and our great commerce. We propose that some should pay 20 percent, because these certain exporters have been trading with the Communists overseas. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. MUNDT. I will yield, if the Senator will associate himself with me when the majority leader consults us `about a time limitation and point out that he has prevented me from even getting started with my prepared presentation. Mr. MONDALE. In the article to which I earlier referred `about the Dresden meeting, Mr. Henry Kamm, reporting from Prague on March 26, states: "A. high member of the `Czechoslovak Government indicated in conversation that economic pressure had been put on Czechoslovakia to restrain `her internal liberalization and to hold the Soviet-bloc line in foreign policy." I emphasize "economic pressure." In other words, what happened in Dresden was that the Stalinist-type Com- munist leaders summoned Du'bc~k and the new leaders of the Communist Party, because they were terribly concerned about the liberalization going on in Czecho- slovakia. The article implies that the only thing available to `Moscow is economic pressure, and notes the particular economic dependence of Czechoslovakia on Soviet Russia. Does t'he proposal of the Senator from South Dakota weaken or strengthen the Soviet Union? I believe it serves to strengthen, by increasing that economic dependence and the corresponding ability of the Soviet Union to apply pressure. I believe the Senator's proposal is bad for our balance of payments. I think it is bad for the devel'opment of peaceful coexistence, free trade, and understanding between the E'a'st and the West. I believe it is t'he one means by which we can most strongly contribute to the economic hold which the Soviet Union wishes to continue to exercise over eastern `Europe. Further, it denies nothing to eastern Europe; it `simply gives De Gaulle and the other leader~s of western Europe the opportunity to supply what we would withhold. Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, I should like to answer that. Let us take Czechoslovakia, since tht country is t'he example the Senator has quoted. I, too, `have been in Czechoslovakia, though not recently-not within the last 8 months-so I bow to my friend from Minnesota as being much more expert than I am for that reason, andalsobecause `he reads the New York'Pirnes with much greater dedication than I. I remind the Senator, however, of the events of the last liberal uprising in Czechoslovakia when that great liberal, Jan Masaryk, was murdered by being thrown out the window. That is `how that one ended. So this time they are resort- ing to economic pressu're. Let us explo're that. Wn can say to the Czechs, "You need not trade much with Russia any more. We have a lot of wonderful merchandise over `here. You make some fine ~things we would like to have in our country. We can work it out, just as soon as you will agree not to ship weapons to Hanoi to continue to prolong the war," which is causing such agony in this cOuntry and which is actually the reason we are de- bating thi's'bill today. The proponents of the measure `are saying, "Let us tax everybody 10 percent higher." I say, "Let us shorten the war by curtailing the supplies which are pro- longing the war," and we run into a maze of technicalities. 1 believe it is just as plausible that we can help make this split more certain by saying to the Czechs, "You can count on us; you just quit shipping supplies to Hanoi," and thereby putting a little bit more pressure on Russia. Russia is having something of a hard time meeting her commitments now. She is trying to establish superiority in antiballistic missiles. We hear debates as to whether we now `have a missile lag with Russia or no't. She is developing a tremendous' new navy. She has :been able to arm North `Korea. The administration says that we could not h"ve protected the PuebTo when she came near the coast of North Korea. Why? Because of 75 Russian Migs just over the hill. Where did they come from? From Russia; from this great military economy they have built up in pa'rt because we and others have come to their PAGENO="0051" 483 aid, have taken care of their civilian needs, and have let them put all of their resources into the military. We have thereby permitted the arming of the Arab States, and they are on the verge of another war, simply because Russia and other Communist States have supplied arms to Nasser and his friends-the Senator knows it and I know it-and we made it easier for them to do it by satisfying the needs of the Russian civil- ian economy, so that they could take the men, the materiel, the planes and equip- ment that would normally be used for civilian needs and concentrate on making thmselves the great, big military merchant and supply source of the world. I want to stop that just a little bit. I want to do it so badly that I am willing to accept a technical difficulty or two in drafting the legislation. I think an ex- pression by the Senate on intent is the important thing. That is why I want a rolicall. Good gracious, if the majority of Senators feel as does the Senator from Minnesota, fine; that is what a roilcall is for. Let us reveal that. If they feel, however, as do I, that we ought to do something different after 5 years of fighting and no period of winning, then I think we have got to do something different, and it should not be to pull out, or pull back, under that enclave theory of General Gavin, which I think is as dead as the soldiers would be all around him if he were in charge, and were to do it. But let us not just sit here and twiddle our thumbs and say, "Let us send 50,000 more soldiers, and escalate our sales to Russia, so she can send enough men, guns, Migs, and weapons to kill the additional 50,000." When are we going to get off from this bloody treadmill, and try something different? Here, at least, is a sugge~tion: to curtail the source of supply and thus reduce the length and the cost of the war. Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. President, will the Senator yield for a question? Mr. MTJNDT. I promised to yield first to the S'enhtor from Minnesota. Mr. MONDALE. Just one moment. I, too, am grateful that we are to have a rollcall. It is quite clear that the philosophy undOrlining the Senator's proposal ha's been the dominating one in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. I think this philosophy is tragically wrong: it is misguided; it is helping the enemy; it is hurting our balance of payments; it is interfering with peaceful strategic trade; it is obliterating our attempts to understand each other more; and, tragically, it is preventing the best hope for these pathetic countries of Eastern Europe to be able to stand on their own feet and wrest themselves free from Soviet control. In the old days, the Khrushchev strategy in the Hungarian uprising was based on suppression by force. Those days are over. Mr. MTJNDT. Are you sure? Mr. `MONDALE. I am not sure. Mr. MUNDT. You do not take `the word of the New York Times for it, absolutely into permanency. You may be sorry if you do. Mr. MONDALE. I am not as close to Moscow as is the Senator from South Dakota. I think these days are over, but he may have better information than I. In any event, it is quite apparent, regardless of that, that the basic strategy of the Soviet Union today is to maintain economic dependence over Eastern Europe. The Soviet Union is terribly concerned by the dramatic shift of trade, on the part of Rumania, to Western markets. For `when countries become independent of the Soviet Union in trade, they almost inevitably show that they will become independent in political matters as well. I believe this policy should be debated. I think Congress is making a serious mistake. The countries of Western Europe are the main beneficiaries, because they are getting the markets. Eastern Europe is not being denied anything. I think if this amendment is agreed to, there will be joy in Moscow, and there will be joy in France; but there should be very little joy in Washington. Mr. MTJNDT. There will certainly be joy among the armed services in Viet- nam if we adopt it. The Senator can add that, too. It will not be limited to those places the Senator mentioned and, in my oipnion, will not be evident there, even if in fact the Senator's hypothesis is sound, and I have heard it for a long time-I sit on the Foreign Relations Committee and listen to it. In fact, I have spent more time listening to State Department speakers apologizing for their bad guesses about this particular policy than anything else they talk about, because they have made a lot of these conjectures, and always have an alibi ready when they do not work out. PAGENO="0052" 484 For example, there is the fact of the Russians' failing to sign the Consular Agreement. They have done nothing about it. If the... Senator's hypothesis ia sound they would have signed it a long time ago The State Department also guessed wrong and advised us badly on that one But apart from that if they are now going to try to put countries together and cement their Communist coalition by becoming the great provider econom- icelly for the rest of the world it would seem to me if that hypothesis were cor rect ~i e would not be helping it by our amendment We would not be making it easier for the Russian economy to plug up those loopholes so that they can pro- vide all those things They buy from us only the things they desperately need Mr MAGNU5ON Does the Senator intend to offer his list of items ~ Mr MUNDT Yes Obviously we will not now finish this debate tonight There are pages of exactly what they bought, the date they purchased it, and the pay- ment in terms of our dollars. I think the Senator is entitled to know that. 1 think our constituents are entitled to know that because we are going to say by our vote on this issue when it comes to a vote some time tomorrow All right let us encourage an expansion of that warfeeding trade or we are going to say Let as discourage it Certainly the pending amendment is not going to solve the problem I think that we can argue the economic matter either w'ty Only time can tell which one of us is correct as far as the economic philosophy is concerned But we have a war on our hands today Mr HOLLAND Mr President `a ill the Senator yield? Mr MUNDT I yield Mr HOLLAND I noticed during the discussion of the able Senator from South Dakota that he has several times used the words war materials and re ferred to the fact that the Communist countries are supplying war materials to North Vietnam Mr. MUNDP. Perhaps I should have said weapons of war, too. Mr HOLLAND I notice however in reading his amendment that he does not confine his amendment to the fuinishing by Communist countries of war mate rials or materials of war but the amendment says suppling material to the Government of North Vietnam Mr MUNDT The Senator is correct That is any material Mr HOLLAND We find the words on lines 7 and 8 of page 1 which is supply ing materials to the Government of North Vietnam Mr MUNDT The Senator is correct Mr HOLLAND We also find the same ~s ords on page 2 of the amendment which is the portion which covers the affidavit by the taxp'tyer The same words are used there. . . . .. .. Do I correctly understand that the Senator proposes then that the taxpayer in order to free himself from the tax if he deals with any. Communist country must be able to mal e `in affidavit that that country is not furnishing any type of material to North Vi~tnam ~ Mr MUNDT The Senator is correct it says material and as I say if one adopts my hypotheses-if one disagrees fine-it is clear people think that we can fight i'a ar with an enemy and give him everything but ammunition and win the `aar and send him clothing and fruits and vegetables and housing material and bathtubs I think that in this kind of `i war we are fighting an economic war along with a military war and we should deliberately do nothing at all to strengthen our enemy. . . . . .. . That is one of my big quarrels with President Johnson whose direction of the war is that he can continue to pile on the military strength and increase the casualties as if there were no economic way by u hich to put the pinch on H'inoi I think that there is I think we should start trying noi~ -with this amendment I w ant to bre'ik down their economy by stopping all exports from going there as much as we can and by putting on an economic pincher which I think `ae can do rapidly and w ith less cost in lives than by bombing them by simply putting pressure on their supply of war material That is why we provided that it cover materials of any kind Mr. HOLLAND. The Senator did not intend to cover the war materials or mate- rials of war or to use similar words but intended to cover materials of any kind exported from Communist countries to North Vietnam. . Mr MUNDT The Senator is correct Mr. HOLLAND. I thank . the Senator. That leaves the Senator from Florida In a very difficult position. . PAGENO="0053" 485 I have served on conference committees twice in the last 2 years in which amendments were pending that involved this general question. One had to do with the foreign aid appropriation One had to do w ith the last version of Public Law 480 In both cases the conferees were furnished with figures from the Department of Commerce which showed rather conclusively that the principal furnishers of materials other than war supplies to North Vietnam were Japan and Hong Kong. Mr. MUNDT. And England, France, West Germany, and many others. Mr. HOLLAND. If the thrust of the amendment is to prevent any material from reaching North Vietnam, I think the Senator should take notice of the fact that the principal suppliers of materials other than war materials to North Vietnam are not Communist countries. I wonder why the Senator has limited his amendment to Communist nations. Mr. MUNDT. That is a good question and I shall gladly answer it. Mr~ HOLLAND. If the thrust of the Senator's amendment is as broad as he has indicated, and if he is anxious to prevent any materials from reaching North Viet- nam, I think he, who incidentally was in one instance a conferee on one of the hills I have mentioned, should have knowledge of the fact and should recall that the figures furnished us by the Commerce Department showed very clearly that most of the materials reaching North Vietnam, other than war materials, came from two friendly countries, Hong Kong and Japan. Does the Senator recall that? Mr. MTJNDT. Of course I remember that. I will now answer the question the Senator was asking, and that was, if I understand it correctly, that he wanted to know why we did not spell out weapons of war and why we included all materials exported from Communist countries to North Vietnam. That is a very good ques- tion. The Senator from Virginia [Mr. Bmn] and I discussed that at some length. In the first place, when we start trying to spell out what are weapons of war and what are nonstrategic supplies, as the Senator from Florida knows as well as I, we at once hit a hopeless impasse unless one catalogs and inventories all of the items to be included or removed. Tn the second place, it is true that Japan, West Germany, the Scandinavian countries, England, to a great degree, and many of the other so-called friendly countries are shipping materials other than weapons of war to North Vietnam and are thereby in a sense shooting in the back their friend Uncle Sam who is defending their freedom, because they are making it more possible for Hanoi to continue and to escalate the war. Nevertheless, while they do that, we recognize that in the winning of this war, we must shut off first and foremost the shipment of missiles, guns, Migs, tanks, and ground-to-ground rockets, because we are fight- ing a country that cannot manufacture its own sophisticated weapons. If we would just decide that instead of sending boys `over there to `such a great extent we would keep these countries from shipping armaments, the war would be over soon. I am convinced that it would have `been over more than a year ago had we been able to `develop some kind of blockade. I know the arguments against bombing Haiphong and against blockading the harbor. However, had we been able to blockade the harbor, the war would have been over. This amendment provides a different, a `safer, but still an effective step in stopping those war `sup- plies from reaching North Vietnam. This is the first step in the direction of making it unlikely that the Communist countries will continue to supply that endless, growing chain of weapons to North Vietnam. That is why we said materials, as far as the Communist countries are concerned and did not take any action against any of the non-Communist coun- tries, `because none *of them are sending `any of the armaments or military weapons. Mr. HOLLAND. Frankly, I am surprised. I thought that probably the Senator had inadvertently omitted the word "military" before "materials," or had omitted some similar word. Mr. MUNDT. We did it deliberately. Mr. HOLLAND. However, since I find that the Senator is definitely trying to preclude trade between our country and any Communist country that is supply- ing any kind of material whatsoever to North Vietnam, and since the `Senator knows, as I know he knows, that the principal suppliers of meterials other than war materials to North Vietnam are not the Communist countries, but are instead Japan and Hong Kong- Mr. MUNDT. Just a moment. The Senator said that I know, and the Senator from Florida knows that I know, that the principal supplies of materials other than war materials to North Vietnam are Japan and Hong Kong. PAGENO="0054" 486 Mr. HOLLAND. The Senator was one of the conferees on one of the conference committees to which I referred; Mr. MTJNDT. However, when the Senator `says that I know and he knows that I know that the major suppliers of nonmilitary goods are Japan and Hong Kong, that depends upon how he defines those supplies. If the Senator is talking strictly about food supplies, nonmilitaristic supplies, and supplies that cannot be re- fabricated into military weapons, I concur. However, `if the Senator is com- mingling other items, I deny the accuracy of the statement. Mr. HOLLAND. Mr. President, the data furnished us by the Commerce Depart- ment shows very clearly that the principal suppliers Of material generally other than military supplies to Vietnam were Hong Kong and Japan. That covers cloth of all kinds, food and supplies of all kinds. That covers all kinds of knickknacks, household goods of every kind, and many other types of goods, as the Senator well remembers. Mr. HTJNDT. When the Senator limits it to that limited list then I concur. Mr. HOLLAND. I was frankly surprised that the Senator left out the word mili- tary, because that word was not left out in `the amendment which we had before us which dealt with the foreign aid bill and with the Public Law 480 authoriza- tion bill. This problem makes the amendment have a rather hollow ring, because it is aimed at cutting off supplies other than military supplies from only a limited source and which furnishes only a small part of those supplies other than military supplies. I am surprised that this was not an oversight, and I want to express the surprise in the `Record. Mr. MTJNDT. What particularly does the Senator find wrong with keeping the Communist countries from shipping these materials to our enemy? Mr. HOLLAND. I believe there is no difference between a `thimble or a `handker- chief or a shirt that comes from Hong Kong and one that might come from a Communist country, and I believe there is no difference between a can of food of some kind that comes from Hong Kong or Japan and one that comes from a Communist country. If the Senator `seriously is trying to cut off materials of all types, I am amazed that `he does not take note of the fact that the principal supp:liers of materials other `than ~var materials to North Vietnam are the friendly countries which I have mentioned, together with some others which he has mentioned, who supply lesser amounts-the Scandinavian countries and others. It makes the amendment have a much different meaning to me, and I have already said it makes the amendment have a rather hollow ring, if the Senator really meant to leave out the word "military" in connection with materials. Mr. MUNDT. A.s I `said before, the only reason the word "military" is left `out is to make certain that those who tend to make mountains out of molehiils in the field of technical, miscroscopic analyses cannot apply the same technique that we have had ventilated on the floor of the Senate today, and say, "How do you know that the Russians are sending them a military supply? This is not a gun. This is only the stock of a gun. T'he barrel i's in the other package. It is not put together." So if you are going to make it effective, you have to make it "material" when you are dealing with the great Communist `sources supplying the weapons for North Vietnam. The reason why we are not concerned about the material going in from Tokyo and such `places-although personally I am concerned, and I wish the free world would help us in a great, joint economic effort to end the war-why we are not trying to legislate against that now is that, happily, the free nations of the world are not the offenders in the areas where it hurts the most and where our boys are getting killed with imported armaments. Mig'.s are made in Russia; 8,000 Russian antiaircraft guns are shooting down nobody knows how many American boys, while we debate the issues and quibble over technicalities here on the Senate floor today. Every one of those guns was sent from Russia, and all the big tanks about which we read go in from Russia. Why should we not do some- thing realistic? We squander our time and worry about taxes and such things. We had better move along the paths which are available to us. We cannot correct all the cupidity and the desires of tradesmen in all the other countries to make easy profits from difficult wars but we can start reducing losses In life and treasure by approving this amei*lment now. We can do something about the people in America who sell these materials. All material's sold to those countries would be subject to the 20 percent war profiteering tax. PAGENO="0055" 487 [Excerpt from Congressional Record, Mar. 28, 1968] Mr. MTJNDT. Mr. President, I understand that the leader on the other side wants to make a statement now. I rise only to ask unanimous consent on behalf of the Senator from Virginia [Mr. Byrd] and myself that we be permitted to modify our amendment to read as follows: "On page 2 delete the language on lines 1 through 6 and insert the following: "`(B) The tax imposed by subsection (a) shall apply for any taxable year only to taxpayers who have been granted a license to export or who have filed an export declaration with customs at the port of shipment and who fail to file a statement with their tax return that they have not engaged during the taxable year in trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam'." The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the amendment is modified ac- cordingly. Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, I do that simply because in colloquy on yesterday, it was brought out that many taxpayers would have to check a blank in their income tax form as a disclaimer. In conference with people downtown this morn- ing, and those in charge of this kind of export business, so far as we could spell by the two statements and all the people involved, the rest of the taxpayers would not have to make that check. Thus, we obviate that extra difficulty for the tax- payers. Now, Mr. President, I am happy to yield to the Senator from Minnesota. The PRESIDING OFFICER. How much time does the Senator from Minnesota yield himself? Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, I yield myself 10 minutes. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Minnesota is recognized for 10 minutes. Mr. MONDALE. Mr. President, I rise to oppose the pending amendment offered by the Senator from South Dakota [Mr. MUNDT]. If this amendment were to be adopted, there would be celebrations in the Kremlin because w'e would be helping the Russians to hang on to their rebellious satellites. The pending amendment is intended to limit the Eastern Europeans' ability to assist North Vietnam wage war, by discouraging American trade with Eastern Europe. It would do nothing of the sort. There are many, many other sellers only too willing to step in and take our markets and supply the nonstrategic foodstuffs and goods we sell to Eastern Europe. This amendment would not prevent Eastern Europe from participating in world trade-those countries would only turn to other suppliers. Mr. President, what are we doing here? I think it is terribly important to understand the serious, subs:tantial, and fundamental character of the pending amendment. Many people compare it with past restrictions which have been imposed by Congress, in one way or another, on trade with Eastern Europe. Some of the restrictions have applied to extension of Export-Import Bank cred- its. Some of them have conditioned the extension of American aid, in one way or another, to seeking a reduction of help from Eastern Europe to the Communist side in North Vietnam. Those restrictions have had an effect-but a modest one- on East-West trade. This is entirely different. This is using a different tool, the tax tool, to raise what I regard to be an insuperable barrier to any kind of trade between an American taxpayer and Eastern Europe. It would eliminate somewhere between $200 million and $400 million in beneficial cash sales from this country to East- ern Europe. Thus, it would not have a modest effect. It would be a fundamental prohibition effectively limiting any trade of any kind. In the process, we would lose desperately needed exports. Even worse, we would throw these nations on the mercy of the Russian giant they are struggling to escape. The amendment would succeed only in giving business to our competitors. It would make the countries of Eastern Europe more dependent on the Soviet Union. It would completely frustrate the original purpose of the bill. American businessmen have cultivated the markets in Eastern Europe because these markets are growing, becoming more consumer-oriented. The customers are ready and willing to buy; the French or other Western Europeans will be de- lighted to have the business we throw away if this amendment becomes law'. PAGENO="0056" 488 Mr. President, the basis of the Mundt amendment is mistaken in fact-Amen- Lean business is not assisting the North Vietnamese. If we allow, ourselves to be blinded by such stories, we hurt only~ o'urselves-our balarice of~ payments; our peaceful strategic trade our attempts to understand and assist the nations of Eastern Europe in their attempt to break the monolithic position of the Corn- .munist bloc. ```` Mr President throughout Eastern Europe there are young able Communist leaders coming into' their own who desperately desire tO break loose from Soviet Union control If they are going to be free to do so they must first have a trade lifeline to the West This proposal if it were successful would be phying totally :and completely into the hands of Soviet strategy. But it will no,t be effective ex- cept to adversely affect our balance of payments arid adversely affect the econ- omy of this country, because it will simply shift this same trade to our competi- torsinWestern Europe and elsewhere. The proposal is at best a nullity, but it is far more than that. If it is adopted, as I said earlier, there will be great joy in Moscow arid great joy by De Gaulle and others who wish to detract from the strength and vitality of this country. This amendment is not like some of' the restrictions contained in the Export Control Act or in the Eximbank Act. This is a trade restriction act which would prevent all trade between us and Eastern Europe, and would be disastrous and a very dangerous thing for this country. Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, I shall be happy to yield 1 minute, or such' time beyond the 1 minute as he may desire, to the distinguished Senator from Ne- braska [Mr. HRUSKA]. Mr. HRTJSKA. Mr. President, I rise in support of the Byrd-Mundt amendment. It is my intention to vote for it when that time comes. On frequent occasions this Senator has discussed in some detail the matter of extending the benefits of U.S. actions, whatever they are, whether they are governmental, private, or a combination of the two, to Communist countries who `are actively engaged in actions which make possible the continuance by North Vietnam of sustained warfare in South Vietnam. Such benefits accrue when American firms sell and export to Communist coun- tries who are supplying material, arms, and munitions to North Vietnam and `to the `\Tietcong. It seems very much in order to express disagreement with the idea that it is `wise policy to engage in any program of building bridges to Communist countries. It is an expression of disagreement with the wisdom of entering into relation- ships with countries which are inconsistent with the direct efforts of such coun- tries to support resistance to and defeat of U.S. military and other efforts and programs in Vietnam. I wish to comment the Senator from South Dakota for having undertaken the `authorship and the sponsorship of this amendment, in association with the Sen- ator from Virginia. I repeat that it is my intention to support and to vote for the amendment. Mr. MUNDT. I thank the Senator from Nebraska. `The PRESIDING OFFICER. Who yields time? Mr. MUNDT. I yield myself 10 minutes. The PREsIDING OFFICER. The Senator from South Dakota. Mr. MUNDT. I thank the Senator from Nebraska for his very encouraging and ~helpful remarks, and for his customarily sound judgment in casting his vote against the encouragement of trading with the enemy in time of war. I ask unanimous consent-on my time, Mr. President-that the clerk at the ~lesk read section (a) as it appears in the amendment, because at the time Sen- ator BYRD and I offered the amendment and called it up for action, we modified the first paragraph, section (a). I have called this to the attention of the Senator from Minnesota, but for the information of all Senators, it should be realized that this bill deals with export products only. In fact, Mr. President, since the amendment is short, I ask unanimous consent that the clerk read the entire amendment, in its present form. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered. The legislative clerk read as follows: At the end of the amendment, insert the following new section: SEC. -. Special 20 percent surtax on taxpayers trading with certain Commu- nist countries. (a) In addition to any other tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, there is hereby imposed on every taxpayer who during the taxable year has engaged in export trade with any Communist country which is supplying mate- PAGENO="0057" 489 rial to the Government of North Vietnam, a tax equal to 20 percent of the taxable income of the taxpayer for the taxable year. (b) The tax imposed by subsection (a) shall apply for any taxable year only to taxpayers who have been granted a license to export or who have filed an ex- port declaration with customs `at the port of shipment and who fail to file. a statement with their tax return `that they have not engaged during the `taxable year in trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam. (c) Terms used in this section shall have the same meaning as when used in the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. (d) This special 2 percent tax shall cease to be applicable when the United States is no longer engaged in armed conflict with North Vietnam (whether or not there has been a declaration of war). Mr. MUNDT. I thank the clerk for reading the amendment in its full text. This, for all Senators, will clear up any ambiguities which they might have had in mind. It is unfortunate that some errors were included in the original printed text, but the amendment is now before the Senate in the precise form in which it was offered and intended by the authors, the Senator from Virginia [Mr. BYRD] and myself. I shall yield in a moment to the Senator from Virginia such time as he may desire, so that he may continue with the debate. I shall, later in the period al- lotted to me, respond to the statements just made by the distinguished Senator from Minnesota [Mr. MONDALE]. He has been called from the floor, as I am being called from the floor. I prefer, of course, to respond in his presence, if he has re- turned at the time I am able to obtain the floor again, but in any case, what he has said deserves analysis, consideration, and a reply. Before yielding to the Senator from Virginia, I wish to point out one factual item which became a center of some discussion in our various colloquies yesterday. I was asked several times yesterday if I would name the full list of Com- munist countries which are supplying weapons to our enemy in North Vietnam. I rather hesitated to do that from memory, because to name a partial list might exempt from consideration some other country which had not come to mind. Today, before the Senate convened, I took the time to consult with the In- ternal Trade Analysis Division of the Department of Commerce. I told them that some of my colleagues thought this was information which should be in the legislative history. I said I had taken a river shot at it, and given a saddle- back opinion yesterday as to four of them that I knew something about, but I would like to have the list in its entirety. So I received it. This is for the year 1966: Czechoslovakia, East Germany,. Hungary, Poland, Rumania, and the U.S.S.R. I was advised that in previous years, Albania and Bulgaria have also been engaged in shipping supplies to the enemy; and, in the case of Bulgaria, at least some arms were shipped in 1966, and the Division believes some are being shipped now, but they have not yet been able to assimilate the figures to make them available. So under the caveat of "let the seller beware," I suspect that this bill is going to apply to Americans exporting material of any kind to the following Com- munist countries supplying materials of all types, including weapons of war, to North Vietnam-I read the list again so that every Senator will have them in mind: Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Rumania, the U.S.S.R., Albania, and Bulgaria. I note with some gratification that, while Yugoslavia is a Communist coun- try, it is not engaged in the wicked business of shipping armaments to our enemy in Vietnam. So under that circumstance, unless it changes, there at least is one Communist country to which American traders can continue to export products without being subject to this :special penalty tax being `levied against those who make it more difficult for us to end the war, and make it more costly in terms of human life for those who fight the war. Our amend- ment is directed solely at that kind of export the Communist countries engaged in that kind of bloody business in supplying the weapons which, even now, are prolonging a war which should long ago have been over; because every military expert we have talked with, the knowledgeable people of the entire area, have said that without this steadily growing significant stream of arma- ments, guns, weapons, and petroleum from the Communist countries of East Europe, long ago the armies of Hanoi would have had to fold up, because you PAGENO="0058" 490 cannot operate a modern war without oil, and you cannot fight a modern war without planes and moving vehicles. You have to have tanks, and you have to have helicopters; and while it is true that some may argue that Red China and Red Russia both are supplying arms to Red Vietnam we must remember that the Red Chinese are caught up in a cultural revolution, which is to say they are having a bloody civil war in China, and they need their own guns, their own planes, and. their own tanks to maintain some semblance of order over there. So Russia and her East Euro- pean satellites have become virtually the sole source of supply of all important weapons now being used by Hanoi to continue its war activities. So we come face to face with the issue, as we vote on this matter in an hour or so: Do we want to take some legislative step, however small, to decrease the shipment of the weapons of war to North Vietnam which are responsible for the war continuing there, which everybody seems to want to stop-doves, hawks, and eagles? Some want to stop it by running out. Earlier today, the distin- guished deputy leader for the Democratic side made quite a speech as to why he did not think we should accept defeat and pull out. Some favor just holing up and rotting away in the unsavory climate of the Orient, subjecting our soldiers to the continual ravages of tropical diseases and staying there endlessly, not fighting, but ducking and dodging and dying until the forces of attrition force us out. Everybody wants to bring the conflict to an end. Those of us who believe we should bring it to an end successfully, as a prelude to an enduring peace, also want to bring it to an early end. We believe steps should have been taken through the diplomatic and economic processes years ago, but it is never too late to start trying. The first opportunity this body will have to start an effective approach, by diminishing the flow of arms to Communist countries assisting North Viet- nam, will be the roilcall vote on this amendment. Mr. President, I yield such time as he may desire to the distinguished Sen- tor from Viriginia. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Virginia is recognized. Mr. BYRD of Virginia. Mr. President, a parliamentary inquiry. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator will state it. Mr. BYRD of Virginia. Mr. President, how much time remains to the Senator from South Dakota? The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from South Dakota has 20 minutes remaining. Mr. MTJNDT. Mr. President, may we have a division of all the time between now and the time fixed to vote? It is a little complicated, I know, to divide time that way. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from South Dakota has 20 minutes re- maining. The other side has 30 minutes remaining. The Senator from Virginia is recognized. Mr. BYRD of Virginia. Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum. The PRESIDING OFFICER. Out of whose time? Mr. BYRD of Virginia. Out of our time. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Clerk will call the roil. The bill clerk proceeded to call the roll. Mr. BYRD of Virginia. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order for the quorum call be rescinded. The PRESIDING OFFHmR. Without objection, it is so ordered. Mr. SMATHER5. Mr. President, I yield 10 minutes to the distinguished Senator from Connecticut. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Connecticut is recognized for 10 minutes. Mr. DODD. Mr. President, I will try to be as brief as possible. I hope that the Senator from South Dakota will be present because I am extremely anxious that he hear what I have to say. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Connecticut is recognized for 10 minutes. . Mr. DODD. Mr. President, I asked for this time in order to clarify my position with respect to the amendment offered by the Senator from South Dakota. After reading over the Record and thinking the matter over again, I am not sure that I mode my position altogether clear. I was present as much as possible to hear the debate. PAGENO="0059" 491 The Senator from South Dakota enjoys a deserved reputation as a highly knowledgeable and effective opponent of communism. In most matters that have to do with our responses to communism and the cold war, I have found myself in agreement with him. Indeed, although we do have some important differences in the field of domestic policy, on foreign policy issues, unless my memory fails me, we have agreed about 98 percent of the time. I understand what moves the able Senator to submit this amendment. It is unquestionably true that Hanoi is receiving the bulk of its military supplies from the Soviet Union and the other Communist countries of Europe. Certainly, this has been the source of the radar-equipped antiaircraft systems that have thus far brought down 900 American planes over North Vietnam. It is also true that, while this has been going on, we have been moving to expand our trade with the Soviet Union and the Communist bloc, rather than to restrict it. And, in doing so, I fear that we have encouraged other Western nations to follow our example. I do not see how we can be very effective in asking others not to do what we are doing. Mr. M~JNDT. Mr. President, will the Senator yield? Mr. DODD. I yield. Mr. MUNDT. The Senator is quite right. And it is one of the things that troubles me. The Senator speaks correctly when he says that we have joined together in so many efforts to do something about winning the cold war when it was only a cold war. `One example of this was our cosponsorship of the Freedom Academy legislation. I am sure that the Senator is as desirous as is any other Senator of trying to do something about shortening this war without defeat and without failure. I have heard the Senator express himself rather eloquently before the Com- mittee on Foreign Relations. Mr. President, I yield. myself 2 minutes on my time. The PREsIDING OFFIcER. The Senator from South Dakota is recognized for 2 minutes. Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, I want to explain the reason why we came up with the pending amendment. I gave a speech in Brussels, Belgium, about last Thanksgiving Day at the NATO Parliamentarian Conference, in which I, as a Republican, was stating before that distinguished body of parliamentarians' from various countries- about 250 foreign parliamentarians being present from 15 countries--our Ameri- can position in the war and defending the decision of our Democratic President not to accept defeat in that conflict. I felt it was my patriotic duty to do so. I did my best. I pointed out that we could use at this time a little more friendliness from. the NATO countries, that we were not asking for money or materials of war or for manpower. I pointed out that we were just asking that they not shoot us in the `back by shipping supplies to Haiphong. My speech has twice -been inserted in the Congressional Record by colleagues of mine who approved of my presentation. I pointed out to them that tl1ere is not any victory that we could win over there that would not mean more to England, France, Belgium, and the other NATO countries than it would to us. and that there is not any defeat we face which would not mean more to them than to us. If they force us out, by surrender to defeat, we still have the bomb and our great system of defense. We could still defend ourselves for a while, even though it seems to me that in the end a greater cataclysmic holocaust might be expected. They accepted that statement. But they said: "How can we explain that to our chiefs of staff when your country is `encouraging your people to send sup- plies overseas and is also supplying the fighting men? We were not supplying men. Our boys are not being killed. And if you send men overseas and supply the materials to make the guns with which to kill your own boys, how can we convince our leaders that we should put a greater sanction on our exporters than you put on yours ?" It was a question to w-hich I could not provide a logical or a convincing answer. That is one reason that we are trying to w-rite a sort of sense-of-the-Senate measure with this tax amendment so that this kind of export business should be discouraged. That is about what we are trying to do. Mr. DODD. Mr. President, I thank the Senator. He makes sense, as he always does. I would like to explain, if I may, a little more specifically what I was talk- ing about. I think this policy has been mistaken, as I have said on more than one occa- PAGENO="0060" 492 sion, but I think that the amendment proposed by the Senator from South Dakota will not be effective in dealing with the situation about which he rightly complains; and I also feel that it would be a political mistake to take an omni- bus approach to all Communist countries, rather than differentiating between them. In my remarks yesterday, I said that, in the case of the Soviet Union, we should restrict or liberalize our trade policies, depending on their conduct in world affairs. That is not a new position for us. The Senator from South Dakota and I have long held that position. When we negotiated the big grain deal with the Soviet Union a few years age I said that I was opposed to selling them grain. If the people were hungry, I said let us give it to them. But in return let us ask that they stop their subver- sion around the world. I have taken the position that if they step up the cold war, as they are now doing in Vietnam and elsewhere, then we should cut back sharply. On the other hand, if they were to assist in terminating the Vietnam war on acceptable con- ditions, I would be in favor of letting them know in advance that we would be prepared to pay for this. * * Mr. MURPHY. Mr. President, will the Senator from South Dakota yield? Mr. MTJNDT. Mr. President, I yield 2 minutes to the Senator from California. The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from California is recognized for 2 minutes. Mr. Munpny. Mr. President, I rise for the purpose of congratulating my col- league from South Dakota [Mr. MUNDT] and join him in this effort, which I think is long overdue. We have listened for hours to the problems of the war in Vietnam. No one in this Chamber is for war. Everyone is against .the war. I know of no one who would not do anything he could to see that it is stopped as quickly as possible; provided, we can stop it with honor and with the achievement of freedom. The lives of those brave men which have already been lost in Southeast Asia should not have been sacrificed in vain. It would be unthinkable. Mr. President, I find it inconsistent and difficult to understand why some Americans would attempt to make a profit out of trading with the Communist bloc nations which are sending sophisticated weapons to North Vietnam. I congratulate my esteemed colleague for his attempt to stop such export trading with the enemy. I hope that the amendment will be adopted, and that this will be the beginning of a series of amendments, rules and regulations, which will finally make it impossible for anyone in America to give any help to those countries helping to perpetuate the enemy's war effort at the cost of American lives. Mr. MUNDT. I thank the Senator from California for his kind remarks. Mr. President, may I inquire of the Chair as to the state of the time? The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from South Dakota has ~ minutes remaining. The Senator from Florida has 12 minutes remaining. Mr. MUNDT. Mr. President, I promised the Senator from Minnesota [Mr. MONDALE] that I would make a rejoinder to his opposition to the pending amendment. He is not in the Chamber at the moment, but I wish to vindicate my promise to him. I rise once again in support of the amendment introduced by myself and my colleague from Virginia [Mr. BYRD]. I might add that I hope the Mundt-Byrcl partnership will be as successful this time. as we were when this same general subject area-trading with the enemy-was debated and voted upon with respect to Export-Import Bank bill. As I explained yesterday, this amendment would impose in addition to any other tax already imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, a tax equal to 20 percent of the taxable income of the taxpayer for the taxable year, if that tax- payer engaged in trade with any Communist country which is supplying material to the Government of North Vietnam. Mr. President, I have already mentioned the Rxport-Import Bank bilL What we did there, and what was submquently endorsed by the House of Representa- tives and Is now the law of the land, was to make it clear that no Government funds could be used in credit transactions to finance exports to countries who are engaged in armed conflict with the United States or any countries who are aiding such countries. In other words, the Government of the United States is not going to be guaranteeing any trade transactions with the same countries that are supplying their North Vietnamese allies with the means to prolong the war and kill more American boys. PAGENO="0061" 493 This was a significant victory, Mr. President, and the overwhelming vote in favor of concept of not trading with the enemy was, I believe, representative of the feeling in the country. Unfortunately, much of this trade continues because it does not involve Government financing and because, as incomprebensibe as it may sound, private transactions are condoned, even encouraged by the executive branch. As the Senator from Minnesota [Mr. MONDALE] pointed out yesterday, American tools are, in fact, a part of the Fiat factory, through other forms of fi- nancing. In other words, certain companies and foundations through their greed for additional profit have decided to do what the Government would not do. This is exactly the problem and I thank the Senator from Minnesota for pointing it out, We cannot prevent them from doing this, although I believe it has been illustrated time and time again that the vast majority of the American people oppose it, unless we place an embargo on all trade, but we can effectively discourage it by making the companies pay for their actions, and that is what this amendment does. This action by the executive branch and by certain companies, to me, and to many others, does not make sense. Why? First and foremost, because we take our differences with communism seriously, especially in Vietnam. Never before in history have we found it conscionable to trade with the enemy. Today we have more men committed to the defense of free South Vietnam than at any time during the Korean war and some say we will need many more before the strife is over. The ultimate sacrifice has been made by over 23,000 of our fellow citizens. A total in excess of 122,000 men have fallen casualty to Communist-supplied arms in the Vietnam war. It is little wonder to me that the Communist would question our resolve to carry this conflict to successful conclusion when we espouse a business-as-usual attitude in our trade policy. Worse, we find this administration assiduously promoting new markets within Communist nations at the very time these adver- saries openly brag of "fraternal" support to North Vietnam. What a contrast with our Korean war attitude. Then we drastically cut our exports to the Soviet Union back to zero. Similarily, during the Berlin crisis, trade was sharply re- strained, each application for export being postponed by the Department of Commerce with the explanation that it could not be considered in light of de- velopments arising over tensions in Berln. Since the executive branch is unwilling to close the floodgates on this scandal- ous trade, I believe Congress has the duty to act. Last year I introduced two bills, S. 2098, which would place an embargo on all such exports, and S. 2097, which doubled the customs duties on articles imported from these Communist coun- tries. I still hope these bills are enacted into law. In the meantime, however, we have another opportunity with this amendment to make that trade more difficult. What we have here today is an amendment that says if you, Mr. Taxpayer, or to be more realistic, Mr. Corporation, want to continue to trade with the Com- munist countries that are supplying the material necessary for the war in Vietnam to continue, you are going to have to pay for it. If your desire for profits trans- cends your desire for peace, we are going to make you take another look at your profit-and-loss statement. This amendment adds 20 percent more on his tax bill. It is a costly penalty- I do not deny that-but Vietnam is no picnic. Neither should it be a bonanza for American war profiteers. Do you not think those boys in service over there would not be willing to pay 20 percent more on their income tax if they could bring the war to an honorable conclusion and come home? You just bet they would. Mr. President, some may say that this trade is not substantial nor does it have any impact on the war.. They have not looked very closely at that trade. They are just too busy looking at their profit reports. Let me give you some examples. Some of these figures I gave you yesterday but I believe they need repeating. Last year alone, using the time period of January 1, 1967, to December 31, 1967, firms in our country shipped computer parts and related gear to the Soviet Union and other East European Communist bloc countries worth $3,186,707. Are computers valuable to the Soviets in supplying the North Vietnamese? Yesterday, the Senator from Minnesota spoke of "nonstrategic computers." If nothing else is clear as a result of former Secretary of Defense McNamara's 73~ years in the Pentagon, the fact that we are now in a period of computerized warfare is. The logistics of supplying a nation thousands of miles away with what they need, how best to get it there, the requirements of a specific unit to counterbalance U.S. strength in a given area-these are figures you do not come PAGENO="0062" 494 up with by using a Ouija Board. They have made computers actual armaments of war. Let us take another example for the same time period. U.S. firms have sup- plied $482,273 worth of oil production and drilling equipment. What do they think the North Vietnam tanks, airplanes, and other military vehicles are running on these days? They can move only because Russia and her Communist satellites are supplying Hanoi with every gallon of petroleum used In the war. How about items connected with aluminum production? Statistics from the Commerce Department show we traded to the Soviet Union alone last year $4,695,600, worth of these items. That is a lot of money, and aluminum is a mighty important substance in manufacturing airplanes. Mr. President, some of these items have to be specifically cleared for export by the executive branch, and unfortunaitely, they are so cleared more than 98 per- cent of the time. There is a substantial additional amount of trade, however, in items that do not even need a clearance. On October 12, 1966, the President authorized removal of over 400 items from the strategic control list. Now our exporters can trade in these items with no restrictions applied at all. And what are they? I will list a few. Diamond drill bits to help the Soviets drill for oil. As I pointed out last summer, this Is important because Russian oil drills are good only for shallow wells and they need the American kind to get down deep. We have `also opened the floodgates on various forms of scrap metal. Among these are iron ore mass, aluminum alloy waste and scrap, and other magnesium or magnesium alloy waste and scrap. Does that not bring back memories of Pearl Harbor to many of you with even reasonably long memories. Also included on this list cleared for trading by President Johnson's Executive action of 1966 was rifle cleaning compounds. If you do not believe it you can look it up on the list. It is export control commodity No. 55430. I placed the whole list of the items which were decontrolled by Presidential `action in the RECORD for March 18, 1967. You will find it there starting on page S2974. We also cleared bandages and surgical dressings, rubber thread and cord, automobile lifts and jacks for automotive vehIcles or aircraft by that Presidential action. We also allow them to ship the Communists shock absorbers, battery sepa- rators and other battery parts made of rubber, and spark plugs for aircraft and automobiles. Mr. President, this covers the first part of our "Tinkers-to-Evers-to-Chance" double play in the deadly conduct of war. Now what about the trade from these Communist nations to North Vietnam? I have already listed the countries. The question was asked yesterday, "What do they supply?" Rumania in particular was the object of the question. The answer is, among other things, oil. Is Hungary involved? Let them supply the answer themselves. Do not take my word for it. I shall come back to that in a moment. Mr. President, I could go on and on, but I think I have made my point that this trade is substantial and that it is related to the war effort. So we are back to the question of whether or not this trade s'hould be considered in the same category as all `other trade. I do not believe it should be. I believe that if these rich exporters and corporations want to continue with this trade, they should pay for it. Let them pay an extra 20 percent on all their profits. If they do not want to pay the penalty tax, they can quit trading with our enemies and submit to the Treasury Department a statement, under oath, that they have not been engaged during the taxable year in trade with any Com- munist country which is supplying materiel to the Government of North Vietnam. Mr. President, I invite special attention to a statement in a radio broadcast from Budapest on May 25, 1967, to which I referred a moment ago. I want to quote it, because so much serious thought has been devoted to this very tricky prohlem by the Senator from Connecticut, the Senator from Florida, and others, as to whether this effort to curtail the shipment of arms is important enough to justify our amendment, or whether because of some technicality in draftman- ship we should avoid recording our judgment on this basic issue. So, let us take it from the other side, if any Senator feels this issue is not important. The statement reads as follows: "(Budapest MTI International Service, in English, 9 :45 am. GMT, May 25, * 1967:) In a radio broadcast referring to the visit of Hungarian Defense Minister Lajos Czinege, `The importance of this visit was enhanced by the fact that the PAGENO="0063" 495 weapons protecting Hanoi on that front had been designed by Hungarian en- gineers and manufactured by Hungarian workers.'" Let me point out here that we have American exporters sending ingredients from the United States to Hungary right now so `that these Hungarian guns could be more abundantly manufactured. Continuing: "It was mentioned that the unit using the Hungarian guns was credited with shooting down the 1,000th U.S. plane destroyed over Vietnam and the same unit using the Hungarian guns shot down 10 other U.S. planes bombing Hanoi on May 19." The President, as the Senator from California puts it, with the realism for which he is noted and his capacity to see through the fog, are we really going to vote now `to encourage or discourage this kind of mercenary madness? Or, are we going to do something to stop it and move in the direction of cur- tailing it or do we vote to express our approval of it? This is not the final answer but it is a constructive start. In his position paper, the Senator from Minnesota stated that there would be celebrations in the Kremlin if the pending amendment should be adopted. I can assure the Senate that there will be far greater celebrations somewhere else if the amendment is adopted. Who will be celebrating the most when we adopt `this amendment? It will be our servicemen in Vietnam who are now being shot at by the guns the Communists are supplying. You could listen to the celebrations in Khe Sanh and Saigon. You would be able to listen to the rejoicing, the thanks, the gratitute, and the pious prayers of ap- preciation which will emanate from every battle encampment in every village, city, and field in which the American Army is located in South Vietnam, be- cause these men are the targets of the end result of this unprecedented American policy of trading with the enemy which, understandably, has never before pre- vailed in American history in any other war. That is where the celebrations will take place, Mr. President, and not in the Kremlin. Another statement we hear so often is that it would hurt our balance of pay- ments. Exactly and precisely. About $50 or $70 million in the balance of payments is coming our way in trading with the Communists. But I want Senators to know that that is not a balance of payments being paid in Russian gold. That is a balance of payments being paid in American blood, by our boys who are being shot, maimed, and killed in increasing numbers while the administration cries, "Give us more men to go to Vietnam." The administration states to chambers of commerce, labor unions, and to others, "Ship more goods to the Communist countries who are supplying the guns which kill our men and we will provide more men to take their places." Mr. President, how any rational person believes that he can sell the world that we are serious about this war, with that kind of self-defeating, indefensible, inconsistent policy, I simply cannot comprehend. How do we ever expect to convince the Communists that we are seriously in- terested in winning the war? How can we explain to the enemy in Hanoi, or to the mothers and fathers of our boys already in Vietnam, and those who are about to be drafted, that we really should get on with finishing the war but we would like to make a few fast bucks on `the side which will not even be subject to an extra war profiteering tax? Accordingly, I am not worried about that balance-of-payments argument, be- cause it is being paid for in American blood. To that kind of repayment I do not subscribe. [Excerpt from Congressional Record, Feb. 21, 1968) Mr. MIJSKIE. Mr. President, I submit a report of the committee of confer- ence on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on tl1e amendment of the House to the bill (5. 1155) to amend the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as amended, to sth~orten the name of the Bank, to extend for 5 years the period within which the Bank is authorized to exercise its functions, to increase the Bank's leading authority and its authority to issue, against fractional reserves, export credit insurance and guarantees, and for other purposes. I ask unanimous con'sent for the present consideration of the report. The PRESIDING OFFICER. The report will be read for the information of the Senate. PAGENO="0064" 496 The legislative clerk read the report, as follows :. "The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendment of the House to the bill (S. 1155) to amend the Export-import Bank Act of 1945, as amended, to change the name of the Bank, to extend for five years the period within which the Bank is authorized to exercise its functions, to increase the Bank's lending authority and its authority to issue, against fractional reserves, export credit insurance and guarantees, to restrict the fi- nancing by the Bank of certain transactions, and for other purposes, having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do recom- mend to their respective Houses as follows: "That the Senate recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the House and agree to the same with an amendment as follows: In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the House amendment insert the following: "`SECTION 1. The Export-Import Bank Act of 1945 is amended- "(a) By changing "Export-Import Bank of Washington," wherever that name* refers to the legal entity created by the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, to "Ex- port-Import Bank of the United States". "`(b) Section 2 of such Act is amended by striking subsection (b) thereof and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: ``"(b) (1) It is the policy of the Congress that the Bank in the exercise of its functions should supplement and encourage and, not compete with private capital; that loans, so far as possible consistently with carrying out the purposes of subsection (a), shall generally be for specific purposes, and, in the judgment of the Board of Directors, offer reasonable assurance of.. repayment; and that in authorizing such loans the Board of Directors should take into account the possible adverse effects upon the United States economy." "`(c) Section 2(b) of such Act is further amended by adding the following atthe end thereof: "`"(2) The Bank in the exercise of its functions shall not guarantee, insure, or extend credit, or participate in any extension' of credit "`"(A) in connection with the purchase or lease of any product by a Communist country (as defined in section 620(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended), or agency or national thereof, or "`"(B) in connection with the purchase or lease of any product by any other foreign country, or agency, or national thereof, if the product to be purchased or leased by such other country, agency, or national is, to the knowledge of the Bank, principally for use in, or sale or lease to, .a Com- munist country (as so defined) except that the prohibitions contained in this paragraph shall not apply in the ease of any transaction which the President determines would be in the na- tional interest if be reports that determination to the Senate and House of Rep. resentatives within thirty days after making the same. "`"(3) The Bank shall not guarantee, insure, or extend credit, or participate in the extension of credit in connection with the purchase of any product, tech- nical data, or other information by a national or agency of any nation. "`"(A) which engages in armed conflict, d~eclared or otherwise, with armed forces of the United States; or "`"(B) whic~h furnishes by direct governmental action (not including chartering, licensing, or sales by non-wholly-owned business enterprises) goods, supplies, military assistance, or adviser to a nation, described in sub- paragraph (A); nor shall the Bank guarantee, insure, or extend credit, or participate in the ex- tension of credit in connection with the purchase by any nation (or national or agency thereof) of any product, technical duta, or other information which is to be used principally by or in a nation described in subparagraph (A) or (B). "`"(4) The Bank shall not guarantee, insure, or extend credit, or participate in an extension of credit in connection with any credit sale of defense articles and defense services to any country designated under section 4916 of the Inter- nal Revenue Code of 1954 as an economically less developed country, for pur- poses of the tax imposed by section 4911 of that Code. The prohibitions set forth in this paragraph shall not apply with respect to any transaction the consumina- tion of which the President determines would be in the national interest and reports such determination (within thirty days after making the same) to the Senate and House of Representatives. In making any such determination the President shall take into account among other considerations, the national in- terest in avoiding arms races among countries not directly menaced by the Soviet PAGENO="0065" 497 Union or by Communist China; in avoiding arming military dictators who are denying social progress to their own people; and in avoiding expenditures by developing countries of scarce foreign exchange needed for peaceful economic progress. "`"(5) In no event shall the Bank have outstanding at any time in excess of 7½ per centum of the limitation imposed by section 7 of this Act for such guarantees, insurance, credits or participation in credits with respect to exports of defense articles and services to countries which, in the judgment of the Board of Directors of the Bank, are less developed." ``(c) By changing in section 2(c) of that Act, "$2,000,000,000 to read $3,500,000,000". "`(d) By changing the last sentence in section 3(d) of that Act to read: "Members, not otherwise in the regular full-time employ of the United States, may be compensated at rates not exceeding the per diem equivalent of the rate for grade 18 of the General Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5332) for each day spent in travel or attendance at meetings of the Committee, and while so serving away from their homes or regular places of business, they may be allowed travel expenses, includ- ing per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by section 5703 of title 5, United States Code, for individuals in the Government service employed inter- mittently." "`(e) By changing, in section 7 of that Act, "$9,000,000,000" to read "$13,500,000,000." ``(f) By changing, in section 8 of that Act, "June 30, 1968" to read "June 30, 1973".' "And the House agree to the same. "EDMUND S. MUSKIE, "JOHN SPARKMAN, "HARRISoN WrLLIAMS, "JOHN TOWER, "BOURKE B. HICKENLOOPER, "Managers on the Part of the senate. "WRIGHT PAPMAN, "WM. A. BARRETT, "LE0N0R K. SULLIVAN, "HENRY S. REUSS, "THOMAS L. ASHLEY, "WILLIAM S. MOORHEAD, "WILLIAM B. WIDNALL, "PAUL A. FINO, "FLORENCE P. DWYER, "Managers on the Part of the House." The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection to the present consideration of the report? There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the report. Mr. MTJSKIE. Mr. President, 5. 1155 was passed by the Senate on August 11, 1967. On February 7 the House passed H.R. 6649, the companion bill to S. 1155, and then moved to strike all after the enacting clause in the Senate bill and substitute the House language. Almost a year ago, identical companion bills were introduced in the House and Senate. The provisions of the bills as introduced were passed by both bodies virtually intact. It is in the restrictive amendments added by the Senate and the House that we find the relatively minor differences between the two versions of 5. 1155 which the conference report now reconciles. It does so by accepting the House version of limitations on Eximbank support of arms sales to develop- ing countries and support of exports to countries whose governments furnish goods or supplies to our adversaries, and by accepting the Senate amendments on exports to Communist countries and on the possible effect of Eximbank loans on the domestic economy and our balance of payments. Both bills extend the life of the Bank by 5 years to June 30, 1973; increase its lending authority by $4.5 billion, to a total of $13.5 billion; raise by $1.5 billion, to a total of $3.5 billion, the ceiling on guarantees and insurance which can be done on a 25 percent fractional reserve basis; permit the Bank to compensate its Advisory Committee members at a higher rate; and change the name of the Bank to Export-Import Bank of the United States. These are the provisions which were contained in the bills as originally introduced. 9T-621--GS-----pt. 2-----5 PAGENO="0066" 498 You will recall that the Senate added amendments which-in the order they appear in the bill-require Eximbank to consider possible effects of its loans on the domestic economy and the balance of payments; restrict the Bank's support of U.S. exports to Communist countries; limit the Bank's financing of arms sales to developing countries; prohibit support of exports to countries with which the United States is engaged in armed conflict or to other countries whose governments furnish goods or supplies to our adversaries; and prohibit Eximbank support of exports for use in a Soviet automobile plant. The House bill contained only two amendments, one relating to arms sales, which is substantially similar to the Senate provision, and one relating to exports to or for use in countries with which we are engaged in conflict or countries supplying them, which is also substantially similar to the comparable Senate amendment. However, the latter House amendment is comprehensive enough in its language and practical application to preclude Eximbank financing of exports for a Soviet automobile factory. With respect to `arms sales, section (3) of the Senate version of the bill states as the policy of the Congress that the Bank shall not assist in financing, under a Department of Defense guarantee, credit sales of defense articles and services by the Government or by U.S. exporters, except when the President de- termines such participation would be in the national security interest and re- ports such determination to both the Senate and House within 30 days. The comparable House provision states that the Bank shall not participate in any credit sale of defense articles or services to any country designated as economi- cally less developed for purposes of the interest equalization tax, except when the President determines such participation would be in the national interest and, as in the Senate version, so reports to the Congress within 30 days. The House provision, however, further requires that in making any such determination the President must take into account, "among other considerations, the national in- terest in avoiding arms races among countries not directly menaced by the Soviet Union or Communist China; in avoiding arming military dictators who are denying social progress to their own peoples; and in avoiding expenditures by developing countries of scarce foreign exchange needed for peaceful economic progress." Both the Senate and House versions of the arms credit limitation place a ceil- ing, equal to 7% percent of the Bank's total lending authority, on `the amount of financing which may be outstanding at any one time in connection with such credit sale of arms. The House version of this amendment, adopted by the conference, thus covers the same ground as the Senate version, but is somewhat stronger in that it adds additional criteria which must be taken into account before the transaction can be consummated. The Senate provision on arms sales, passed in August, would have to be re- vised in any event, since it refers to arms credits which are "guaranteed under section 503(e) and section 509(b)" of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. When Congress subsequently passed the Foreign Assistance Act of 1967 last November, those sections were not only renumbered but the Defense Department's guaranty authority itself was terminated effective June 30, 1968. Turning to the amendments relating to Communist countries or countries trad- ing with our enemies, you will recall that it is the Byrd amendment which pro- hibits Eximbank support of the export of any product to first, any nation with which the United States is engaged in armed conflict; or, second, any nation the government of which is furnishing goods or supplies to a nation with which we are engaged in armed conflict. It is the Mundt amendment which expressly pro- hibits the Bank from assisting exports to or for use in the construction of an auto- mobile plant in the Soviet Union-which of course means the proposed Fiat loan. On the House side, the Fine amendment prohibits the Bank from supporting the export of "any product, technical data, or other information" to or for use in first, any nation with which we are engaged in armed conflict, or second, any nation which furnishes by direct governmental action (not including chartering, licensing, or sales by nonwholly-owned business enterprises) goods, supplies, military assistance or advisers" to any nation with which we are engaged in armed conflict. Since `this version applies to exports which are "to be used prin- cipally by or in" the proscribed recipient countries, it covers the Fiat case. The House amendment thus in effect incorporates the provisions of both the Byrd and the Mundt amendments in the Senate bill. It also clarifies the kinds of government involvement in the furnishing of goods or assistance to our ad- versaries which are intended to be covered by the amendment. Members will recall that this was an area of some concern during debate on the Byrd amendment last year. As I have said, the House version clearly covers such transactions as the PAGENO="0067" 499 Fiat case but in my opinion would not include, for example, countries in which the governmental involvement is limited to such matters as the issuance of export licenses, sales by business enterprises not wholly owned by the government, or the use of privately owned vessels registered under its laws to transport non- government cargoes. The restriction would cease to have effect after hostilities cease, or after a particular government stops sending goods or assistance to our adversaries. The conferees have adopted the House version of this restriction. Section (c) of the Senate bill prohibits the Bank from supporting U.S. exports to or for use in any Communist country, except when the President determines such support to be in the national interest and reports such determination to Congress within 30 days. Although there was no identical provision in the House version, the Fino amendment outlined above c1e~rly prohibits Eximbank support of exports to or for use in all Communist countries, except Yugoslavia, for the duration of the Vietnamese conflict or, in the case of individual Communist countries, until the government stops supplying North Vietnam. Nevertheless the conferees have written into the conference bill section (c) from the Senate bill. We did so because we believe that after the termination of hostilities, when the Fino restriction would cease to be operative, the extension of Eximbank support of exports to Communist countries should be subject to a Presidential policy decision. This amendment, of course, is patterned after a similar limita- tion which has been included annually for the past 5 years in the Export-Import Bank portion of the Foreign Assistance and Related Agencies Appropriation Act. There is only one other difference between the Senate and House versions of S. 1155, and that is that the House version contains no provision comparable to the so-called Holland amendment in the Senate bill. This provision expresses as the policy of the Congress that in making loans the Bank's "Board of Directors should take into account the possible adverse effects upon the U.S. economy and the desirability of safeguarding the international balance-of-payments position of the United States." The conferees have included an amendment which provides that in making loans the Bank's "Board of Directors should take into account the possible adverse effects upon the U.S. economy." The Senate conferees did not insist upon the reference to the international balance-of-payments position in view of the assur- ances received in a letter dated February 16 from Mr. Harold F. Linder to the chairman of the committee, the Senator from Alabama [Mr. Sparkman]. I ask unanimous consent that a copy of the letter be printed in the Record. There being no objection, the letter was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows: EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF WASHINGTON, Washington, D.C., February 16, 1968. Hon. JOHN SPARKMAN, Chairman, Committee on Banking and Currency, U.s. senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: You will recall that last August when the Senate passed S. 1155, an act to amend the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as amended, it adopted an amendment which states as the policy of the Congress that in author- izing loans Eximbank's "Board of Directors should take into account the pos- sible adverse effects upon the United States economy and the desirability of safeguarding the international balance of payments position of the United States". No comparable provision was adopted by the House in its consideration last week of the companion bill to S. 1155. I understand that in the interest of expediting final enactment of the bill you may propose that the Senate adopt the House-passed version of S. 1155, which would result in the omission of this amendment from the bill as finally passed. I wish to assure you on behalf of the Board of directors of the Bank that if this should happen the Board would nevertheless adhere to the policy expressed in this amendment. Sincerely yours, HAROLD F. LINDEB. Mr. MusHlim. Mr. President, the provisions of S. 1155 as recommended by the committee of conference include the substance of all of the provisions contained in the legislation as it passed both the Senate and the House. The provisions in the conference bill clarify the language and intent of the restrictions adopted by the Senate and otherwise strengthen the bill. For these reasons, I move that the Senate adopt the conference report on S. 1155. PAGENO="0068" 500 "THE NEw WORLD," AN ADDRESS B~ SENATOR CHARLES H. PERCY TO THE MICHIGAN STATE REPUBLICAN CONVENTION, DETROIT, MICH., FEBRUARY 25, 1967 My friends, I accepted Governor Romney's invitation to speak here this after- noon because I owe him a debt of gratitude. There can be little question that the outstanding records he and other Republican governors have compiled in the 1960's played a significant part in the widespread Republican victories of last November. Clearly it was an autumn of discontent for many American voters. But they would not have turned to us in such numbers were it not for the fact that men like George Romney have given our party such a good name in recent years. Economic growth; restoration of fiscal integrity; dramatic progress in such areas as civil rights, mental health, education and conservation-these things have been achieved under your governor in Michigan and other Republicans elsewhere. They have not escaped the attention of the American voter. So I owe a large debt of thanks to Governor Ro~nney, as well as to all of you in the Michigan Republican Party who have backed him up so well. Led by people of the calibre of the Governor and Senator Griffin, my able and highly regarded colleague, you have built a party here which is a credit not only to Michigan, but to Republicans everywhere. I would like to talk to you today about a new world of political change emerg- ing all around us-a world which ultimately may allow us to more fully devote ourselves to the kind of sensitive and sensible government Republicans have envisk~ned. As long as we are spending 73 billion dollars on the military in a single year, critical domestic needs will go unmet. As long as we have a federal deficit of 9.7 billion dollars, soundly conceived programs such as federal tax rebates to the states will be difficult to enact. We in America like to tell ourselves that we are a peace-loving people. But if our quest for peace is to be taken seriously-if it is to be something more than slogans and charades-then we must grasp every legitimate opportunity to nur- ture peace. If we ignore such opportunities when they present themselves, in time the world will come to ignore our protestations of peaceful intention. In the months just ahead, several such opportunities will come before the American people and their Congress. Without risking the nation's security, we can take more practical steps toward harmonious East-West relations this year than perhaps at any other time since the Cold War began. It is my hope that the Republican Party will lead, not lag, in this gradual movement toward detente. It is my conviction that the Republican Party must lead in a rational discussion of a flexible, creative foreign policy, leaving the cant and chauvinism to others. Let us for once dispense with both the shrill cries of self-righteous nationalism and the wishful dreams of peace at almost any price, and objectively develop new policies which might lead to an easing of tensions among nations. If a policy would actually threaten our national security, then let us reject it. But if it would advance the prospects for peace in even a small way, while threatening nothing more than some stale cliches about American foreign policy and the Communist world, then let us adopt it. President Eisenhower was among the first to recognize the necessity of improv- ing communications with Communist regimes. He negotiated an end to the Korean War, started cultural and technical exchanges with the Soviet Union, sent Vice President Nixon to Moscow and invited Chairman Khrushchev to the United States. TRADE IN NON5TRATEGIO GOODS GRADUALLY INCREASED Many denounced President Eisenhower, and President Kennedy after him, for these policies. They said it wasn't possible to do business with the Russians. They said even limited accommodation with the Soviet Union was naive and possibly suicidal. Some spoke darkly of softness on Communism. But despite intermittent crises, communications between the great powers im- proved, and gradually the mutual fear which had characterized the previous decade abated. By 1963, it was possible to conclude a nuclear test-ban treaty, which has been honored by both the Soviet Union and the United States. Now new opportunities for civilized contact between East and West are near- ing. A Consular Convention with the USSR is before the United States Senate. A treaty banning nuclear weapons from outer space has been signed and awaits PAGENO="0069" 501 ratification. A treaty to stop nuclear proliferation is being negotiated. Legisla- tion opening the way to increased East-West trade may soon come before Con- gress. If we invoke the fears of the past to block these initial steps, then I think our children will find little security in the future. And if we close the door now, who can say when opportunity will knock again? Our most immediate opening for concilia:tion lies in the U.S-Soviet Consular Convention. It was Vice President Nixon who, in 1959, first suggested that the cause of peace would be well served if an American consulate were opened in the Soviet Union and a Soviet consulate in the United States. The late Cl1ristian Herter, then Secretary of State, proposed later that year the opening of negotia- tions for a consular convention. In 1904, the convention was signed by both sides, and today it needs only Senate approval to take effect. I strongly support Senate ratification of this agreement, and I urge your support Of it as well. We need widespread public support of this treaty, for public oppoSition is skill- fully organized. My mail, and that of many other Senators, is running 200 to one against ratification. I do not believe this is an accurate reflection of American sentiment on the issue, but unless supporters of the treaty make their views known, the determined opposition could make ratification difficult. I believe this opposition is based on faulty premises which veil the real value inherent in the Consular Convention. It is argued, for instance, that the personnel in a Soviet consulate would pose a serious security risk to the United States. Since more than 1000 Russians are already officially employed here, it is hard to believe that another dozen will significantly endanger the Republic. J. Edgar Hoover has satisfied the President of the United States that ratification of the treaty would impose no insurmountable security problem. Acting Attorney Gen- eral Clark has assured me in a recent letter that additional F.B.I. costs which might be incurred by a Soviet consulate would be very small, and "would represent only a minute fraction of existing F.B.I. appropriations." It is argued that any cooperation with the Soviet Union while the Soviets help arm the North Vietnamese is a betrayal of American soldiers in Vietnam. I cannot agree. I think we owe it to the men who must fight our wars to pro- mote peace and peaceful contact in every way we can. What better time to narrow the differences between adversaries than in time of war? And that, really, is what the Consular Treaty is all about-it will help narrow the gulf between peoples and nations. It will not usher in a Golden Age of Har- mony between America and the Soviet Union. It will not cause men to instantly lay dawn their arms and beat their swords into plowshares. Nothing would be more unwise than to tempt renewed aggression by unilaterally weakening our defenses, but the Consular Treaty has no bearing on our defenses. The treaty will move us toward more agreeable East-West relations and away from the fearful tensions of recents years. Ratification of the Consular Conven- tion is an important symbol of America's readiness to join a world already in the process of readjustment. If we wish to keep pace with history, I do not see how we can fail to take this small step. How, in fact, can we fail to take other, larger steps toward readjustment and reconciliation? Our choices are basic ones: we move ahead with the times, or we remain frozen in Cold War attitudes that the rest of the world is swiftly discarding; we continue to isolate the people of Eastern Europe or we take steps that will keep them in touch with Western ideas and institutions; we progress, or we stand still. The recent decision of the Italian automobile firm FIAT, to build a plant in the Soviet Union says much about progress in other nations. Some in this country will denounce the Italians for consorting with the enemy. Some will call for reprisals. I think they will be taking a limited view of a promising development. I see the new FIAT plant in Russia as symbolic of a new era in East-West trade. I welcome the increased Soviet concentration on consumer production, and especially automobile production. You in Detroit know so well the impact automobile production has on a nation's economy. In the Soviet Union, automobiles could soon beget new invest- ments in highways instead of runways, in gas stations instead of fueling bases, in motels instead of barracks. Today, the USSR has only a toehold in the automotive age. We-I should say you-produced 8% million cars in 1906. Soviet production was 230,000. In PAGENO="0070" 502 Moscow, there are exactly eight service stations, and less than 1800 in the entire Soviet Union. In the United States, there are well over 200,000. As Soviet automobile production increases, I believe it will result in greater internal pressure on the Soviet government to gear its economy to its own do- rnestice needs rather than to war. We should not forget that we are engaged in competition between ideologies, but how much better it would be if the con- test were to take place on an economic battlefield where we have preeminent strength and are the envy of the world. Surely this is preferable to the night- mare of a military competition which no one can win. If increased East-West trade is to become a reality, if we are to ratify the Consular Convention and the agreements which will follow it, then the United States must be prepared to adjust much of its foreign policy and its thinking. For we are dealing here with more than mere bridge-building between East and West; potentially, we are dealing with the beginning of the end of the Cold War. This will require not on'ly good faith on the other side, but willingness and innovation on our own. It will require a willingness to put away comfortable old ideas and adopt unfamiliar new ones. We cannot afford the extravagance of simplistic dog- matism. We cannot wage holy wars of anti-communism. If we remain inflexibly addicted to a world view which is no longer relevant, we shall soon loose any semblance of Free World leadership. Let us deal with the real world, not with a world of make-believe in which all Communists are equally villainous and America is presumed to be 9944/100 per cent pure. Twenty years ago, an outstanding Michigan Republican, Senator Arthur Van- denberg, recognizing a changing world, broke with the past and led his party and his nation to a new kind of international responsibility. Now the world is changing again, rapidly and dramatically, and we must adapt to it. The United States-and the Republican Party-can lead the way to this new world, or they can be left behind. I am confidence that our country and our party will choose to lead. STATEMENT OF STEPHEN M. YOUNG, U.S. SENATOR FROM THE STATE OF Oinio ARE WE MISSING THE BOAT? Trade between eastern and western Europe is surging ahead by almost 20% a year. Witness the following dramatic increases in western European exports to eastern Europe from 1961 to 1966: France-$240 million to $387 million; Italy-$216 million to $357 million; England-$259 million to $410 million; West Germany-$473 million to $696 million; Si~ain-$15 million to $57 million; Switzerland-$66 million to $112 million. During this period U.S. exports to eastern Europe increased from $135 million to only $198 million. West European industrialists have established a strong foothold in the fastest growing market in the world for industrial goods-those 350 million people who live under Communist rule from Prague to Vladivostok. West European firms have built or are building approximately 150 factories throughout eastern Europe and the Soviet Union and more contracts are on the way. Italy's Fiat Company con- cluded `an $890 million agreement to `build a plant in the `Soviet Union to produce 730,000 cars a year. While members of the Common Market have abolished import restrictions on eastern European products, we still maintain trade bar- riers which discriminate against American businessmen, farmers and working men and women. Increased trade ha's forced many `communist governments to institute sweeping economic reforms in order to make their products more corn- petitive in `both price and quality. Increased trade from America with European communist nations will also provide a powerful political tool to woo them to- ward peace, complete independence of Russia and consumer orientation. Trade makes for good neighbors. Good neighbors make for peace. {Excerpt from Congressional Record, March 28, 1968] LICENSING OF GRAVITY METER TO POLAND Considerable public interest has developed respecting the issuance of a license by the Department of Commerce for the export of `a gravity meter to Poland. PAGENO="0071" 503 To satisfy this interest, the salient facts surrounding the transaction and the Department's action are set forth in this `brief statement. Several months ago, the Department of Commerce received an application for a license to export a land-based gravity meter with accessories, valued at $10,200, to the Polish Institute of Geodesy and Cartography in Warsaw, Poland, for the stated purpose of conducting geological research and geodetic measurements. It was learned through a field check that this instrument was to be used `to com- plete the geodetic mapping program sponsored by the International Association of Geodesy, of which the United States is a member. The Soviet meter which the Polish Institute had been using was considered too heavy for u'se in the mountainous terrain of southern Poland; for this reason the more portable United States meter was desired. Gravity meters are used to measure variations in the intensity of the earth's gravity. Such measurements are made for various purposes. The primary use of the data relates to geophysical prospecting for petroleum and other mineral deposits, scientific studies to `determine the shape of the earth, and geophysical research o'f the earth's structure. Over 95 percent of the United States `production of the meter sought by the Poles has been used to develop data for these pur- poses. Gravity data obtained by the use of all types of gravity meters are also' used by the military to establish gravity values at each launch site to calibrate the acceleration of the inertial guidance system and t'o prepare a network of gravity infrornation for trajectory improvement. The Communist countries of Eastern Europe have, however, already collected a large amount of land gravity data; consequently, their primary requirement today so far as ballistic and mili- tary purpo'ses are concerned is for data respecting the vast areas of the earth covered by water. To conduct gravity surveys over water, a specially designed seaborne meter is needed. The landbased meter desired by Poland cannot be used for this purpose. Production and technology of the various types of land gravity meters are not confined to the United States. For several years a meter of this type has been produced in Canada with features and capabilities equal to the American instru- ment. The production and calibration of this type meter are thus not limited to American technicians. Other meters whose accuracy and sensitivity for military end use are comparable to the subject meter are also available to Communist countries from capable instrument manufacturers in West Germany and Sweden. These land gravity meters are not suhject to international control by the group of countries that maintain an embargo on the shipment of strategic commodities to Communist countries. In the past few years non-United States producers have sold more than a hundred land gravity meters to Communist countries. For these reasons, and taking into account that only a single instrument was involved, the Department concluded that issuance of a license was appropriate. Subsequently, the applicant/licensee informed the Department that he was terminating his interest in `the transaction and asked that the license be can- celled. This has been done. STATEMENT ON HENRY J. TAYLOR SYNDICATED COLUMNS ON LICENSING OF LT.S. GOODS TO EASTERN EUROPE Considerable public interest has been aroused by two articles written by Henry J. Taylor in October and December 1966, mentioning a number of commodities and data that had been licensed for export or reexport to Eastern Europe. To deal with this interest, the Department of Commerce (Office of Export Con- trol) has prepared a brief statement of the salient features of each case cited by Mr. Taylor. Where his descriptions were precise, the Department has been able to identify its licensing actions and to be specific in its statement. When the corn- inodities have been described in vague or general terms, only general comments could be made. In issuing these licenses, the Department considered a variety of factors to as- sure that the export in question would not make a significant contribution to the military or economic potential of these countries that would prove detrimental to the national security and welfare of the United States. Prominent among these factors are: the nature of the commodity, its normal usage, and its strategic potential; the intended end-use of the commodity and the likelihood that it may be diverted from peaceful uses to strategic uses; the availability to Eastern Europe of comparable equipment in other free world countries that could render any denial of a U.S'. license ineffective; and the significance of any advanced PAGENO="0072" 504 technology that might be extractable from the commodity. Consultation with other interested agencies of the government is undertaken on policy problems and on significant specific export license applications. FERTILIZER PLANTS Technical Data for Anunonia, Nitric Acid, Ammoninrn Nitrate, and Urea Plants Various-Licenses for U.S.S.R. The Department of Commerce has issued licenses authorizing the export to the Soviet Union of both quotation and substantive data for fertilizer plants to produce ammonia, nitric acid, ammonia nitrate, and nitrogen solutions. (A li- cense for quotation data does not cover specific design and technical data required to build and operate a plant. It covers only the information necessary to permit the submission of a bid.) In most cases quotation licenses have not been followed up with applications for licenses to provide technical data for the plants. The countries of Eastern Europe, including the Soviet Union, have been buying a substantial number of fertilizer plants and there is keen competition among the various Western countries capable of supplying them. METAL CUTTING MACHINES Licensed 9-15-66 for Bulgaria This license authorized the shipment to Bulgaria of three machines for the precision grinding of ball tracks on the inner races of ball bearings with bore diameter of 0.75 inch to 4.5 inches. Actual export was not made because the li- censee lost the order and returned the license unused. In general, ball bearings comprise three basic components: the ball assembly, an outer race, and an inner race. Each component must be processed through an intricate sequence of ma- chining, grinding, honing, cleaning, and other operations that require a number of different types of machines. The quality of the finished ball bearings depends on how well all of the machines perform all of these operations. The precision grinders covered by this license perform only one of these operations on one com- ponent. They are not used in the manufacture of miniature, sub-miniature, or very large bearings. Denial of U.S. exports would not have been effective in preventing Bulgaria from obtaining quality grinding machines for its bearing plant, since precision grinders are available in several West European countries. These countries do not consider such grinding machines to be strategic and readily allow exports to Eastern Europe. ELECTROLYTIC TINNING LINE Technical data licensed 4-4-66 for Bulgaria Data for construction of an electrolytic tinning line, for annual production of 50,000 metric tons tinned steel strip and sheet. A main use of tinned steel is for making tin cans, and primary uses are civilian oriented. Comparable technology is available abroad. RAW MATERIALS FOR DYNAMITE Bulgaria There is no record of licensing commodities to Bulgaria for use in making dynamite. CONTINUOUS STEEL STRIP GALVANIZING LINE Technical data licensed 8-8-66 for Bulgaria Data for a galvanizing line to produce 100,000 metric tons per year of zinc coated steel strip 28"-GO" wide. Galvanized steel has a variety of civilian uses, including roofing, siding, eve troughs, metal lath, garbage cans, etc. Comparable technology and equipment are available from foreign sources. TURBINE AND GENERATOR Technical data licensed 1-19-66 for Bulgaria Data for quotation, installation, maintenance, and repair of a subcritical steam turbine and generator of 200 `MW capacity, to be manufactured in Japan using PAGENO="0073" 505 U.S. technology. Manufacturing data will not be reexported from Japan to Bulgaria. The relatively small capacity indicates public utility use. West Eu- ropean firms and the U.S.S.R. makes this size equipment with no U.S. technology. AIRBORNE RADAR EQUIPMENT, AIRBORNE NAVIGATION EQDIPMENT AND DEVICES T7arious licenses for Hungary and Bulgaria The Department has, over the past several years, licensed a Variety of airborne navigation, communication, and radar equipment for export to East European destinations, when necessary for air safety. For example, the equipment we licensed under the general heading of "airborne radar equipment" was air traffic control radar beacon systems. This is a limited range system permitting the air traffic control center on the ground to interrogate each aircraft within the air- port's traffic control pattern and reecive an automatic response identifying the aircraft. We have also licensed the necessary related ground equipment and test instruments to support the airborne equipment. Licenses for such equipment are issued only when the airborne equipment will be used on civil aircraft of East European countries, the related ground equip- ment and test instruments are required for servicing and maintaining civil air- craft in Eastern Europe, the equipment is within the range of International Civil Aviation Organization recommended standards, and the number, type, and characteristics of the equipment are reasonable for the stated end use. The U.S. has a valid interest in seeing that all civil aircraft using the same airspace and airports as U.S. and other free world planes are equipped for the safest possible operation. To further this goal, the U1S. supports the efforts of the ICAO to secure, on a worldwide basis, the highest practicable degree of uni- formity in the provision of radio navigation aids and communication facilities. Failure of any civil aircraft in international service to conform with ICAO stand- ards would cause an unnecessary hazard to passengers, other aircraft, and per- sons on the ground. VACUUM GAUGES Licensed 8-10-66 for Hungary These were vacuum gauges for general laboratory use, of a type that has been commonly available for about 30 years. This license covered 4 vacuum gauges. This equipment is also available from U.K., France, Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. The license was returned unused and cancelled 10-13-06. RAILWAY EQUIPMENT Various reea~ports from ~wcden to Hungary These shipments consisted of replacement parts for maintenance of 20 diesel electric locomotives manufactured in Sweden with some U.S. components and shipped to Hungary about 3 years ago. The parts that have been authorized are considered appropriate for normal maintenance of these locomotives. Comparable locomotives containing no U.S. components are readily available abroad. RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASURING EQUIPMENT TTairious licenses for Hungary and Czechoslovakia The use of nuclear radiation detection and measuring equipment, especially isotope scanners, has become a well-established method for medical diagnosis. The machines are used in conjunction with radio isotopes to map areas of the body for studies of pathological conditions and for planning surgery. Practically all exports of nuclear radiation detection and measuring instruments have been to medical and biological research institutes, hospitals and clinics, for the pur- poses described above. In addition, there have been a few exports of nuclear measuring instruments for such uses as determination of moisture in soils and newly-laid concrete or asphalt roads. The market for all such apparatus is highly competitive. Equipment comparable to U.S. products is available from the United Kingdom, France, West Germany, Netherlandis, Sweden, and Japan. Such equipment does not involve advanced technology and has no important strategic use. PAGENO="0074" 506 HYDROGEN PLANT Technical data licensed 2-17-66 for Czechoslovakia Technical data for erection of a relatively small (14 million cubic feet per day) hydrogen plant at a refinery in `Syria. License was necessary because primary contractor is `Czechoslovakian and would have access to U.S. technology. U.S. does not have effective unilateral control over such data. `The dat'a were to be reexported from Holland to `Syria. MILL FOR MANUFACTURING ALUMINUM TUBING AND COILS Licensed D-8-66 for Czechoslovakia One complete mill for producing aluminum tubing from 3/4" to 4%" outside dia- meter. Capacity would vary from 40 to 2~0 feet per minute depending on size of the tubing being produced. Included is one complete slitting line for aluminum coils. The mill would produce light gauge aluminum tubing for irrigation pipe and furniture manufacture. The mill cannot roll aluminum alloy tubing to aero- space tolerances and cannot be employed feasibly to roll stainless steels, the refractory metals, or other hard strategic materials. Comparable equipment is available from foreign sources. NONMILITARY PYROTECHNICAL ROCKET ENGINES Licensed 5-24-66 for Czechoslovakia These "rocket engines" were 300 toy propellant devices value at 25c each. They consisted of a mixture of potassium nitrate, sulphur, and charcoal sealed in a rolled paper tubing. Average size of each device was 21/2" x 34". Three rockets would be sealed in a waterproof paper container about 9" x 114". The devices were taken to Czechoslovakia by U.S. citizens for display and demonstration at an international rocketry meet. Any devices not expended in demonstration were to be returned to the U.S. DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS, ELECTRONIC COMPUTERS, AND PARTS Various licenses for East Germany and Czechoslovakia The Office of Export Control has licensed a number of computers to various countries in Eastern Europe, after careful scrutiny of applications to assure that the computers were types normally used only for peaceful purposes and would not make a significant contribution to a military or other strategic program even if they were diverted to such use. The licenses that have been issued have been for computers that normally are used in such commercial operations as banking, inventory control and economic planning. In each instance, equivalent computers have been available from non-U.S. sources, so that rejecting the application would not have been effective in preventing the export of an equivalent computer. The Office `of Export Control also has approved the use of U.S. components and pe- ripheral equipment in foreign-built computers under conditions similar to those for which U.S. computers are approved. VIRGIN MERCURY Licensed 4-27-66 for East Germany This was prime virgin mercury of Mexican origin, entered into the U.S. under Customs bond. This mercury is for use in production of chemical products and is not considered strategic. Grounds for denial on short supply basis did not exist in this case as the mercury was of foreign origin and had not entered into the commerce of the U.S. ROTARY COMBUSTION ENGINES Technical data licensed 5-12-66 for East Germany The engines are small horsepower types suitable for outboard motors, small automobiles, and other light equipment. They are not suitable for aircraft use. The basic design of the engine is foreign. The U.S. technology applies only to modifications and applications developed by the U.S. firm. PAGENO="0075" 507 STEEL AND COPPER MILL TECHNOLOGY Various licenses for East Germany and Rumania Technical data for a twin stand tandem temper mill and a single stand reversing cold Strip rolling mill were licensed for reexport from the U.K. to East Germany. Similar data have been licensed for export to Rumania, as well as data for bloom- ing mills, slabbing mills, slitting and shearing equipment and finishing lines. Much of this equipment can be used ii~ an integrated steel mill, but the United States has not licensed complete integrated mills. We also have authorized the export of data for a copper rod mill. Copper rods are usually drawn into copper wire, which, along with steel sheet and strip, is widely used in all sectors of the economy. Because similar data and equipment for steel and copper mills are available abroad, licenses were issued to enable U.S. firms to bid against foreign competition. Few of these licenses actually resulted in transactions, however, because West European and Japanese firms have been able to offer better pric- ing, financing, and delivery. CHEMICAL ANTIOZONANT FOR SYNTHETIC RUBBER Licensed 8-8-66 for Rumania Antiozonants are used to counteract the deteriorating action of ozone on rubber, which results in cracking of the product and reduces the rubber's flexibility. Rub- ber so treated has a wide variety of uses in such products as flooring, sheeting, tires, and collapsible tanks for outdoor storage. Antiozonants are readily available from firms in Western Europe. PIPELINE CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSORS Technical data licensed 4-8-66 for Rumania Necessary data to permit French licensee to quote on two centrifugal com- pressors for a 20" diameter gas pipeline in Rumania. Similar compressors are available from European firms, some of which were bidding against the French licensee. The compressors cannot be used for transmission of oil. The pipeline is considered reasonable and necessary to the civilian economy of Rumania, for supplying natural gas to homes and industry. HORIZONTAL PRECISION BORING MACHINE Licensed 9-23-66 for Rumania One boring machine for manufacture of automobile pistons. Maximum size of the pistons that can be manufactured with this machine is 38%", which is about the size that was used in U.S. autos 10 years ago. The pistons would be distrib- uted in Rumania and other European countries. The machine was to be partially tooled in the U.S., with final tooling to be completed in Western Europe. Similar equipment for producing pistons is available from many foreign firms. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVERS Licensed 5-26-66 for Poland One radio communications receiver was licensed for export to a telecommuni- cations institute in Poland. The receiver was to be used in testing and monitoring telecommunications equipment. Suitable receivers for this use are readily avail- able from foreign sources. REFRIGERATOR COMPRESSORS Technical data licensed 5-4-66 for Poland Data for the manufacture of fractional horsepower electric refrigerator com- pressors. The data will be reexported from Italy. The compressors will be manu- factured in Poland and sold on the Polish market for use in refrigeration equip- ment. Comparable data are available from foreign sources. PAGENO="0076" 508 STYRENE PLANT Data licensed 8-3-66 for Poland The Department licensed technical data for construction of a styrene plant in Poland. The plant would produce 30,000 metric tons of styrene from ethylene and benzene. Styrene is used for a wide variety of plastic products such as foams, packaging, appliances, synthetic rubber, and phonograph records. Comparable data are commonly available from other sources. OIL FIRED STEAM GENERATORS Technical data licensed 1-19-66 for Poland Data for construction of at least 12 subcritical oil-fired steam generators of relatively small 120 MW capacity. Data are to be reexported from the U.K. This equipment could be shipped direct to Poland from the U.S. under general license authorization. Comparable data and equipment are readily available from for- eign sources. GRINDING MACHINES Technical data licensed 5-24-66 for Poland Data relating to the manufacture of two models external cylindrical grinding machines. These are relatively simple, inexpensive, general purpose grinding machines, comparable to many models built in Eastern and Western Europe. Primary use of these machines is in job shops and tool rooms. They are not equipped with numerical control systems. These are not considered to be stra- tegic, and are needed for the civilian economy of Poland. Manufacture of these machines in Poland would help that country to become less dependent on Czecho- slovakia and the U.S.S.R. for such equipment. TESTIMONY BEFORE FOREIGN AFFAIRS EUROPEAN SUBCOMMITTEE BY ANTHONY SOLOMON, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE FOR ECONOMIC AFFAIRS Question-How can we be sure that United States trade with Eastern Europe is not indirectly helping North Vietnam? What about specific exports criticized in Congressional or public correspondence? Answer.-Trade with the Communist countries of Eastern Europe is carried on under the Export Control Act of 1949, as amended, through the Security Control Regulations of the Department of Commerce. The Export Control Act provides that licenses are to be denied for exports that make a significant contribution to time military or economic potential of a Communist country, which would prove detrimental to the national security and welfare of the United States. Individual license applications are carefully reviewed and decided on the basis of this criterion. The regulations identify certain obviously peaceful items that may be sold and shipped without specific license applications. Paper and wood products are ex- amples. This list was expanded by some 400 items on October 12, 1966 in accord- ance with the President's announcement of October 7. Items to be exported to a Communist country that are not on this "general license" list must be individu- ally licensed. Of the latter group, items which have strategic significance, such as advanced computers and sophisticated Scientific equipment having military applications, are not licensed. Between these extremes of license-free trade and that which clearly cannot take place for security reasons, there is a wide spectrum of items that are ex- amined with great care on a case-by-case basis before a license is approved or denied-for example, a computer that woulid normally be used for retail inven- tory control, but which might have less peaceful applications. Advanced plants, machinery and equipment, and advanced technology are more likely to require detailed review under the Export Control Act than, for example, consumer goods. However, if the products of any such item of equipment or of such technology pose no threat to the security and welfare of the United States, such equipment or technology can be licensed for export. PAGENO="0077" 509 We expect that our export controls will continue to limit the war-niaking potential of other countries while permitting normal trade in goods with little if any military significance. Following are comments on particular items whose export has been criticized in Congressional or public correspondence. NITROCEILULOSE There have been no shipments of nitrocellulose to the USSR. The commodity involved was chemidal woodpulp, which is used chiefly by the chemical conversion industries for the manufacture of rayon yarn, plastics, transparent film, ex- plosives, paints, lacquers, and paper products. The chemical woodpulp that was licensed was the dissolving grade used for the manufacture of tire cord and cellu- lose acetate for textiles. Nitroceilulose for exiosives and solid rocket fuels is prorn duced from cheaper grades of chemical woodpulp that are widely available in European countries, including the Soviet Union. DIETHYLENE GLYCOL This commodity is used almost exclusively in the production of civilian goods. In the United States, about 87 percent of our total consumption of diethylene glycol is in the manufacture of antifreeze for automobiles. The remainder is used mainly in the production of resins, plasticizers, products for lubricating fibers and textiles, and as a moisture-retaining substance in such goods as tobacco, ink, glue, cork, dyes, and cellophane. Only a minor fraction of the U.S. consumption of diethylene glycol is in the manufacture of some of the ingredients of explosives. In the process of explosives manufacture, however, several complex and expan- sive processing steps are required to convert diethylene glycol into a material having explosive cl~aracteristics. Diethylene glycol is not known to have direct or indirect use in the production of liquid rocket propellants. POLYVINYL BUTYRAL This chemical is used mainly in the manufacture of peaceful items. When in the form of film or sheeting, it is used as component of shatter-proof glass, which in turn finds its principal application in automobiles, trucks, busses and railway cars. Only a minor portion of this production is in the form of bullet resistant glass. The product that was licensed for export, however, was in the form of i)Owder and was, moreover, of a chemical type that ccii not be processed readily into film suitable for use in the production of safety glass. Its principal applica- tion is in the formulation of paints, varnishes, and protective coatings for various types of consumer goods. AIRBORNE RADAR NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT AND DEVICE5 These types of equipment are shipped to European Communist countries to assure acceptable standards of air safety in civil aircraft. This is in accordance with the objectives of the International Civil Aviation Organizatioon, of which the United States is a member. It is United States policy to encourage the pur- chase of safety equipment by foreign airlines, following a finding that the export would not niake a significant strategic contribution to the importing country. Each case is subject to interagency examination. ELECTRONIC COMPUTERS (AND PARTS) Computers whose technical specifications do not exceed certain levels and which will be used for banking, inventory controls, economic planning, or other such peaceful purposes are exported to European Communist countries. Such a computer is exported only when the United States believes it to be unlikely that the computer will be diverted to strategic use. FERTILIZER PLANTS The Department of Commerce has issued licenses authorizing the export to the Soviet Union of both quotation and substantive data for fertilizer plants to produce ammonia, nitric acid, ammonia nitrate, and nitrogen solutions. (A license for quotation data does not cover specific design and technical data required to build and operate a plant. It covers only the information necessary to permit the submission of a bid.) In most cases quotation licenses have not been followed up PAGENO="0078" 510 with applications for licenses to provide technical data for the plants. The coun- tries of Eastern Europe, including the Soviet Union, have been buying a substan- tial number of fertilizer plants and there is keen competition among the various Western countries capable of supplying them but most orders have gone to West- ern European companies. GRAVITY METERS The licensing of two land-based gravity meters for export to Romania is consistent with the policy of permitting exports that are determined to be rea- sonable and necessary to the Romanian civilian economy. Gravity meters are used to measure variations in the intensity of the earth's gravity. Such measure- ments are made for various purposes. The primary use of the data relates to geophysical prospecting for petroleum and other mineral deposits, scientific studies to determine the shape of the earth, and geophysical research of the earth's structure. Over 95 percent of the United States production of the type of meter exported to Romania has been used to develop data for these purposes. Gravity data obtained by the use of all types of gravity meters are also used by the military to establish gravity values at each launch site to calibrate the ac- celeration of the intertial guidance system and to prepare a network of gravity information for trajectory improvement. The Communist countries of Eastern Europe have, however, already collected a large amount of land gravity data. In contrast, there is a relative dearth of gravity data for the ocean areas. Thus, while there is a continuing need by the Communist countries for additional land data to complete and refine existing surveys, their primary requirement today so far as ballistic and military purposes are concerned is believed to be for data respecting the vast areas of the earth covered by water. To conduct gravity surveys over water, a specially designed seaborne meter is used. The land-based meters shipped to Romania cannot be used for this purpose. Production and technology of the various types of land gravity meters are not confined to the United States. For several years a meter of this type has been produced in Canada with features and capabilities equal to the American instru- ment. The production aild calibration of this type meter are thus not limited to Anierican technicians. Another meter whose accurancy and sensitivity for mili- tary end use is comparable to the subject meter is also prdouced in West Ger- many. These land gravity meters are not subject to international control by the group of countries that maintain an embargo on the shipment of strategic com- inodities to Communist countries. In the past few years non-United States pro- ducers have sold a significant number of land gravity meters to Communist countries. FOUR HUNDRED COMMODITIES PLACED UNDER GENERAL LICENSE FOR EXPORT TO EAST EUROPE These commodities (as well as a large number of others placed under general license over the years) were placed under general license to East Europe (ex- cluding the Soviet Zone of Germany) because the United States believes that they can be freely exported without risk of the United States national interest. Before the general license went ixito effect, a shipment of any one of these commodi- ties to Eastern European countries other than Poland and Romania required an individual validated license. Placing them under generai license merely re- duces the administrative burden of American businessmen and of the Govern- ment. It should be emphasized that it was not a case of changing the ratings of these items from strategic to non-strategic in one day. It was rather a change from validated license requirement to a general license. [Excerpt from subcommittee print of House Committee on Banking and Currency entitled "The Fiat-Soviet Auto Plant and Communist Economic Reforms"J USSR: ABOUT To ENTER THE AUTOMOTIVE AGE? SUMMARY The widely publicized Soviet decision to boost production of automobiles* brings the USSR one step nearer the automotive age. However, announced plans are not so grandiose as to require a significant alteration in traditional Soviet *The term automoible as used throughout this report refers to passenger automobiles~ the term motor vehicles includes not only automobiles but also trucks and buses. PAGENO="0079" 511 economic priorities, and would leave military and space programs unimpaired. Even with the usual slippage in Soviet construction plans, output of automobiles probably could accelerate to 460,000 by 1970 and to 1.1 million by 1975. This would provide the Soviet Union with an automobile stock roughly equal to that of the United States in 1917, and, on a per capita basis, about 5 percent of the current US inventory. Perspective can be gained by projecting Soviet per capita avail- abilities to 1975 and comparing them with the inventories that already exist in Western European countries; in each case, the Soviet expectation is a small fraction of the realized Western level. Essentially, the new Soviet program is designed to produce automobiles for the bureaucratic and managerial elite, not for the average citizen. By the early 1970's perhaps half of the automobiles produced will be available for public purchase, rather than for government use. It seems certain that, within the next decade at least, the Soviet leadership not only has no plans to mass pro- duce automobiles in imitation of the West, but would strenuously resist internal pressure to do so. Although the USSR may some day join the circle of nations that provide automobiles for the average citizen, that day is not now in sight. Direct investment needed to fill the present Soviet program will be about $1.2 billion,** of which $800 million is planned for the construction of a Fiat auto- mobile plant in the USSR: The French firm of Renault may play a role in re- constructing the present Moskvich plant; other facilities will be expanded by the USSR itself. Through 1970, the investment will represunt less than 1A of 1 percent of all Soviet investment in industry and 4 to 5 percent of machine building investment. Even these data overstate the burden, for repayment on the Fiat contract will stretch well into the 1970's. Indirect investment required for the supporting facilities for the production of steel, gasoline, and tires has not been fully calculated, but appears to be on the order of $400 million-substantially less than the direct investment. So-called tertiary investment-in highways, gasoline stations `and service facilities, motels, and the like-also needs to be added to the bill. An examina- tion of Soviet plans for highway `development during the next five years reveals that these call, for only a modest increase over the previous five years-about 20 percent in terms of kilometers, or an expenditure of about $1.2 billion a year. Road density in the USSR by 1975 will be considerably `below that of most Western European countries and the United States. Furthermore, We'stern ex- perience demonstrates that for several decades after a country begins the accelera- tion of automoblie production, the tempo of supporting investments increases on'ly slowly. Not until there is a large, widely distributed stock of automobiles does a rapid acceleration take place. Some amelioration in the Spartan level of service and maintenance facilities will be needed. At present, there are only eight gasoline stations and eight garages in Moscow. If the Soviet regime increases the number of such facilities at the same rate as in the past, the cost by 1975 would be about $175 million. The lack of adequate maintenance facilities is reflected in the fact that approxi- mately one-fifth of the automobiles in the Soviet motor inventory are normally out of service, awaiting repairs. EXCERPT FROM STATEMENT BY SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE, ORVILLE L. FREEMAN, BEFORE HousE COMMITTEE ON `WAYS AND MEANS, PUBLIC HEARINGS ON TARIFF AND TRADE PROPOSALS, JUNE 10, 1908 We must not forget about East-West trade possibilities. Our trade in agricul- tural products with Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union is small at the moment. But consumer income and demand in these countries continue to rise. The poten- tial is `there. In time, I `think, we `~an expand this trade if we can eliminate special cost or regulatory hinderances and see our way clear to grant most- favored-nation treatment to all the countries of the area as we now do to Poland and Yugoslavia. Trade, I think, could eventually lead the way toward closer cooperation between Ea'St and West as well as to expanded business for all concerned. SUMMARY: TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS WITH EASTERN EUROPE U.S. `trade in agricultural commodities with the Eastern European countries, including the USSR, has been relatively small. U.S. exports to these countries in recent years (with the exception of 1963 and 1964 when we sold a sub- **Expressed in curren't U.S. dollars, unless otherwise indicated. PAGENO="0080" 512 stantial quantity of wheat and feed grains as a result of the short 1063 Russian grain crop) has averaged roughly 31/2 percent of the total U.S. agricultural exports. At the same time agricultural imports from these countries also have been small, currently running about 1.6 percent of total agricultural imports. This trade is summarized in the attached table. There are roughly 120 million people in the East European countries exclusive of the USSR, and their incomes have been increasing at an average rate of about 41/2 percent per year in recent years. As their incomes have been increasing they have been upgrading their diets and placing more stress on consumption of livestock products. Eastern Europe and the USSR are major world grain producing countries, and in recent years have also been net importers. Over the longer pull we look towards increased production of animal products and increasing feed grain and protein meal requirements in the Eastern zone countries. Our ability to capture an important share of this business will depend upon our ability to meet competition from other suppliers. Recently there has been a significant increase in production of oil-seeds in the USSR with large quantities of sunflower and more recently cottonseed oil being sold on world markets. Although the East European countries are major importers and users of cotton, the United States has not succeeded in capturing a significant share of this business on a commercial basis. Most of the East European cotton needs have been supplied by Russia with the balance obtained largely through bilateral business with Middle East suppliers. There are some impediments to expanding trade with East European countries: (a) Only Poland and Yugoslavia now enjoy the Most Favored Nations treat- ment in the United States. (b) We have a general requirement that at least 50 percent of our com- mercial grain shipments in full ship loads to East European countries must be carried in U.S. bottoms. This requirement, which does not apply to Poland and Romania, adds about $6 to $10 per ton to the delivered cost of U.S. grains. P.L. 480 transactions provided the basis for substantial shipments of wheat, feed grains, and cotton to Poland until 1905 and Yugoslavia until 1967. These countries are no longer eligible for P.L. 480 programming under the Findley- Beleher Amendment which prohibits P.L. 480 sales for foreign currencies to Communist countries and all P.L. 480 sales to countries trading wi'th Cuba and North Vietnam. U.S. agricultural exports to East European countries are eligible for CCC export credits. In 1906 and 1907 about $83 million worth of credit had been extended for shipments of mainly wheat, feed grains, and cotton to Poland, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. As of the first of the year $51 million worth of credit remained available for shipments to Poland, Yugo- slavia, and Czechoslovakia. Recently some of the East European countries appear to be less dependent upon the USSR as a source of agricultural commodities than they were in previous years. They are thus more influenced by competitive factors in world trade, and will place more of their purchases where they are able to make the most advantageous bargains. VALUE AND PERCENTAGE SNARE OF U.S. AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH EASTERN EUROPE' AND SOVIET UNION, 1955-59 AVERAGE AND ANNUAL 1960-66 [Dollar amounts in miilionsj Calendar year Eastern Europe and U.S.S.R. Exports to- Imports from- All countries Percent of total Eastern Europe and U.S.S.R. All countries Percent of total Average: 1955-59 $151 $3,933 3.8 $35 $3,924 0.9 1960 170 4, 824 3. 5 46 3, 825 1. 2 1961 177 5,030 3.5 47 3,690 1.3 1962 188 5,031 3.7 52 3,876 1.3 1963 259 5,585 4.6 45 4,011 1.1 1964 402 6, 347 6. 3 51 4, 082 1. 3 1965 210 6,229 3.3 66 4,088 1.6 1966 255 6, 879 3. 7 73 4, 492 1. 6 1 Eastern Europe includes Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, Rumania, and Yugoslavia. PAGENO="0081" 513 RUSSIA General-It is estimated that the per capita gross national product in Russia, a country of 230 million people, was about $1300 in 1965. We also estimate that about half of the per capita disposable income (approximately $650) is used to purchase food, compared with less than 20 percent of the disposable income in the United States. Following the short grain crop in 1903 Russian grain production has recovered significantly. We estimate the 1907 grain harvest at around 125 million metric tons, compared with 141 million last year (the highest in Soviet history) and 90 million metric tons in 1963. Agricultural exports to Eastern European countries, principally grains, cotton, oilseeds, are exchanged for capital goods from those countries, largely on a bilateral basis. COMMODITY NOTES Grains-Soviet exports of grain have averaged about 4 million metric tons annually in recent years. About 80 percent of this is exported to Eastern Europe. Oliseeds and products-Sunflower seed production, the major oilseed crop, nearly reached in 1967 the 1966 record level. Exports of sunflower seed oil were 456 thousand metric tons in 1960, half of which went to hard currency countries. Gotton.-The best Soviet earner of foreign exchange. Exports of cotton in 1966 were 508 thousand metric tons, 25 percent of which went to hard currency countries. ~Sugar beets-Production reached a record level in 1967. Exports of refined sugar in 1966 exceeded 900 thousand metric tons, of which 80 percent went to bard currency countries. Livestock and meat products-The USSR is not expected to export livestock or meat products on commercial world markets. It is expected that the USSR will need to develop a commercial feed supplement industry to assist expanding production of livestock products for the domestic market. Trade in agricultural products witlt the United 8tates Principal U.S. exports to USSR (averaged $35 million during past two years) tallow, hides. Principal U.S. imports from USSR (averaged $2 million during past two years) : cotton linters, licorice root. EAST GERMANY General-The per capita gross national product in East Germany, a country of 17 million people, was $1,480 in 1965. Next to Czechoslovakia this was the highest in the East European countries. The per capita GNP had been increasing in East Germany at a rate of 3.7 percent annually since 1960. About 46 percent of the disposable national income is spent on food in East Germany. In recent years retail prices of most foods have remained relatively stable. Purchase prices of farm products have increased gradually, but the increases have not been passed on to the consumer. COMMODITY NOTES Grains.-Total grain production averages about 5 million tons annually, fluctuating widely from year to year. Feed grain consumption in 1965 and 1966 was nearly 3 million tons with imports contributing about 25 percent of this amount. Oilseeds and products-East Germany produces about 200 thousand tons of rapeseed annually. In addition, East Germany imports about 150 thousand tons of oil bearing materials annually, primarily sunflower seed from the USSR. Cotton-East Germany consumes about 450 thousand bales of cotton annually, all imported. Russia provides about four-fifths of the imports with the balance from Egypt, Turkey, Syria and Sudan. Tobacco-East Germany imports tobacco from many countries. In 1965 and 1966 the United States exported an average of about 2 million pounds of tobacco to East Germany. Trade in agricultural products with the United States Principal U.S. exports to East Germany (averaged $15 million in past two years) : feed grains, wheat, tobacco. 97-627-OS-pt. 2-6 PAGENO="0082" 514 Principal U.S. imports from East Germany (averaged $0.1 million during past two years) : pigskins, canned hams. ROMANIA General-The per capita gross national product in Romania, a country of 19 million people, is estimated at $743 in 1965. It had been increasing at a rate of 8.3 percent per year over the preceding 5 years. About 42 percent of the dis~ posable national income in Romania is spent for food. Romania has the best natural conditions for agriculture in Eastern Europe. Over 65 percent of the total population is rural and about 55 percent of the labor force is employed by agriculture. Agricultural production in Romania has been rising about 3 percent a year, but the increase in production of livestock products has been less. Retail prices of consumer commodities are fixed by central authorities. The Government in- tends to continue to control retail prices in order to increase the real income of workers. COMMODITY NOTES Grains-Grain production has been increasing moderately in recent years. Romania currently exports between 500,000 and 800,000 metric tons of corn annually. Oilseecls and products.-Romania is the largest producer of sunflower seed in Eastern Europe with average annual production of about 550,000 metric tons. Exports of sunflower seed oil exceed 50,000 tons annually. Cotton.-Romania consumes around 350,000 bales of cotton annually, all im- ported. in 1965, 40 percent of imports came from USSR, but Soviet proportion is declining, 25 percent from UAR, 20 percent from Syria, little other. U.S. share bad been higher but down to 500 bales in 1905. Tobaeco.-Romania produces largely oriental tobacco and is both an importer and an exporter of tobacco. Trade in agrienltnral prodncts with the United ~States Principal U.S. exports to Romania (averaged $4.4 million during past two years) bides, tallow. Principal U.S. imports from Romania (averaged $0.6 million during past two years) : cheese, spices, walnuts. POLAND General-The per capita gross national product in Poland, a country of 32 million people, was $948 in 1905. It had been growing at a rate of 4.9 percent per year since 1960. About 45 percent of the disposable national income in Poland is spent for food. Since 1960 per capita cons.umption of meat increased 12 percent, milk and eggs increased sharply, and bread and potatoes declined. Prices to producers and to consumers, especially for meat and dairy products, have risen substantially in recent years. The State plan for 1966-70 aims to increase crop production by 17 percent and livestock production by 11 percent. The plan is to increase livestock produc- tion by expanding feedgrains production and also to reduce wheat imports. COMMODITY NOTES Grain.s.-Poland traditionally has been the major grain deficit country in East Europe. Production has remained steady at around 14 million metric tons and imports averaged 2.5 million tons per year. U.S. shipments to Poland were reduced in 1965, reflecting the expiration of Title I, P.L. 480 exports to Poland. In 1966 and 1967, an average of over $16 million worth of U.S. grains were shipped to Poland under the CCC credit program. Oilseeds and products.-~Poiand produces rapeseed, imports substantial quan- tities of peanuts and palm kernels from Africa and soybeans from the United States and Communist China. Poland also imports U.S. soybean meal. Uotton.-Consumption in Poland has increased to 700,000 bales last year, all of it imported. More than 50 percent from the USSR with Soviet proportion increasing. Importing also from UAR, Iran, Pakistan, and Syria. The United States shipped from 40 to 140,000 bales annually under P.L. 480 which terminated after 1964. U.S. shipped about 50,000 bales in 1966 and 1967 under CCC credit. Tobaceo.-Poland has increased domestic production, and imported largely PAGENO="0083" 515 oriental leaf from Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Turkey to augment its own supplies. Trade in agricultural products with United ~tates Principal U.S. exports to Poland (averaging $35 million during past 2 years): wheat, feed grains, soybeans and meal, hides, tallow. Principal U.S. imports from Poland (averaging $41 million during past 2 years) : canned hams, canned pork, casein. BULGARIA General.-The per capita gross national product in Bulgaria, a country of 8 million people, amounted to $731 in 1965. It had been increasing at a rate of 5.7 percent per year since 1960. About 44 percent of the disposable national income in Bulgaria is spentforfood. Since 1960 retail prices of bread and cereals remained fairly constant, but prices of meat, eggs, and butter increased sharply. During the past 10 years per capita consumption of meat and eggs increased by about one-half, while con- sumption of bread remained unchanged. Beginning in 1967, bonuses are paid by the government for increases in farm sales of livestock products above previous levels. Emphasis in the Bulgarian 1966-70 plan is on increasing the output of livestock products and livestock feed. COMMODITY NOTES Grains.-Bulgaria usually self-sufficient in grains. Production of all grains increasing with expanded livestock production. Imports of feed grains needed in years of short crops, but seldom amount to over 150,000 metric tons. Oilseeds and products.-Bulgaria is a major producer and exporter of sun- flower seed but has imported increasing amounts (25,000 tons in 1966) of U.S. soybean meal-preferred for poultry and hogs. Cotton.-Production small (about 50,000 bales) and imports increasing (about 200000 bales) to meet meal requirements. USSR provided nearly two-thirds of imports, but Soviet proportion decreasing. Also importing from FAR, Syria, Greece, and Brazil. Tobacco-Increasing production and exports. Might purchase some U.S. tobacco if offset by equivalent sales of Bulgarian tobacco to United States. Trade in agricultural products with United states Principal U.S. exports to Bulgaria (averaged $2 million during past 2 years) soybean meal, feed grains, tallow. Principal U.S. imports from Bulgaria (averaged $1.6 million during past 2 years) : paprika, cheese, rose oil. HUNGARY General.-The per capita gross national product in Hungary, a country of 10 million people, was $1,026 in 1965. The per capita GNP had been increasing at a rate of 4.1 percent since 1960. About 45 percent of the disposable national income in Hungary is spent for food. Farm prices have increased sharply in Hungary during recent years, after having been kept artificially low through compulsory deliveries. Largest increases in farm prices were for cattle, calves, sheep, and milk. Agricultural plans during 1966-70 are to introduce more market dictated production and less direct government control in order to increase agricultural production and exports. COMMODITY NOTES Grains.-Production holding steady-nearly 7 million metric tons in 1966. Imports of feed grains increasing, amounting to nearly 500,000 tons in 1965-66. USSR supplies 75 percent followed by Argentina and France. During 1966 the United States exported 70,000 tons of sorghum under CCC credit to Hungary. The growth in livestock production is expected to require feedgrain imports. Oilseeds and products.-Hungary exports sunfiowerseed and oil. Recently Hungary has imported U.S. soybeans and meal for poultry and livestock feed and this trade is expected to grow. Cotton-Cotton consumption in Hungary, currently around 350,000 bales, has been rising by 3-5 percent annually. All of it imported, with the Soviet share PAGENO="0084" 516 currently about 50 percent, gradually decreasing. Brazil, Egypt, Greece, and Turkey export cotton to Hungary. None from the United States during the past 4 years. Tobacco.-Production, consumption, and exports have increased in recent years. Imports are largely oriental leaf from Greece and Turkey. Trade in agricultural products with United States Principal U.S. exports to Hungary (averaged $8 million during past 2 years) soybeans, soybean meal, hides. Principal U.S. imports from Hungary (averaged $0.5 million during past 2 years) : wine, paprika. CzECHosLovAKIA General.-The per capita gross national product in Czechoslovakia in 1935, a country of 14 million people, was $1,530-the highest in the East European countries. The rate of increase in per capita national income since 1930 was only 1.2 percent per year, the lowest in the East European countries~ About 42 percent of the disposable national income in Czechoslovakia is spent for food. Since 1964 agricultural procurement prices have been increased several times for most farm crops and livestock products except pork and poultry. Further expansion of agriculture is limited. Significant increases in food consumption will require expansion of the already large agricultural imports. COMMODITY NOTES Grains-Production of all grains holding fairly steady, about 5.7 million metric tons in 1966. Feedgrain imports expanded with roughly 50 percent from USSR and 50 percent from the United States. Continued emphasis on increased live- stock production will require increasing feedgrain imports. Oilseeds and products-Czechoslovakia produces a minor quantity of rape- seed and imports substantial quantities of oilseeds. Prospects for increased U.S. exports of soybeans and soybean meal to Czechoslovakia appear promising. Gotton.-Czechoslovakia consumes 450,000 to 500,000 bales of cotton annually, all of which is imported. Russia supplies 50 percent and Egypt about 30 percent with balance from Brazil, Greece, Iran and Turkey. None from the United States. Tobacco.-Imports oriental tobaccos from Bulgaria and Yugoslavia with minor quantities from United States. Trade in agricultural products with United States Principal U.S. exports to Czechoslovakia (averaged $28 million during last 2 years) : feed grains, soybeans and oil and hides. Principal U.S. imports from Czechoslovakia (averaged $2 million during past 2 years) : canned hams, canned pork. YUGOSLAVIA General-The per capita gross national product in 1965 was $401-the lowest in the East European countries. It had been increasing at an average rate of 6.1 percent a year since 1960. About 54 percent of the disposable national income in Yugoslavia is spent for food. Yugoslavia leads Eastern Europe in the development of a market oriented socialist economy. Farm prices have risen sharply since 1963 as part of the Government's effort to have prices reflect scarcity more accurately and to adapt the economy of world market conditions. There is a strong movement to develop segments of the livestock industry for export. COMMODITY NOTES Grains.-Grain utilization, about 12 million tons annually, is increasing due to expanded livestock feeding. Import requirements, normally 1 to 1.5 million tons annually, have been largely wheat. Feed grain use, increasing gradually, has recently been about 7.5 million tons annually. In 1965 and 1966 the United States supplied all of the Yugoslav imports of wheat under P.L. 48~. In 1967 Yugoslavia imported 862,000 metric tons of U.S. wheat under the CCC credit program. PAGENO="0085" 517 Oilseeds and prodncts.-Yugoslavia is an important supplier of sunflowerseed, producing between 260 and 270,000 metric tons annually. Yugoslavia continues to be an important market for U.S. soybean meal and soybean oil. The United States supplied over 90 percent of Yugoslav imports of these commodities in 1965 and 196G. Cotton.-Cotton consumption in Yugoslavia has increased sharply and amounted to more than 400,000 bales in 1960. The United States supplied 40 percent of Yugoslavian cotton imports in 1966 with Title IV, P.L. 480 sales contributing to the U.S. share of the business. In 1967 the United States shipped about 10,000 bales of cotton to Yugoslavia under the CCC credit program. Tobacco.-Yugoslavia is an exporter of tobacco, mainly oriental and semi- oriental varieties. The United States is an important market for Yuogslav leaf. Trade in agricultural products with United states Principal U.S. exports to Yugoslavia (averaged $110 million during the past 2 years) : wheat, cotton, soybean meal and oil, and hides. Principal U.S. imports from Yugoslavia (averaged $21 million uring the past 2 years) : tobacco and canned hams. PAGENO="0086" GOVERNMENT AGENCIES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE, Washington, D.C., August 15, 1968. Mr. Huau SMITH, Sena~te Banking and Currency Committee, New Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. DEAR Mn. SMITH: In respon;se to Senator Mondale's request for a list of items that are unilaterally controlled to Eastern Europe and the USSR by the United States, I am sending you a marked copy of our Commodity `Control List. A num- ber of entries are also unilaterally controlled by the United States for export to area's outside of the Communist controlled countries. All entries that are not controlled `by the U.S. alone have been deleted. In examining the Commodity Control List, you will note that there `are a number of entries that appear to warrant general license treatment to Eastern Europe and the USSR. For many of these, however, th'ere are reasons for control that are not apparent. I can cite, for example, milk and cream (CCL entry `No. 022). In this ease the entry is kept under license control to Eastern Europe, Cuba and the Far Eastern Communist countries in view of the fact `that AID and Agriculture report a tight `supply of dry milk for AID programs. `Similarly, certain wheat, rice, barley, corn, rye, oats, sorghum, and cereal grains are con- trolled to these `destinations to permit us to implement the 50/50 shipping regu- lations. Self-contained air conditioners are controlled because there has been a chronic transshipment problem of this commodity to an embargoed destination. There are also some entries `on the Commodity Control List requiring licenses for Eastern Europe without real justification. Such items as prepared knots and tufts for broom or brush making, and animated displays for window dress- ing are examples. These and other similarly innocuous items are in the process of being removed from control so far a's shipments to Eastern Europe are concerned. Sincerely yours, RAUER H. MEYER, Director, Office of Export Control. (~518) PAGENO="0087" 519 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 196S Validated CLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc. license for shipments to provi- control commodity No. and com- Unit essing required for country groups* sions modity description No. country groups list* shown below* S T V N SECTION 0-FOOD AND LIVE ANIMALS DAIRY PRODUCTS AND EGGS 022 Milk and cream Lb.' 208 YZ CEREALS AND CEREAL PREPARATION. 04100 Other seed wheat Bu 208 YZ 04100 Other wheat, including spelt Bu 20S YZ or meslin, unmilled. 042 Rice, unmilled or milled. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c) (2).) 04300 Other seed barley. (See § 208 YZ 373.5(c)(2).) 04300 Other barley, unmilled. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c) (2).) 04400 Other seed corn 208 YZ 04400 Other corn, unmilled. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c)(2).) 04510 Other seed rye. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c)(2).) 04510 Other rye, unmilled. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c) (2) .) 04520 Other seed oats. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c) (2).) 04520 Other oats, unmilled. (See 208 YZ § 373.5(c)(2).) 04590 Other seed grain sorghum. 208 YZ (See § 373.5(c) (2).) 04190 Other grain sorghum, un- 208 YZ milled. (See § 373.5(c)(2).) 04590 Other seed cereal grains, 208 YZ n.e.c. (See § 373.5(c)(2).) 04590 Other cereal grains, Un- 208 YZ milled, n.e.c. (See § 373.5(c) (2).) 046 Wheat flour, meal, and groats - 208 YZ MISCELLANEOUS FOOD PREPARATIONS 09999 Food, donated for relief or charity by individuals or private agencies, n.e.c. SECTION 2-CRUDE MATE- RIALS, INEDIBLE, EX- CEPT FUELS OIL SEEDS, OIL NUTS, AND OIL KERNELS, AND FLOUR AND MEAL OF OIL SEEDS, NUTS, AND KERNELS 22105 Other oil seeds, oil nuts, and oil kernels. [Report peanuts, green, in No. 22110, soybeans in No. 22140, flaxseed in No. 22150, cottonseed in No. 22160.] CRUDE RUBBER, INcLUDING SYN- THETIC AND RECLAIMED RUBBER 23120 Synthetic rubber, as follows: (a) ethylenepropylene terpoly- mer, (b) cia-types (for example, cis-polyisoprene and cis-polybu- tadiene), (c) copolymers of methyl vinylpyridine and butadiene, (d) silicone rubber, and (e) other al- kyl polysulfide rubbers. [Report fluorinated silicone rubber in No. 58110.] Lb Bu Bu Bu.2 Bu Bu Bu Bu Bu Bu Bu Lb Lb Cwt B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B B (3) 208 SYZ Export controls applicable to each commodity under this classification are those which apply to the commodity when exported commer- cially under its individual Export Control Commodity number. 500 B Lb 228 SWXYZ ItO B See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0088" 520 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED EASTERN ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STAT EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued ES TO Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Unit Validated Proc- license essing required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions No. country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 2-CRUDE MATE- RIALS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FUELS-Continued CRUDE RUBBER, INCLUDING SYN- THETIC AND RECLAIMED RUBBER -Continued 23120 Other synthetic rubber and Lb.t 228 SXYZ 100 B rubber substitutes, n.e.c., exclud- ing compound, semiprocessed, and manufactures. 23130 Reclaimed rubber, natural Lb 228 SYZ and synthetic. 23140 Waste and scrap of unhard- Lb 228 SYZ ened rubber, natural and syn- thetic. PULP AND WASTE PAPER 25150 Cotton pulp S. ton 208 SYZ 500 B TEXTILE FIBERS, NOT MANUFAC- TURED INTO YARN, THREAD, OR FABRICS, AND THEIR WASTE [Report glass fiber yarn, roving, and strand in No. 65180.] 26700 Used, obsolete, and reject Lb 202 STVWXYZ 500 materials bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. CRUDE FERTILIZERS AND CRUDE MINERALS, EXCLUDING COAL, PE- TROLEUM, AND PRECIOUS STONES 27410 Sulfur. [Report sublimed, L. ------- 248 SXYZ 500 100 B precipitated or colloidal sulfur in No. 51329.] 27511 Crushing bort, except dust Carat 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B and powder. 27515 Diamonds, industrial. [Re- Carat 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B port synthetic diamonds in No. 27521.] 27521 Diamond dust and powder, Carat 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B natural or synthetic. 27521 Dust and powder of other Carat 218 SXYZ 500 100 B natural or synthetic precious or semi-precious stones. 27622 Natural graphite S ton 248 SYZ 500 B 27623 Dolomite, dead burned S. ton 248 SXYZ 500 100 B 27624 Magnesium oxide, purity 97 Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 percent or higher, except precipi- tated. 27655 Natural quartz. [Report S. ton 248 SXYZ 500 100 B pietzo electric quartz in No. 66700.] 27660 Mill slag S. ton 248 SWXYZ 500 100 B 27698 Natural borates and other Lb 248 SWXYZ 500 100 B boron materials (for example, cole- manite, pandermite, kermite, priceite, and ulexite). (Specify by name.) 27698 Lithium ores and concen- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 25 500 25 E-7 trates (for example, amblygonite, lepidolite and petalite). 27698 Nonmetallic minerals, as 248 SYZ 500 B follows: celestite; gallium sesqui- oxide; lutetium oxide; strontium sulfate; cerium ores (for example, bastnasite and cerite); and other rare earth (for example, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, praseo- dymium, and samarium). See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0089" SECTION 2-CRUDE MATE- RIALS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FUELS-Continued METALLIFEROUS ORES AND METAL SCRAP 28200 Alloy steel scrap containing any of the following: (a) 5 percent or more nickel by weight, (b) 5 percent or more cobalt by weight, or (c) 1 percent or more tungsten by weight. (See §~ 373.18(a) and 399.2, Interpretations 10 and 12.) 28200 Other iron and steel scrap. (See § 379.8(b) (2).) 28311 Copper ores and concen- trates. (See § 373.20(a).) 28312 Copper matte. (See § 373.20 (a).) [Report blister copper and other unrefined copper in No. 68211.] 28392 Tungsten ores and concen- trates. 28393 Tantalum ores and concen- trates. 28393 Molybdenum ores and con- centrates (See § 373.21.) 28393 Vanadium ores and concen- trates, including vanadium pent- oxide, vanadic acid, vanadium oxide and vanadates. 28393 Titanium or zirconium ores and concentrates. 28398 Niobium (columbium) ores and concentrates. 28398 Cobalt or nickel ores and concentrates. 28398 Quicksilver or mercury ores and concentrates. 28398 Rhenium concentrates (lasts) - Lb 28398 Other ores and concentrates Lb of nonferrous base metals, n.e.c. 28401 Tantalum bearing slag Lb 28401 Niobium (columbium) bear- Lb ing slag. 28401 Copper bearing ash and resi- Lb dues. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.20(b).) 28401 Nickel bearing residues and dross. (See § 373.18(a).) 28401 Vanadium bearing ash and residues. 28401 Other ash and residues bear- ing nonferrous metals, n.e.c. 28402 Copper or copper-base alloy waste and scrap. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See §~ 373.20(b) and 379.8(b)(2).) 28403 Nickel alloy waste and scrap containing 50 percent or more copper, irrespective of nickel con- tent. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.20(b).) 28403 Other nickel or nickel alloy waste and scrap. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) (See §[ 373.18(a) and 399.2, Inter- pretations 10 and 12.) 28404 Aluminum alloy scrap hav- ing (a) an average copper content of 1 percent or more irrespective of other elements, or (b) an average copper coistent of less than 1 per- cent and (i) a zinc content of 4 percent or more, (ii) a silicon con- tent of 3.5 percent or more, or (iii) a magnesium content of 9.5 per- cent or more. 521 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- coni- Unit easing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* S. ton 262 STVWXYZ S. ton 268 Cnt. lb. -- 272 Cnt. lb. - - 272 SWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SYz STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SXYz Lb 268 Lb 262 Cut. lb_~_~ 262 Cnt.lb_...._ 268 Lb Lb Lb Lb 100 500 100 500 100 B FG FG 500 B 100 500 100 500 1,000 1,000 E-7 500 100 B 500 B 100 500 100 500 100 B 100 500 100 E-7 500 500 B 100 500 100 100 500 100 100 100 100 FG 100 500 100 500 100 B PlO B 100 100 100 FG 100 100 100 100 500 100 500 100 B 268 SYZ 262 STVWXYZ 268 SWXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 268 SYZ 262 STVWXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 272 STVWXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 268 SXYZ 268 SYZ 272 STVWXYZ Lb Lb Lb Lb Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 262 STVW'XYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0090" SECTION 2-CRUDE MATE- RIALS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FUELS-Continued METALLIFEROUS ORES AND MEAT SCRAP 4-Continued 28500 Platinum and platinum Cnt. troy 268 SYZ group ores, concentrates, and oz. waste and sweepings, including platinum group materials con- tained in iron and steel scrap. CRUDE ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE MATERIALS, N.E.C. 29220 Organic flocculating agents 248 SWXYZ including, but not limited to, Arguard®, Guartec®, Faquar gum®, and Mannagal®. 29220 Burgundy pitch 248 SYZ 29250 Other forage sorghum seed - - Lb 208 SYZ 29280 Cinchona bark; pyrethrum Lb 248 SYZ (insect flowers); and rotenone- bearing roots, crude, ground, or powdered (for example, bar- basco root, cube root, derris root, and tuba root). SECTION 3-MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS, AND RE- LATED MATERIALS COAL, COEE, AND BRIQUETS 32180 Gilsocarbon coke or other S. ton 258 SYZ coke derived from gilsonite. PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 331 Crude petroleum, including Bbl.~ 258 SWXYZ shale oil; and petroleum partly refined for further refining, in- cluding topped crudes. 33210 Triisobutylene Bbl.i 258 SYZ 33210 Other gasoline blending Bbl.~ 258 SWXYZ agents, hydrocarbon compounds only, n.e.c.; and gasoline, exclud- ing jet fuel. [Report jet fuel in No. 33220.1 33220 Other jet fuels; and kerosene Bbl.~ 33230 Distillate fuel oils Bbl.~ 33240 Residual fuel oils Bbl.~ 33250 Lubricants which are or Bbl.~ which contain as the principal ingredient petroleum (mineral) oils and have (a) a pour point of minus 30° F. (minus 34° C.) or lower, and (b) are thermally stable at plus 700° F. (plus 371° C.), but have a viscosity index (VI) of less than 75*6 33250 Cylinder bright stock, in- cluding bright stock and indus- trial lubricating oils which are predominantly bright stock and have a Saybolt Universal vis- cosity at 210° F. (08.8° C.) of 95 seconds or more. 33250 Other lubricating oils con- taining more than 20 percent by weight of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers.7 33250 Other halogenated silicone fluids. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 522 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control conamoclity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups° Special provi- sions list' country groups shown below° S T V X 500 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 B 500 B 500 B 100 B B 100 B 258 SWXYZ 100 B 258 SWXYZ 100 B 258 SWXYZ 100 B 252 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-4 Bbl.I 252 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 Bbl.~ 252 STVWXYZ 500 250 E-13 Bbl.i 252 STVWXYZ 500 250 E-14 PAGENO="0091" 523 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits Special for shipments to provi- country groups* sions list* S P V X SECTION 3-MINERAL FUELS, LUBRICANTS, AND RE- LATED MATERIALS-Con. PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRoDUCTs-Continued 33250 Other petroleum based and BbI.~ 258 SWXYZ 100 B other ester type synthetic avia- tion engine lubricating oil. 33250 Other synthetic aviation Bbl.i 258 SXYZ 100 B engine lubricating oil. 33250 Molybdenum lubricants con- Lb 252 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-13 taming 80 percent or more of molybdenum disulphide. 33250 Other lubricating oils and Bbl.i - 258 SWXYZ 100 B greases. 33291 Hydraulic or automatic Bbl.I 252 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-4 transmission fluids, petroleum based, having all of the following characteristics: (a) kinematic vis- cosity of 4.6 centistokes or greater at 210° F. (98.8° C.); (b) pour point of minus 30° F. (minus 34° C.) or lower; and (c) viscosity index (VI) of 130 or higher. [Re- port hydraulic fluids containing less than 70 percent by weight of petroleum or shale oil in No. 59999.] 33291 Hydraulic fluids, petroleum Bbl.i 252 STVWXYZ 500 230 E-4 based, which are or which contain as the principal ingredient petro- leum (mineral) oils which have: (a) a pour point of minus 30° F. (minus 34° C.) or lower, and (b) are thermally stable at plus 700° F. (plus 371° C.), but have a viscosity index (VI) of less than 75~6 33291 Nonlubricating and nonfuel petroleum oils, the following only: hexanes; hexenes; methyl pen- Bbl.~ 258 SWXYZ 100 B tanes; normal heptane; normal hexane; normal pentane; octanes (octylenes); pentanes; pentenes; insulating or transformer oils, ex- cept polybutene; quenching and cutting oils, standard reference fuels; and white mineral oils in containers of 42 gallon capacity or over. 33294 Petroleum coke S. ton 258 SX'~Z 100 B SECTION 4-ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS, Ex- CEPT HYDROGENATED 42270 Other vegetable oils, n.e.c., LI) 208 YZ including tung oil. FATTY ACIDS, WAXES, AND SPE- CIALLY TREATED FATS AND OILS, EXCLUDING PETROLEUM PROD- UCTS 43110 Oils, boiled, oxidized, do- Lb 248 YE hydrated, blown or polymerized. 43120 Other hydrogenated fats and LI) 248 IZ oils, n.e.c. (includes unmixed and those that have not been further prepared for food purposes). [Re- port margarine, lard, lard sub- stitutes and similar prepared edi- ble shortenings in No. 091.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0092" 524 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GL V dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions list* country groups shown below* S T V X SECTION 4-ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS-Continued ANIMAL AND VEGETABLE OILS AND FATS, N.E.C., FOR RELIEF OR CHARITY 43150 Animal and vegetable oils Li) Export controls applicable to each commodity under this and fats, n.e.c., donated for relief classification are those which apply to the commodity or charity by individuals or psi- when exported commercially under its individual Ex- vats agencies. port Control Commodity number. SECTION 5-CHEMICALS CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS 51202 2-di-cyclohexyl carbodihnide Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 51202 Fluoro-alcohol esters; and Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-14 perfluoro-alkyl ethers. 51202 Di-o-tolyl carbodiimide Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 51202 Methyl benzylate Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 51202 Ortho chioro benzaldehyde - - Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 51202 Piperidine carboxyl acid Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 51202 Polyphenyl ethers contain- Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 250 ing more than three phenyl groups. 51202 3-quinuclidinone; and 3- Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 quinuclidinol. 51202 Chiorendic acid; and chlo- Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 rendic anhydride. 51202 Coal tar and other cyclic Lb.IO 228 SWXYZ 100 B chemical intermediates, the follow- ing only: dinitrotoluene solids and oils; diphenylam.ine; ethylbenzene; N-methylaniline (monomethylan- time); pyromellitic acid and dian- hydrides; toluene; and trimellitic acid and anhydrides. 51202 Other cyclic chemical inter- Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B mediates, n.e.c.5 51203 Beta - diethylaminoethyldi- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 25 500 25 phenyipropylacetate hydrochlo- ride. 51203 Synthetic organic medicinal Lb Export controls applicable to these commodities arc chemicals, in bulk, for which ill- those which apply to the industrial grades. dustrial grades are included under other Export Control Commodity Numbers. 51203 Other synthetic organic me- Li) 248 XYZ 100 B dicinal chemicals in bulk." (Spe- cify by chemical name.) [Report synthetic organic medicinal chern- ical mixtures or compounds, in bulk, in No. 54170.] 51204 Antiozonants derived from Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B paraphenylinediamine. 51204 Other rubber compounding Lb 248 SYZ B chemicals, n.e.c. 51205 Esters of trimethylol propaile Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-14 or trimethylol ethane or pentaery- thritol with saturated monobasic acids containing more than six carbon atoms, including but not limited to trimethylolpropane tn- pelargonate. 51205 Esters of saturated aliphatic Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 L-14 monohydric alcohols containing more than six carbon atoms with adipic or azelaic or sebacic acids, in- eluding but not limited to nonyl sebacates, nonyl azelates, nonyl adipates, octyl sebacates, octyl azelates, and octyl adipates. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0093" 525 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Proc- license for shipments to provi- Unit essing required for country groups* sions No. country groups list~ shown below* S T V X STVWXYZ SxYz SxYz SwxYz STVWXYZ SwxYz SxYz SxYz STVWXYZ Lb 228 SWXYZ 500 250 E-14 100 B 500 100 B 100B 500 250 E-14 100 B 100 B 100B 500 100 E-14 500 250 E-14 500 SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS `-Continued ORGANIC CHEMICALS-continued 51205 Esters of dibasic saturated Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B aliphatic acids combined with polyglycols, where one or both of the two constituents contain six or more carbon atoms; and other esters of saturated mouohydric alcohols with dibasic saturated aliphatic acids where both of the two constituents contain six or more carbon atoms. 51205 Polyphenyl ethers contain- Lb 222 ing more than three phenyl groups. 51205 Other plasticizers, n.e.c Lb 228 51206 Other herbicides; fungicides; Lb 248 dichlorodipheuyl trichioroethane (LIDT); polychior insecticides; or- ganic phosphate insecticides cop- per (cupric) acetoarsenite (paris green); suiphoxide N-octyl sul- phoxide of isosafrole; fumigants (soil, grain, and industrial) 12 51206 Other pesticides and syn- Lb 248 SYZ~ 500 B thetic organic agricultural chem- icals, except formulations or prep- arations or pesticidal chemicals put up for retail sale." 51207 Chemicals as anti-knock Lb 248 agents. 51208 Polyphenyl ethers contain- Lb 222 ing snore than three phenyl groups. 51208 Diorgano siloxanes capable Lb 228 of being polymerized to rubbery products. 51208 Alpha-trioxymethylene (tn- Lb 248 oxano). 51208 Other cyclic chemical prod- Lb 228 ucts, n.e.c.'2 51209 Monochlorodifluoroethane Lb 222 (e.g., Fluorocarbon 142B®); and monochlorodifluoromethane (e.g., Freon-22®). (Specify by name.) 51209 Fluoro-alcohol esters; and Lb 222 STVWXYZ perfluoro-alkyl ethers. 51209 Trichioroethylene specially Lb 242 STVWXYZ purified and/or neutrally stabil- ized for precision type metal clean- ing or degreasing 51209 Bromomonochlorollfluoro- 100 B methane (e.g., Freon 12B1®); di- bromodifluoromethane (e.g., Fre- on-12B2®); dibromomonochioro- trifluoroethane (e.g., Freon- 113B2®); difluoroethane (e.g., Fluorocarbon-152A®); bromotri- fluoromethano (e.g., Freon-13B &; Freon-13B 1®); chioropentafluor- ethane (e.g., Freon-us®); chloro- trifluoromethane (e.g., Freon 13®); octafluorocyclobutane (e.g., Freon C318®); tetrachlorodifluro- ethano (e.g., Freou-112®); and tetrafluoromethane (e.g., Freon- 14®). 51209 Other organo-fluorine com- Lb 228 SXYZ 100 B pounds, n.e.c. 51209 Organic flocculating agents... Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B 51209 2-eyanoacetamide Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 51209 Diethylaminoethanol Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0094" SECTION 5-CHEMICALS---Con. CsIEancAL ELEMENTS AND CoMPoUNDs 9-Continued ORGANIC C~MIcALS-cOfltinued 51209 Diethylene triamine of a Lb 222 purity less than 96 percent. 51209 Di-ethyl methyl phosphonite Lb 222 51209 Di-isopropyl amino ethyl Lb 222 chloride hydrochloride. 51209 Di-isopropyl carbodiimide - - Lb 222 51209 2-di-isopropyl aminoethanol - Lb 222 51209 Di-methyl hydrogen phos- Lb 222 phite. 51209 Esters of trimethylol pro- Lb 222 pane or trimethylol ethane or pentaerythritol with saturated monobasic acids containing more than six carbon atoms, including but not limited to trimethylol- propane tripelargonate. 51209 Esters of saturated aliphatic monohydric alcohols containing more than six carbon atoms with adipic or azelaic or sebacic acids, including but not limited to nonyl sebacates, nonyl azelates, nonyl adipates, octyl sebacates, octyl azelates, and octyl adipates. 51209 Esters of dibasic saturated aliphatic acids combined with polyglycols, where one or both of the two constituents contain six or more carbon atoms; and other esters of saturated monohydric alcohols with dibasic saturated aliphatic acids where both of the two constituents contain six or more carbon atoms. 51209 Lysergic acid di ethyl amine_ Lb 51209 Malononitrile Lb 51209 Methyl dichlor phosphine_.... - Lb 51209 Methyl isonicotenate Lb 51209 Methyl phosphonyl dichlo- Lb ride. 51209 N. N-diethyl ethylene dia- Lb mine (diethylamino ethylamine). 51209 Boric acid esters Lb 51209 Carbonyl chloride (phos- Lb gene); and trichloromethyl chlo- roformate (diphosgene). 51209 Lithium salts of organic Lb 222 compounds. 51209 Yttrium salts of organic Lb 222 compounds. 51209 Organic chemicals, the follow- Lb 228 ing only: amyl ziran; barium styphnate; cobalt salts of organic compounds (for example, cobalt acetate); dibutyl tin compounds; diorgano siloxanes capable of being polymerized to rubbery products; isopropyl ether; penta- erythritol; 2,4,4, trimethylpen- tene; thiodiglycol; triethyl alu- minum; trimethyl aluminum; and other organic compounds, n.e.c., useable as catalysts in petroleum and chemical process- ing operations. 51209 Other miscellaneous indus- trial and other organic chemicals, including intermediates, n.e.c.'3 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 526 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 196S-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- coin- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-14 500 25~. -- 500 25 500 100 500 100 500 25 500 100 E-14 500 100 E-14 100 B Lb 228 SWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 242 STVWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 500 500 1, 000 500 500 100 25 25 25 100 1,000 500 E-13 500 E-13 STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SWXYZ 500 25 E-13 500 25 E-13 100 B 100 B Lb.'~ 228 SXYZ PAGENO="0095" 527 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc- license for shipments to provi- control commodity No. and com- Unit essing required for country groups* sbus modity description No. country groups list* shown below6 S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS s-Continued INORGANIC CHEMICALS 51310 Industrial gases, including M Cu. ft_. - 228 SXYZ rare gases, except helium and mix- tures thereof.15 [Report net quan- tity in cubic feet of equivalent gas.] 51321 Chlorine ..~ - Lb 222 51325 Quicksilver or mercury Lb 262 51327 Carbon black, all forms; and Lb 248 carbon and other blacks of carbon. 51329 Silicon of a purity of 09.9 per- Lb 242 cent up to but not. including 99.09 percent. [Report silicon monocrys- talline and polycrystalline in No. 68950.] 51329 Yttrium metal and powders Lb 242 51329 Phosphorus, elemental Lb. 248 51329 Sulfur, sublimed, precipitat- Lb 248 ed, or colloidal. 51320 Other chemical elements, Lb 228 n.e.c.16 51338 Fluoroboric acid, all concen- Cnt. lb.~ 242 trations. 51338 Other boric acids.. Cnt. lb~. 248 51338 Hydrocyanic acid (hydrogen Lb 222 ~cyanide). 5 338 Other inorganic acids and ox- Lb 248 ygen compounds of non-metals or rnetalloids.15 51340 Phosphorus oxychloride; and phosphorus trichloride. 51340 Other halogen compounds and sulfur compounds of non- metals or metalloids.'3 51350 Cobalt oxiue; and cobalt hydroxide. 51350 Catalysts useable in petro- leum and chemical processing op- erations. 51350 Other oxides of zinc, titan!- Lb 248 UITI manganese, lead, or iron. 51364 Magnesium oxide, precipita- Lb 242 ted, purity 97 percent or higher. 51364 Catalysts useable in petro- Lb 228 leum and chemical processing op- erations. 51364 Other strontium, barium or magnesium oxides, hydroxides and peroxides. 51365 Alumina, all types, 99 per- cent purity and over. 51365 Aluminum oxide and hy- droxide catalysts useable in petro- leum and chemical processing op- erations. 51365 Other aluminum oxide and hydroxide. 51366 Aluminum oxide catalysts useable in petroleum and chemical processing operations. 51366 Other artificial corundum (fused aluminum oxide). 51367 Catalysts useable in petro- leum and chemical processing operations. 51367 Other chromium oxides, an- hydrides, and hydroxides. 51369 Other gallium oxides, hy- droxides, and peroxides. (Specify by name.) 100 B 500 500 E-7 500 100 E-7 - 100 B 500 500 STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SXYZ STVWXYZ ST\7WXYZ Sw-xYz SXYZ SYZ STVWTXYZ SWXYZ STVWXYZ SxYz Lb 248 SWXYZ Lb 248 SXYZ 500 100 B 100 B B 500 500 100 B 500 ItO E-7 100 B 100 B 100 B Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B SXYZ STVWXYZ SwxYz Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B 500 50 100 B 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ 100 500 E-la Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B Lb 268 SYZ Lb 228 swx~z Lb 268 SYZ Lb 228 SWXYZ B 100 B B 100 B Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B Lb 242 STVWXYZ 100 25 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0096" 528 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS s-Continued INORGANIC CHEMICALS-continued 51369 Germanium oxides, hydrox- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 ides, and peroxides, 99.99 percent or better purity. 51369 Hafnium oxides containing Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 15 percent or less hafnium by weight. (State hafnium content.) 51369 Hydrazine hydrate. 17 Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 51369 Lithium oxides and hy- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 25 droxides. [Report isotope enriched lithium in No. 51500.] 51369 Molybdenum oxide. (See § Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-13 373.36.) [Report natural molyb- denum oxide in No. 28393.] 51369 Other catalysts useable in Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B petroleum and chemical process- ing operations. 51369 Rhenium oxides and corn- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 pounds. 51369 Other oxides, hydroxides, Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 25 and peroxides of tantalum, nio- bium (columbium), or tantalum- niobium. 51369 Yttrium oxides, hydroxides, Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 25 and peroxides. (Specify by name.) 51369 Other zirconium oxide, pur- Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 25 ity 97 percent or higher, or stabi- lized with lime and/or magnesia. (State hafnium content.) 51369 Other inorganic bases and Lb 228 SXYZ 100 B metallic oxides, hydroxides, and peroxides, n.e.c. 17 51450 Aluminum compounds use- Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B able as catalysts for petroleum and chemical processing operations. 51450 Aluminum compounds, the Lb 248 SYZ following only: alum, crystallized; aluminum fluoride; aluminum nitrate; aluminum silicate; am- monia alum; potash alum; potass- sium alum; potassium aluminum sulfate; soda alum; and sodium aluminate. 51450 Other aluminum com- Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B pounds, n.e.c. 51460 Potassium fluoroborates; and Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-13 sodium fluoroborates. 51460 Other fluoroborates; borates Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B refined; sodium perchlorate; and potassium perchlorate. 51460 Molecular sieves, not loaded Lb 222 STV%SXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-13 (for example, crystalline sodium aluminosilicate). (Specify type and form, suco as powder or pel- lets.) [Report molecular sieves, loaded, in No. 59999.] 51460 Sodium aluminum sulfate~ - Lb 248 SYZ B 51460 Other sodium and potassium Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B compounds n.e.c.18 51470 Molybdenum disulfide, 86 Lb 262 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-13 percent content or higher. (See 1 373.36.) 51470 Molecular sieves, not loaded Lb 222 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-13 (for example, crystalline calcium aluminosilicate). (Specify type and form, such as powder or pel- lets.) [Report molecular sieves, loaded, in No. 59999.] See footnotes at end of table, p. GiL PAGENO="0097" 529 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups - llst* shown below* S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COM- POUNDS-Continued INORGANIC CHEMICALS-continued 51470 Boron trichloride and its Lb 222 ~ complexes. 51470 Ammonium fluoroborate Lb 242 51470 Other boron compounds and Lb 228 mixtures. 51470 Cyanogen chloride 51470 Other synthetic ferrites and Lb garnets, n.e.c. (Specify by name and form.) 51470 Hydrogen peroxide in con- Lb centrations of 66 percent up to but not including 80 percent. 51470 Hydrogen peroxide in con- Lb 248 SXYZ centrations over 5 percent up to but not including 66 percent. 51470 Hafnium compounds con- Lb taming 15 percent or less hafnium by weight. (Specify by name and state hafnium content.) 51470 Beryllium compounds, in- Lb 241 STVWXYZ eluding, but not limited to, beryl- lium nitrate, beryllium sulfate, beryllium carbonate, zinc beryl- hum silicate. (Specify by name.) 51470 Cobalt compounds, n.e.c. Lb 248 51470 Yttrium compounds. (Spec- Lb 242 ify by name.) 51470 Master alloys of copper con- Lb 272 taming 8 percent or more phos- phor. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) [Re- port master alloys of copper con- taining less than 8 percent phos- phor in No. 68213.J 51470 Other gallium compounds, n.e.c. (Specify by chemical name.) [Report gallium oxides, hydrox- ides and peroxides in No. 51369.] 51470 Germanium compounds, Lb 242 STVWXYZ 99.99 percent or better purity, n.e.c. [Report germanium oxides, hydroxides and peroxides in No. 51369.J 51470 Other lithium compounds, including catalysts. [Report lith- ium oxides, hydroxides and per- oxides in No. 51369, and isotope enriched compounds in No. 51500.] 51470 Other compounds, n.e.c., of tantalum, niobium (columbium) or tantalum-niobium. (Specify by name.) 51470 Silicon carbide, all types, 99 Lb 262 percent purity and over. 51470 Nickelsulfate. (See § 373.38.)_ Lb 262 51470 Nickel chloride; and tita- Lb - 248 nium trichloride. 51470 Other catalysts useable in Lb 228 petroleum and chemical process- ing operations. 51470 Calcium molybdates; and Lb 262 STVWXYZ molybdenum carbides. (See § 373.36.) 51470 Ammonium molybdate; Lb 262 STVWXYZ sodium molybdate; and potas- sium molybdate. (See § 373.36.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SWXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 248 SXYZ 500 100 E-13 500 500 E-l3 100B 500 500 E-13 100 B 242 STVWXYZ 500 100 B 242 STVWXYZ 500 E-l3 SwxYz STVWXYZ STVWXYZ Lb 242 STVWXYZ Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 AE-13 100 B 500 E-l3 100 100 FG 500 500 500 25 500 250 500 500 500 100 100 B 100 B 500 100 E-7 500 25 E-13 Lb 242 STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ SWXYZ SWXYZ 97-627-68-pt. 2-7 PAGENO="0098" SECTION 5-CHEMICALS--Con. CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND CoM- POUNDS-Continued INORGANIC cHEMIcALs-continued 51470 Other molybdenum salts Lb 268 SWXYZ and compounds; titanium car- bide; and titanium tetrachioride. 51470 Ammonium metavanadate Lb 268 SYZ silicon carbide less than 99 per- cent purity; and tungsten carbide powder. 51470 Rhenium compounds Lb 242 STVWXYZ 51470 Insecticides, fumigants, ro- Lb 248 SYZ denticides, and fungicides, in- organic; [RepOrt pesticidal chemi- cal formulations or preparations, and pesticidal chemicals put up for retail salem No. 59920.] 51470 Herbicides and defoliants, Lb 248 SXYZ inorganic.13 [Report pesticidal chemical formulations, prepara- tions, and pesticidal chemicals put up for retail sale in No. 59920.] 51470 Other inorganic chemicals, (20) 228 SXYZ n.e~c.'3 11 51480 Inorganic medicinal chemi- cals, n.e.c., in bulk, for which in- dustrial grades are included under other Export Control Commodity Numbers. 51480 Other inorganic medicinal Lb 248 SXYZ chemicals, n.e.c., in bulk.1s [Re- port inorganic medicinal chemical mixtures or compounds, in bulk, in No. 54170.] 51500 Radioisotopes, cyclotron- MC 248 SXYZ produced or naturally occurring, having an atomic number 3 through 83, and compounds and preparations thereof; and radium, radium salts and compounds. (Specify by name.)21 51500 Other radioisotopes, cyclo- tron-producedor naturally occur- ring, and compounds and prepara- tions thereof. (Specify by name.)2' 51500 Other deuterium and corn- pounds, mixtures, and solutions containing deuterium, including heavy water and heavy paraffin. (Specify by name.) 51500 Polonium metal MC 262 STVWXYZ 51500 Polonium-bearing salts and MC 242 STVWXYZ compounds. (Specify by name.) 51500 Radium metal and alloys MC 268 SYZ (radium content). 51500 Compounds enriched in lith- 242 STVWXYZ ium 7 isotopes. 51500 Other stable isotopes and 248 SXYZ their compounds.22 MINERAL TAR, TAR OILS, AND CRUDE CHEMICALS PROM COAL, PETROLEUM, AND NATURAL GAs 52140 Toluene, crude Gal 258 SWXYZ 52140 Other tar oils, chemicals, and Lb 258 SXYZ other products, crude, from coal, petroleum, and natural gas, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 530 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE. UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc- license for shipments to provi- control commodity No and com Unit essing required for country groups sions modity description No country groups list shown below* S T V X lOOB B 500 moo B 500 100 B 100 B Lb Export controls applicable to these commodities are those which apply to the industrial grades. 500 100 B 500 100 B MC 242 STVWXYZ 500 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 B, 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B PAGENO="0099" -B - 100 B - 100 B 531 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions list* country groups shown below* S P V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS--Con. DYEING, TANNING, AND COLORING MATERIALS, NATURAL AND SYN- THETIC 53101 Sulfur black Lb 248 SXYZ 53310 Phosphor compounds spe- Lb 242 STVWXYZ cially prepared for lasers, includ- ing but not limited to: neodym- ium-doped calcium tungstate; dysprosium-doped calcium fluo- ride; eu-trifluoroethenoylaceto- nate; or praseodymium-doped lanthanum trifluoride. 53310 Other coloring materials Lb 248 SXYZ (composites), n.e.c., including colors such as dispersed colors in plastics and rubber. 53332 Other enamels, varnishes, GaL.. 222 STVWXYZ and other finishes containing polyimides, polybenzirnidazoles, polyimidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, and polyparaxyly- enes. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) 53332 Enamels, varnishes, and Gal 222 STVWXYZ other finishes as follows: (a) par- tially made of polytetrafluoro- ethylene or polychlorotrifluoro- thylene, (b) wholly made of poly- vinyl fluoride, or (c) made of poly- imide-polyamide. (Specify by name.) 53332 Chlorendic alkyd resin Gal 222 STVWXYZ enamels, varnishes, and other finishes. 53332 Varnishes, paints, and re- Gal 248 SXYZ lated materials as follows: fluores- cent ready-mixed; antifouling types, including all those con- taining cuprous oxide; and those containing silicones. 53335 Pastes wholly made of poly- Lb 222 STVWXYZ vinyl fluoride. (Specify by name.) MEDICINAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS [Report bulk preparations of two or more substances, and all medicinals in dosage form or packed for retail sale, in No. 54170.1 54140 Vegetable alkaloids, their Lb 248 XYZ salts and other derivatives, bulk, the following only: ephetonin; ergometrine; ergonovine; eumy- drine; n-hexyl nicotinate; thea- mm; tueophylline; tubocurarene chloride; and narcotics." 54140 Other vegetable alkaloids, Lb 248 YZ their salts, and other derivatives, bulk. 54161 Other glycosides and their Lb 248 XYZ derivatives, bulk. 54163 Viruses for human, veteri- 248 XYZ nary, or laboratory use, except hog cholera virus and simultaneou8 virus. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 500 100 B ~- 500 100 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-3 500 .500 500 E-3 500 500 500 500 100 B 25 500 25 E-3 bOB PAGENO="0100" 532 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1908-ContInued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc- license for shipments to provi- control commodity No. and com- Unit essing required for country groups* sions modity description No. country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMIOALS-Con. MEDICINAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PRoDucTs-Continued 54170 Medicinal chemicals, bulk, 248 YZ the following only: acetanilid and hyocyamus compound; alumi- dyne granules; Amigen®; Apala- mine tablet granulation®; and delcos. 54170 Narcotics, dosage or packed 248 XYZ 100 B for retail sale.11 54170 Alkaloids of cinchona bark, 248 YZ B their salts, derivatives and prepa- rations, dosage or packed for retail sale, except parenteral solutions or ampoules. 54180 Medicinal and pharmaceu- Export controls applicable to each commodity under this classifica- tical products donated for relief or tion are those which apply to the commodity when exported corn- charity by individuals or private mercially under its individual Export Control Commodity agencies. (Specify by name.) Number. 54199 First aid boxes and kits, 248 WXYZ 100 B milltary. 54199 Cobalt dental alloys 268 WXYZ 100 B ESSENTIAL OILS AND PERFUME MA- TERALS; TOILET, POLISHING, AND CLEANSING PREPARATIONS 55420 Other surface-active agents~_ Lb 248 SXYZ 500 100 B FERTILIZERS, MANUFACTURED 56100 Other chemical fertilizers 18 - S. ton 248 SXYZ 500 100 B ExPLOSIVEs AND PYROTECHNIC PRODUCTS 23 57112 Oil well bullets; and jet Lb 402 SVWXYZ 500 E-12 perforators.24 57112 Prepared explosives and Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-l4 priming compositions containing either or both of the following chemicals: barium styphnate, or lead dinitroreSorcinate. ~7112 Other explosives andblasting Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B agents.23 1i7121 Mining, blasting and safety Lin. ft_~ 248 SXYZ 100 B fuses. ~7122 Electric squibs; Nos. 6 and 8 M 248 SXYZ 100 B blasting caps, electric and non- electric; delay electric blasting caps, including Nos. 6 and 8 and millisecond; and seismograph elec- tric blasting caps, including SSS, Static-Master, Vibrocap SR, and SEISMO SRII :57140 Shotgun shells, and parts (26) 218 SXYZ and (27) 100 B Rep. So. Africa 57140 Cartridges, sporting rifle (28) - 218 SXYZ 100 B type, for powder-actuated indus- trial devices; and other hunting and sporting ammunition, n.e.c., except hunting and sporting rifle cartridges.18 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0101" 533 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups - list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. PLASTIC MATERIALS, REGENERATED CELLULOSE, AND ARTIFICIAL RESINS 58110 Untensilized and unmetal- Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 lized polyester film with a thick- ness 0.00035 inch (0.009 mm) up to and including 0.0007 inch (0.018 mm). 58110 Polyester film as follows: (a) Lb 228 SWXYZ tensilized film, with thickness greater than 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) up to and including 0.0015 inch (0.038 mm.), and (b) Un- tensilized film with thickness greater then 0.0007 inch (0.018 mm.) up to and including 0.0015 inch (0.038 mm.). 58110 Polyimide-polyamide resins, Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 unfinished or semifinished. 58110 Resin (plastic) composites, Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 unfinished or semifinished (in- cluding molding compounds, lam- inates and molded shapes), con- taining silica, quartz, carbon or graphite fibers in any form.13 58110 Chlorendic alkyd resins Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 58110 Ion exchange membranes; Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B and ion exchange liquids. 58110 Other ion exchange resins. Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B [Report styrene ion exchange res- ins and other polymerization and copolymerization products in No. 58120.] 58110 Other silicone rubbers and Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B pounds. 58110 Epoxy resins Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B 58110 Acetal resins Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B 58110 Other condensation, poly- Lb 228 SXYZ 100 B condensation, and polyaddition products, unfinished or semifin- ished. 18120 Other fluorocarbon polymer Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-3 and copolymer products as fol- lows: (a) polyvinyl fluoride, un- finished and semifinished, (b) molding compositions containing more than 20 percent by weight of fluorocarbon polymers or copoly- mers, or (c) laminates partially made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, including molded, decorative, or laminated with other materials or metals. (Speci- fy by name.) (See § 399.2, Inter- pretation 22.) 58120 Polyimide-polyamide resins, Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 unfinished and semifinished. 58120 Pipe and tubing lined with, Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-3 or coveredwith other fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 58120 Resin (plastic) composites, Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 unfinished or semifinished (in- cluding molding compounds, lam- inates, and molded shapes), con- taining silica, quartz, carbon, or graphite fibers in any form.14 58120 Irradiated polyolefin film, Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B sheeting, and laminates. 58120 Polyethylene fflm,rsheeting, Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B or laminates containing any boron. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0102" 534 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated LV dollar value limits Special license required for country groups shown below* for shipments to provi- country groups* sions list* S T V X SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. PLASTIC MATERIALS, REGENERAT- ED CELLULOSE, AND ARTSFICIAL RESINS-Continued 58120 Methyl methacrylate, clear, Lb 248 SWXYZ - 100 B film, sheeting, or laminates, 3/s Inch or more in thickness. 58120 Organic fiocculating agents Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B (for example, Aerofioc®, Bene- fite®, Cyanamer 370®, Dearfioc, Good-rite® K-720 and K-720S, Nalco®, Nalcolyte®, Polyfioc®, Polyox®, Primafioc®, Separan®, and Superfioc®). 58120 Ion exchange membranes; Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B and ion exchange liquids. 58120 Other ion exchange resins~ - - Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B 58120 Other polymerization and Lb 228 SXYZ 100 B copolymerization products, un- finished or semifinished. [Report condensatiOn, polycondensation, and polyaddition products in No. 58110.] 58132 Cellulose acetate film suit- Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B able for dielectric use, 0.0015 inch (0.038 mm.) or less in thickness. 58199 Other artificial resins and Lb 228 SXYZ 100 B plastic materials, including nat- ural high polymers, n.e.c.21 CHEMICAL MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS, N. E. C. Insecticides, fungicides, disin- fectants and similar - preparations which are (a) separate chemically defined products put up in forms or packings for retail sale (bulk forms are covered elsewhere in the Com- modity Control List) or (b) prep- arations (mixtures) whether put up up in bulk or for retail sale. 59920 Weed killers, consisting pri- Lb 248 SWXYZ 500 100 B manly of bDron compounds (for example, borates, borax). 59920 Nicotine sulfate, 40 percent Lb 248 SYZ 500 B basis; copper sulfate; lead arse- nate; calcium arsenate; paradi- chlorobenzene; benzene hexa- chloride, technical and formu- lations; fumigants, insecticides, pesticides, disinfectants, deodor- ants, and germicides, except the following products or preparations: Acrylon fumigant®; azobenzene fumigating powder; Blacklsaf mos- quitofumer®; bug bombs (aerosol dispensers) containing over 16 ounces of insecticide; cyanide, crude; cyanogas; PD (dichloropropene- dichioropropane mixture); Dow- fusne W-85®;fumo gas; Hyamine® 1O-X; methyl bromide; moth balls; naphthalene balls and flakes in packages exceeding 5 pounds; ne- matacides; nicotine fumigating powders; and soilfumigants.3° 59920 Other insecticides, fungi- ~ 284 SXYZ 500 100 B cides, disinfectants, and similar products.2° See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0103" 535 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an moclity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X Special provi- sions list* SECTION 5-CHEMICALS--Con. CHEMICAL MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS, N.E.C-Continued 59958 Other adhesives or cements Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-3 containing polyimides, polyben- zimidazoles, polimidazopyr- rolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, or polyimide- polyamide, or wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) 59958 Other glues and adhesives; Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B and peptones. 59971 Polyethylene wax containing Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B boron. 59971 Other artificial waxes and Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B prepared waxes, not emulsified or containing solvents. 59972 Carbon or graphite fibers in Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 any form (including chopped or macorated) whether or not coated or impregnated; and products thereof.13 59972 Other pyrolytic graphite and Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-8 products, n.e.c. 59972 Artificial non-pyrolytic Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-8 graphite and products, having an apparentrelative density between 1.90 and 1.95 when compared to water at 60~ F. (15.5~ C.), in such forms as will not pass through a two-inch square hole. 59972 Other artificial graphite Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-8 products in block, brick, plate, or rod form, smallest dimension 2 inches or over. (Specify by name, size and boron content in parts per million.) 59972 Other artificial and colloidal Lb 218 SYZ graphite. 59975 Prepared anti-knock corn- 248 SWXYZ 100 B pounds; and prepared additives for lubricating oils. (Specify by name.) 59975 Prepared additives for fuel 248 SXYZ 100 B oils and petroleum distillates. 59976 Prepared rubber accelerators Lb 248 SYZ B 59992 Activated carbon useable as Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B catalysts in petroleum and chem- ical processing operations. 59992 Other activated carbon and Lb 248 SXYZ 100 B activated charcoal; and bleaching earth, acid activated. 59999 Molecular sieves, loaded (for Lb 222 STVWXYZ 1,000 1, 000 E-l3 example, crystalline calcium alu- minosilicate or crystalline sodium aluminosilicate). (Specify type and form, such as powder or pellets, and loading material.) [Report molecular sieves, not loaded, In No. 51460 or 51470.] 59999 Nickel compound catalysts Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B and other catalysts useable in petroleum and chemical process- ing operations. See footnotes at end oft able, p. 611. PAGENO="0104" SECTION 5-CHEMICALS-Con. CHEMICAL MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS, N.E.C.-Continued 59999 Other compound catalysts Lb not useable in petroleum or chem- ical processing operations. 59999 Hydraulic fluids which are Bbl.~ 252 or which contain as the principal ingredients petroleum (mineral) oils which have: (a) a pour point of minus 30~ F. (minus 34~ C.) or lower, and (b) are thermally stable at plus 700~ F. (plus 371~ C.), but have a viscosity index (VI) of less than 75~6 59999 Other hydraulic fluids, oils, BbL~ 258 SWXYZ and lubricants, petroleum or synthetic based. [Report hy- draulic fluids containing 70 per- cent or more by weight of petro- leum or shale oil in No. 33291.] 59999 Other chemical products or (3 2) 248 SXYZ preparations, except alkylben- zens, dodecylbenzene, and other detergent alkylates, n.e.c.13 SECTION 6-MANTJFAC- TURED GOODS CLASSI- FIED CHIEFLY BY MA- TERIAL RUBBER MANUFACTURES, N.E.C. 62101 Masterbatches, cis-rubber types, in plates, sheets, or strips, including those only surface- worked and/or cut into rectangu- lar shapes. 62101 Other unvulcanized rubber Lb 228 SXYZ plates, sheets, or strips, including those only surface-worked and/or cut into rectangular shapes. 62102 Masterbatches, cis-rubber Lb 228 SWXYZ types, n.e.c. 62102 Sponge rubber, chemically Lb 228 SYZ blown or foam. 62102 Other unvulcanized natural Lb 228 SXYZ or synthetic rubber, n.e.c. 62105 Rubber hose and tubing Lb 222 STVWXYZ lines with or covered with other fluorocarbon polymers or copoly- mers.33 62910 Other aircraft tires 34 No 62910 Aircraft inner tubes 3~ No 62910 Farm tractor and implement No tires; and solid and cushion tires, truck and industiral. 62910 Other tires, as follows: (a) No 218 SWXYZ of 10 ply rating or over, in sizes 9:00 or over, and (b) tires with a non-directional tread design. 62910 Other vehicle pneumatic No 218 SXYZ tires and inner tubes. 62988 Packing materials and other Lb 222 STVWXYZ articles, n.e.c., wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. 62988 Other sponge rubber and Li) 218 SYZ foam rubber goods. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 536 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED EASTERN ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued TO Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and corn- modity description * Unit * Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* - S T V X Special provi- sions list* 228 SXYZ 100 B STVWXYZ 500 25 E-4 100 B 100 B Lb 228 SWXYZ 100 B 100 B 100 B B 100 B 500 50 E-1 212 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-2 212 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-2 218SYZ B 100 B 100 B 500 500 PAGENO="0105" SECTION 6-MANUFACTTJR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued PAPER, PAPERBOARD, AND MANU- FACTURES THEREOF 64130 Kraft condenser tissue or capacitor paper, and other di- electric paper. 64180 Condenser tissue or capacitor paper, and other dielectric paper, n.e.c. 64298 Pressure sensitive paper or paperboard tape coated or fin- pregnated with fluorocarbon poly- mers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 64298 Processed paper for dielectric use. TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE- UP ARTICLES AND RELATED PRODUCTS 65130 Cotton tire cord and tire cord fabric. 65166 Tire cord and tire cord fab- ric of nonceilulosic manmade fl- ber. 65176 Thread and yarns of rayon or acetate filament; and tire cord and tire cord fabric of cellulosie man- made fiber. 65180 Other continuous yarns and rovings made of glass fibers, hav- ing a modulus of elasticity of 10.5 times 106 psi or greater, or having a tensile strength to density ratio (figure or merit) of 300,000 psi or greater.3I 65180 Yarn, roving, and strand made from silica or quartz fibers, regardless jof filament length, di- ameter, or strength, whether or not coated or impregnated. 65180 Fiber glass mop yarn 65180 Other glass fiber yarn, rov- ing, and strand. 65222 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of Amer- ica. 65229 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65230 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65301 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65310 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65310 Parachute cloth, wholly or in chief weight silk. 65321 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 53.7 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups- shown below* GLV dollar value limits Special for shipments to provi- country groups* lions list* P V X S Lb 218 SXYZ Lb Lb 218 SXYZ 222 STVWXYZ 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-3 500 100 B 500 B 500 B 500 B 218 SXYZ Lb 218 SYZ Lb 218 SYZ Lb 218 SYZ Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 Lb 222 STVWXYZ Lb Lb Sq. yd~ 228 SXYZ 228 SYZ 212 STVWXYZ 500 25 500 100 B 500 B 500 Sq. yth - - - 212 STVWXYZ 500 Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 Sq. yd - - - 212 STVWXYZ 500 Sq. yd - - - 212 STVWXYZ 500 Sq. yd - - - 218 SXYZ 500 100 B Sq. yd - - - 212 STVWXYZ 500 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0106" 500 500 500 _ E-3 500- 100 B 500 500 500 100EB 500 100 B 500 500 100 B 538 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description ~ export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* STVWXYZ 500 500 500 500 E-3 500 100 B 500 100 B Sq. yd.~° - 212 STVWXYZ 500 SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE- Us' ARTICLES AND RELATED PRoDucTs-Continued 65351 Used or reject fabric bearing Sq. yd.36 - 212 the design of any version of the flag of the* United States of America. 65351 Broad woven fabrics coated Sq. yd.~6 - 222 STVWXYZ or Impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 65351 Woven tire fabrics, except tire Sq. yd.I6_ 218 SXYZ cord fabric, and fuel-cell fabrics, wholly or inchief weight noncellu- losic man-made fibers. 65351 Parachute fabric, broad wov- Sq. yd.38 - 218 SWXYZ en, wholly or in chief weight non- cellulosic filament yarns and monofilaments. 65352 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65352 Broad woven fabrics coated Sq. yd.I0 - 222 STVWXYZ or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 65352 Parachute fabric, broad Sq. yd.16 - 218 SWXYZ woven, wholly or in chief weight noncellulosic spun yarns. 65354 Used or reject fabric bearing Lb 212 STVWXYZ the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65361 Used or reject fabric bearing Sq. yd.16 - 212 STVWXYZ the design of any versionof the flag of the United States of America. 65361 Parachute cloth of broad Sq. ycl.36 - 218 SWXYZ woven fabrics, wholly or in chief weight cellulosic filament yarns. 65361 Woven tire fabric, except tire Sq. yd.16 - 218 SXYZ cord fabric, and fuel-cell fabrics, wholly or in chief weight rayon and/or acetate. 65362 Used or reject fabric bearing Sq. yd.10 - 212 STVWXYZ the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65362 Parachute cloth of broad Sq. yd.R~ 218 SWXYZ woven fabrics, wholly or in chief weight cellulosic spun yarns. 65364 Used or reject fabric bearing1 Lb the design of any version of the flag_ of the United States of America. 65380 Other continuous tapes suit- Lb able for use in filament-wound structures, made of glass fibers having a modulus of elasticity of 10.5 times 106 psi or greater, or having a tensile strength to den- sity ratio (figure of merit) of 300,000 psi or greater.15 65380 Used or reject fabric bearing Sq. yd.37_ - the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. 65380 Broad and narrow woven Lb.37 fabrics, including tapes, made from silica or quartz fibers, whether or not coated or impregnated. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 212 STVWXYZ 500 222 STVWXYZ 500 212 STVWXYZ 500 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 PAGENO="0107" SECTION 6-MANTJFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE- UP ARTICLES AND RELATED PRoDucTs-Continued 65380 Pressure sensitive fiber glass tape. 65380 Other fabrics wholly or in chief weight glass fibers. 65390 Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of Amer- ica. 65401 Nylon webbing 65510 All flags of the United States of America, except new flags having 50 stars; and used or reject mate- rials bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America\ 65510 Felts and felt articles coated or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 65543 Textile fabrics, n.e.c., coated or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 654443 Textile fabrics, made from silica or quartz fibers, whether or not coated or impregnated. 65545 Textile base insulating tape and pressure sensitive tape coated or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 65545 Silicone rubber insulating tape. 65545 Other rubberized tape, tex- tile base, and textile fabrics, n.e.c., made of or employing synthetic rubber. 65584 Textile fabrics and articles used in machinery or plant, coated or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or co- polymers. (See § 399.2, Interpre- tation 22.) 65584 Textile fabrics and articles coated, covered or laminated with rubber, for use in machinery or plant. 65584 Other textile fabrics and articles used in machinery or plant, excluding belting, tubing and hose; other wicks; and gas mantles.39 [Report textile belting, tubing and hose in No. 65590.] 65590 Textile tubing and hose lined with or covered with other fluorocarbon polymers or co- polymers. (See § 399.2, Interpre- tation 22.) 65590 Other transmission, con- veyor or elevator belts and belt- ing, and textile tubing and hose, wholly or in chief weight of other textile fibers. 65692 All flags of the United States of America, except new flags having 50 stars. Lb 218 SYZ Lb 212 STVWXYZ 539 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and rnodity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special privi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* Lb Lb.3~ Lb 228 SXYZ 500 100 B 228 SYZ 500 B 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 B 500 Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 Sq. yth. - - 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E~-3 Sq. ycL - - - 222 STVWYYZ 500 25 Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 Lb 228 SWXYZ 500 100 B Sq. yd.~8~ 228 SYZ 500 B Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 Lb 218 SXYZ 500 100 B 500 B 500 500 500 E-3 500 B 500 Lb 218 SYZ Lb 222 STVWXYZ Lb 218 SYZ Lb 212 STVWXYZ See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0108" SECTION 6-MANUFACTTJR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued TEXTILE YARN, FABRiCS, MADE- U~ ARTICLES AND RELATED PRoDucTs-Continued 65692 Made-up textile articles, n.e.c., wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. 65692 Narrow woven fabrics coated or impregnated with fluo- rocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) NONMETALLIC MINERAL MANU- FACTURES, N.E.C. 45 Validated Proc- license Unit essing required for No. country groupL shown below* 540 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Contlnuecl Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups' S T V X Special p~ovi- sions list' Lb 222 STVWXYZ Lb - 222 STVWXYZ 218 SYZ 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 500 500 500 E-3 500 B 500 1,000 1,000 E-5 500 10013 66183 Asbestos-cement or fiber cc- Lb ment articles. 66230 High temperature refractory Lb.4I cements or bonding mortars, brick and similar shapes, and other refractory construction ma- terials, n.e.c., containing 97 per- cent or more by weight of mag- nesium oxide, beryllium oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zirconium oxide stabilized with lime and/or magnesium oxide. (Specify type of brick and similar shapes; specify name of other re- fractories.) 66230 Other refractory cements or Lb. 41_ - - - 218 SXYZ bonding mortars, brick and simi- lar shapes, and other refractory construction materials, n.e.c. (Specify type of brick and similar shapes; specify name of other re- fractories.) [Report noncon- struction refractory materials in No. 66370.1 66311 Other diamond grinding Carat 422 STVWXYZ 500 wheels for power-operated ma- chines, fabricated with polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, polyimidazo- pyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, or polyimide- polyamide. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) 66311 Other diamond grinding Carat 232 STVWXYZ 500 wheels for hand- or pedal-operated machines, fabricated with poly- imides, polybenzimidazoles, poly- imidazopyrrolones, aromatic poly- amides, polyparaxylylenes, or polyimide-polyamide. (Specify name and value of these sub- stances and total value of other materials.) 66311 Other grinding and polishing Lb 428 SXYZ 500 100 B wheels and stones, n.e.c., for power-operated machines. [Re- port net quantity of diamond grinding and polishing wheels and stones in terms of carat weight of embedded diamonds.] - 66311 Other grinding and polishing Lb 218 SXYZ 500 100 B wheels and stones, n.e.c., for hand- or pedal-operated machines. [Re- port net quantity of diamond grinding and polishing wheels and stones in terms of carat weight of embedded diamonds.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0109" 541 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits Special for shipments to provi. country groups* sions list* S T V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONMETALLIC MINERAL MANU- FACTURES, N.E.C.40-Continued 66312 Handpolishingstones,whet- Lb 218 SXYZ 500 100 B stones, oilstones, hones and similar stones, of artificial abrasive material. 66320 Abrasive paper and cloth, Ream 428 SXYZ 500 100 B coated with manufactured abra- sives, for use on power-operated machines, except dental abrasives. 66363 Carbon or graphite fibers in Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 any form (including chopped or maccrated) whether or not coated or impregnated; and products thereof.'3 66363 Other pyrolytic graphite Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 products, n.e.c. 66363 Other artificial graphite Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 products, n.e.c., in block, brick, plate, or rod form, smallest di- mension 2 inches or over. (Specify by name, size and boron content in parts per million.) 66363 Other articles of carbon or 218 SYZ 500 B graphite. [Report articles of car- bon or graphite for electrical pur- poses in No. 72996.] 66370 Beryllium oxide ceramic Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 E-5 tubes, crucibles, and shapes in sernifabricated or fabricated form. 66370 Crucibles containing 97 per- Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 E-5 cent or more by weight of magne- sium oxide, beryllium oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zir- coniuxn oxice stabilized with lime and/or magnesium oxide. (Specify number of crucibles, types of cru- cibles by type number, capacity of each in pounds, whether heavy or thin wall, and purity rating (per- cent.) 66370 Crucibles and other refrac- Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 E-5 tories of pyrolytic graphite. 66370 Refractory products other Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 E-5 than refractory construction ma- terials, n.e.c., containing 97 per- cent or more by weight of magne- sium oxide, beryllium oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zir- coilium oxide stabilized with lime anthor magnesium oxide. (Specify by name.) 66370 Other refractories made of Lb 212 STVWXYZ 500 E-5 nonpyrolytic artificial graphite having an apparent relative den- sity between 1.90 and 1.95 when compared to water at 60°F. (15.5°C.), in such forms as will not pass through a two-inch square hole. 66370 Other artificial graphite re- Lb 212 SPVWXYZ 100 500 500 E-8 fractory products, n.e.c., in block, brick, plate, or rod form, smallest dimension 2 inches or other. (Spe- cify by name, size, and boron con- tent in parts per million.) 66370 Other carbos, or graphite re- Lb 218 SYZ 500 B fractory products n.e.c 66370 Other refractory products, Lb 218 SXYZ 500 100 B other than refractory construction materials.42 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0110" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONMETALLIC MINERAL MANU- FACTURES, N.E.C.~°-ContInued 66381 Packing, gaskets, textiles, (43) 222 STVWXYZ yarns, and other manufactures of asbestos coated or impregnated with fluoro carbon polymers orco- polymers. (See § 399.2, Interpre- tation 22.) 66382 Asbestos clutch facings, In- No.44 218 SXYZ cluding linings; and asbestos brakeilnings. 66382 Friction materials of cellu- 218 SYZ lose or of minerals other than as- bestos. 66413 Other glass, unworked, in Lb 218 SYZ balls, rods, or tubes. 66420 Lens blanks, not optically Lb 242 STVWXYZ worked, of polycrystalline silicon of a purity of 99.9 percent up to but not including 99.99 percent. 66420 Nonfiexible fused fiber optic plates or bundles, not optically worked, in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 microns. 66470 Bulletproof windshields over Sq. ft 432 % inch thick, specially designed for aircraft.45 66470 Other laminated or tough- Sq. ft 438 SXYZ ened tempered safety glass for aircraft. 66492 Nonfiexible fused fiber optic 612 STVWXYZ plates or bundles, in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 microns, for cathode ray tubes. 66492 Electron tube blanks 218 SXYZ 66492 Other glass envelopes (in- (48) 218 SYZ cluding face plates, funnels, and tubes of glass), n.e.c. 66494 Silica or quartz fibers in any 222 STVWXYZ form (including chopped or macerated) whether or not coated or impregnated; and articles there- of, n.e.c. (including mats and felts).13 66494 Articles of glass fiber, as 222 STVWXYZ follows: (a) pipe and tubing, lined with or covered with fluoro- carbon polymers or copolymers, or (b) articles containing more than2opercent by weight of fluoro- carbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 66494 Nonflexible fused fiber optic 612 STVWXYZ plates or bundles, glass fiber, in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 microns. 66700 Other quartz crystals, natural Lb and synthetic, unworked or worked, not mounted, radio grade only. 66700 Other quartz crystals, Lb 618 SXYZ natural and synthetic, unworked or worked, not mounted. [Report optical quality in No. 86111, and mounted in No. 72998.] ~6700 Lithium-containing minerals 242 STVWXYZ (for example, spodumene). 2oe footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 542 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Contlnued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description ~ export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special provi- sions list* license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X 500 25 E-3 500 bOB 500 B 500 B 500 500 B Lb 622 STVWXYZ 250 500 250 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-2 500 100 B 250 500 250 500 100 B 500 B 500 25 25 500 25 250 500 250 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 * 500. 100 B 25 500 25 E-8 PAGENO="0111" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued IRON AND STEEL 67131 Shot, angular grit and wire Lb 268 SYZ pellets, of iron or steel. 67134 Carbonyl iron powder; and Lb 268 SYZ sponge iron or steel. 67134 Other iron or steel powders_ - Lb 268 SXYZ 67160 FerromolybdenUm; ferrobo- Lb 262 STVWXYZ ron; ferrocolumbium; ferrotanta- lum; and ferrocolumbium-tanta- mm. (Specify alloy content.) (See § 373.44.) 67160 Other ferrozirconium con- Lb taming more than 50 percent zir- conium. (Specify hafnium con- tent.) 67160 Ferrocobalt. [Report cobalt Lb 268 SWXYZ melting base materials in No. 68950.] 67160 Ferronickel containing 90 Lb 262 STVWXYZ percent or less nickel. (See § 373.42.) [Report other ferro- nickel in No. 68310.] 67160 Ferrovanadium Lb 268 SXYZ 67160 Ferrotitanium; ferrocarbon- Lb 268 SYZ titanium; and ferrotungsten. 67210 Puddled bars and pilings, Lb 268 SWXYZ blocks, lumps, and other primary forms of iron or steel, n.e.c. 67243 Other blooms, billets, ingots, Lb 262 STVWXYZ slabs, sheet bars, and roughly forged pieces, alloy steel, as fol- lows: (a) containing 6 percent or more cobalt, (b) AISI type 309- S-Cb-Ta, or (c) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying elements.47 67243 Other alloy steel billets, pro- Lb 268 SWXYZ jectile and shell steel. 67243 Other blooms, billets, ingots, Lb 268 SWXYZ slabs, sheet bars, and roughly forged pieces, alloy steel, special types Class ~ 48 67243 Other blooms, billets, ingots, Lb 268 SXYZ slabs, sheet bars, and roughly forged pieces, alloy steel. 67244 Blooms, billets, slabs, and Lb 268 SWXYZ sheet bars, projectile and shell steel. 67244 Other carbon steel blooms, Lb 268 SXYZ billets, slabs, sheet bars, and roughly forged pieces. 67273 Other alloy steel coils for Lb 268 SWXYZ rerolling. 67274 Carbon steel or iron coils for Lb 268 SWXYZ rerolling. 67290 Other nickel-bearing stain- Lb 262 STVWXYZ less steel blanks for tubes and pipes, as follows: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloy- Ing elements.47 67290 Blanks for tubes and pipes, Lb 268 SWXYZ alloy steel, special types Class ~ 48 67290 Other blanks for tubes and Lb 268 SXYZ pipes of iron or steel. 67313 Wire rods, alloy steel, special Lb 268 SWXYZ types Class ~ ~ 543 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED EASTERN ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued TO Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Unit Validated Proc- license essing required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups4 Special prlvi- sions list* No.~country groups shown below4 - S T V X B B. 100 B 500 100 E-7 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 bOB 500 100 100 B B 100 B 500 100 E-7 100 B 100 B 100 B 10013 100 B 100 B 100 B 500 100 E-7 100 B 100 B 100 B See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0112" 544 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below8 S T V X list* SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued IRON AND STEEL-Continued 67313 Other wire rods, as follows: Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B (a) containing 6 percent or more cobalt, (b) AISI type 309-S-Cb-- Ta, or (c) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying ele- ments.47 67313 Other alloy steel wire rods - Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B 67314 Wire rods, carbon steel Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B 67323 Bars and rods, alloy steel, Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B special types Class ~ 48 67323 Alloy steel bars and rods as Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B follows: (a) containing 6 percent or more cobalt, or (b) hot-rolled projectile or shell steel.47 67323 Nickel-bearing steel bars Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B and rods, as follows: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloy- ing elements.47 67323 Other alloy steel bars and Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B rods and hollow drill steel. 67324 Bars and rods, projectile and Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B shell steel, hot rolled carbon steel. 67343 Angles, shapes and sections Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B having amaximum cross sectional dimension of 3 inches or more, alloy steel, special types Class 2.~7 48 67343 Other nickel-bearing steel Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B angles, shapes and sections having amaximum cross sectional dimen- sion of 3 inches or more, as follows: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 per- cent or more of alloying ele- ments.47 67343 Other angles, shapes and sec- Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B tions having a maximum cross sectional dimension of 3 inches or more, alloy steel. 67353 Angles, shapes and sections Lb 268 SWXYZ ~. 100 B having a maximum cross sectional dimension of less than 3 inches, alloy steel, special types Class ~ 48 67353 Other alloy steel angles, Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B shapes, and sections having a maximum cross sectional dimen- sion of less than 3 inches as follows: (a) containing 6 percent or more cobalt, or (b) projectile or shell steel.47 67353 Nickel-bearing steel angles, Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B shapes and sections having a maximum cross sectional dimen- sion of less than 3 inches, as fol- lows: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 per- cent or more of alloying ele- ments.47 67353 Other angles, shapes, and Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B sections having a maximum cross sectional dimension of less than 3 inches, alloy steel. 67354 Angles, shapes, and sections, Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B projectile and shell steel, carbon steel, having a maximum cross sectional dimension of less than 3 inches. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0113" 545 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued IRON AND STEEL-Continued 67443 Alloy steel plates and sheets, suitable for making pipe having the following specifications: of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Insti- tute) test. 67443 Other alloy steel plates and sheets.49 67444 Carbon steel plates and sheets suitable for making pipe having the following specifica- tions: of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Institute) test. 67444 Skelp, carbon steel or wrought iron. 67444 Other iron or steel plates and sheets, including black plate.49 67470 Tin mill products. [Report terneplate in No. 67480.] 67480 Steel plates and sheets suit- able for making pipe having the following specifications: of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Insti- tute) test. 67480 Other steel plates and sheets, coated.49 67503 Alloy steel hoop and strip, inclnding skelp, suitable for mak- ing pipe having the following spec- ifications: of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Institute) test. 67503 Thermo bimetal, thermo- metal, and thermostatic metal, chief value steel. 67503 Alloy steel skelp, special types Class ~ 48 67503 Nickel-bearing stainless steel hoop, strip, and skelp, as follows: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying elements.47 67503 Other alloy steel skelp Lb 268 67503 Other alloy steel hoop and Lb 268 strip. 67504 Carbon steel hoop and strip, Lb 262 ineluding skelp, suitable for mak- ing pipe having the following spec- ifications: of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Institute) test. 67504 Other carbon steel skeip Lb 67504 Other carbon steel hoop and Lb strip. 67610 Standard tee rails, new Lb 67703 Wire, alloy steel, special Lb types Class 2.~7 48 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 97-627-68-pt. 2-8 Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Proc- license for shipments to provi- Unit essing required for country groups4 sions No. country groups list4 shown below4 S T V X 100 B 100 B B 100 B Lb 262 SVWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 262 SVWXYZ Lb 268 Lb 268 Lb 268 Lb 262 SXYZ SWXYZ SWXYZ SVWXYZ 100 E-8 100 B 100 E-8 100 B 100 B 100 B 100 E-8 100 B 100 E-8 100 E-8 100 B 100B 100 B 100B 100 E-8 Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 262 SVWXYZ Lb 262 SVWZYX Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ SXYZ SWXYZ SVWXYZ 268 SXYZ 268 SWXYZ 268 SYZ 268 SWXYZ PAGENO="0114" Department of Commerce export Proc- control commodity No. and coin- Unit essing modity description No. Validated license required for GLV f dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special pro ci- sions country groups shown below4 S T V X list4 SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued IaoN AND STEEL-Continued 67703 Alloy steel wire, glass to Lb 268 SWXYZ metal sealing alloy, containing 6 percent or more cobalt.47 67703 Nickel-bearing steel wire, as Lb 268 SWXYZ follows: (a) AISI type 309-S-- Cb-TA, or (b) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying elements.47 67703 Other alloy steelwire, coated Lb 268 SXYZ or uncoated. 67704 Carbon steel wire, bare or Lb 268 SXYZ coated, including galvanized. 67810 Cast iron pipe lined with or Lb 262 STVWXYX covered with other fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 67810 Other cast iron soil pipe Lb 268 SYZ 67850 Pressure tube and pipe fit- Lb 262 STVWXYZ tings having a tube or pipe size connection of 8 inches or more in- side diameter, for tube or pipe having a wall thickness of 8 per- cent or more of the inside diam- eter and made 01(a) stainless steel, or (b) other alloy steel containing 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium. 67850 Other forged steel pipe fit- Lb 262 SVWXYX tings having a pipe size connec- tion greater than 19 inches o.d. and designed for a working pres- sure of over 300 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Institute) test. 67850 Cast iron tube and pipe fit- Lb 268 SYZ tings. 67860 Seamless pressure tube and Lb 262 STVWXYZ pipe of 8 inches or more inside di- ameter, having a wall thickness of 8 percent or more of the inside diameter and made of (a) stainless steel, or (b) other alloy steel con- taining 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium. 67860 Pipes and tubes lined with Lb 262 STVWXYZ or covered with other fluorocar- bon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 67860 Other nickel-bearing stain- Lb 262 STVWXYZ less steel pipes and tubes as fol- lows: (a) AISI type 309-S- Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying elements.47 67860 Line pipe, carbon or alloy Lb 262 SVWXYZ steel, seamless or welded, of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and having a yield strength greater than 40,000 psi as determined by API (American Petroleum Insti- tute) test. 67860 Other line pipe, carbon or Lb 268 SWXYZ alloy steel, seamless or welded. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 1.) 67860 Pipes and tubes, alloy steel, Lb 268 SWXYZ special types Class 2.47 ~ 67860 Other steel pipes and tubes.. Lb 268 SXYZ See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 546 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued 100 B 100 B 100 B 100 B 500 100 E-8 B 500 100 E-8 B 500 500 100 E-8 500 100 E-8 100 E-8 100 B 100 B 100 B PAGENO="0115" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued IRON AND STEEL-Continued 67920 Nickel-bearing stainless steel castings, as follows, except grinding balls: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb--Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 per- cent or more of alloying ele- ments.47 50 67920 Castings, alloy steel, special types Class ~ 48 55 67920 Other alloy steel castings in the rough state.5° 67930 Nickel-bearing stainless steel forgings, as follows, except grinding balls: (a) AISI type 309-S-Cb-Ta, or (b) containing a total of 35 per- cent or more of alloying ele- ments.47 50 67930 Forgings, alloy steel, special types Class ~ 4860 67930 Other alloy steel forgings in the rough state.5° NONFERROUS METALS 51 68050 Silver ore, base bullion, and Cnt. troy 268 scrap and sweepings. oz. 68060 Silver bullion, refined Cnt. troy 268 oz. 68080 Silver coin, foreign mona- 268 tary. 52 68111 Silver-copper brazing alloy... Troy oz..... 268 68111 Other silver or silver alloy, Troy oz -- 268 unwrought or partly worked, not rolled. 68112 Rolled silver, unworked or Troy oz -- 268 SYZ partly worked. 68120 Other platinum and other Troy oz -- 268 SYZ metals of platinum group, un- worked or partly worked, n.e.c. 68211 Blister copper and other un- Lb refined copper. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.20(a).) 68212 Refined copper, including remelted, in cathodes, billets, ingots, except capper-base alloy ingots, wire bars, and other crude forms. (Also specify copper con- tent in pounds.) (Sse § 373.43(b).) 68212 Copper-base alloy ingots. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(c).) 68213 Master alloys of copper. (Specify percentage of each alloy- ing element, or the recognized standard and commercial brand or trade name.) (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 68221 Bars, rods, angles, shapes, sections, and wire of copper or copper-base alloy. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 68222 Plates, sheets, and strips (including perforated) of copper or copper-base alloy. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 100 B 100 B 547 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups4 Special provi- sions country groups shown below4 S T V X list4 Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb Lb Lb 268 SWXYZ 268 SYZ 268 SWZYX Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 268 SYZ 100 B B 100 B 100 B B B B 100 B B B B SYz SYZ SYz SWXYZ SYz 272 STVWXYZ PG Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 100 FG 100 PG Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 100 PG 100 PG Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 PG Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 PG See footnotes at end of table, p 611; PAGENO="0116" 100B 500 500 E-7 548 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONFERROUS METALS si_Con. 68223 Copper or copper alloy foil, Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 PG including paper-backed. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 68224 Copper or copper alloy Lb 272 STVWYXZ 100 100 PG powders and flakes. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 68225 Pressure tube and pipe, Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 PG copper-nickel alloy, of 8 inches or more inside diameter and having a wall thickness of 8 percent or more of the inside diameter. 68225 Other tubes, pipes, and Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 PG blanks therefor, and hollow bars of copper or copper-base alloy. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43 (d).) 68226 Pressure tube fittings and Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 pipe fittings, copper-nickel alloy, having a tube or pipe size connec- tion of 8 inches or more inside diameter, for tube or pipe having a wall thickness of 8 percent or more of the inside diameter. 68226 Other tube fittings and pipe Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 E-8 fittings of copper or copper-base alloy. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) 68310 Unwrought alloys composed Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, ir- respective of nickel content. 68310 Other nickel or nickel alloys, Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 unwrought. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) (See § 373.42.) 68321 Bars, rods, angles, shapes, Lb 262 STVWXYZ PG and sections of porous nickel hav- ing a purity of 99 percent or more. 68321 Bars, rods, angles, shapes, Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 sections, and wire of alloys com- posed of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, irrespective of nickel content. 68321 Other bars, rods, angles, Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 shapes, sections, and wire of nickel alloy containing 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel-copper alloys containing not more than 6 percent of other alloying elements. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) 68321 Other bars, rods, angles, Lb 268 SWXYZ shapes, sections, and wire of nickel or nickel alloy. 68322 Nickel powders with a par- Lb 262 STVWXYZ tide size of 200microns or over: and other nickel powder and flakes containing 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel-copper alloy powders and flakes containing not more than 6 percent of other alloying elements. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) 68322 Plates, sheets, strips, and foil Lb 282 STVWXYZ of porous nickel having a purity of 99 percent or more. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611 PG PAGENO="0117" Lb 268 SYZ B Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 100 B 549 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits Special for shipments to provi- country groups* sions list* S T V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONFERROUS METALS 51-Con. 68322 Bimetallic strip for thermo- Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 stats; and other plates, sheets, strips, and foil of nickel alloy con- taining 32 percent or more nickel except nickel-copper alloys contain- ing not more than 6 percent of ether alloying elements, and nickel-chrome electric resistancematerials. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) 68322 Plates, sheets, strips, pow- Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 ders, flakes, and foil of alloys com- posed of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, irrespective of nickel content. 68322 Other nickel or nickel alloy Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B plates, sheets, strips, powders, flakes, and foil. 68323 Tubes, pipes, blanks, and Lb 262 STVWXYZ FG fittings therefor, and hollow bars of porous nickel having a purity of 99 percent or more. 68323 Pressure tube and pipe fit- Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 tings containing 32 percent or more nickel, having a tube or pipe size connection of 8 inches or more inside diameter, for tube or pipe having a wall thickness of 8 per- cent or more of the inside diameter. 68323 Other tubes, pipes, blanks, Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 and hollow bars, of nickel contain- lug 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel-copper alleys contain- ing not more than 6 percent of other alloying elements. (Specify by name with complete metal analysis.) 68323 Tubes, pipes, blanks, and Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 fittings therefor, and hollow bars, of alloys composed of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, irrespective of nickel content. 68323 Other tubes, pipes, blanks, Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B and hollow bars of nickel or nickel alloy. 68323 Other tube fittings and pipe fittings of nickel or nickel alloy. 68324 Other nickel or nickel alloy electroplating anodes. (See § 373.42.) 68401 Aluminum alloy ingots and Lb 268 SWXYZ other unwrought forms, and bars, rods, angles, shapes, sections and bare wire having (a) an average copper content of 1 percent or more irrespective of other elements, or (b) an average copper content of less than 1 percent and (i) a zinc content of 4 percent or more, (ii) a silicon content of 3.5 percent or more, or (iii) a magnesium content of 9.5 percent or more. 68401 Other aluminum or alumi- Lb 268 SXYZ imm alloy bars, rods, angles, shapes and sections. 68401 Other aluminum alloy ingots Lb 268 SYZ and other unwrought forms, and bare wire. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 100 B PAGENO="0118" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONFERROUS METALS 51-Con. 68422 Aluminum alloy plates and sheets having (a) an average cop- per content of 1 percent or more irrespective of other elements, (b) an average copper content of less than 1 percent and (I) a zinc con- tent of 4 percent or more, (ii) a silicon content of 3.5 percent or more, or (iii) a magnesium content of 9.5 percent or more. 68422 Other aluminum or alumi- num alloy plates and sheets. 68424 Other aluminum or alumi- num alloy powder and flakes. 68425 Aluminum or aluminum alloywelded irrigation tubing, cut to length and not further fabri- cated. 68425 Other aluminum or alumi- num alloy tubes, pipes, and tube blooms having (a) an average copper content of 1 percent or more irrespective of other ele- ments, (b) an average copper con- tent of less than 1 percent and (I) azinc content of 4 percent ormore, (ii) a silicon content of 3.5 percent or more, or (iii) a magnesium con- tent of 9.5 percent or more. 68425 Other aluminum or alumi- num alloy tubes, pipes, and tube blooms. 68520 Lead or lead alloy powder, Lb 268 bricks, and burning bats. 68720 Britannia metal, wrought~~~- Lb 268 68931 Other magnesium or mag- Lb 268 nesium alloys, unwrought. 68932 Other magnesium or mag- Lb 268 nesium alloys, wrought. 68933 Other beryllium or beryllium Lb 268 alloys, wrought or unwrought, and waste and scrap. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 12.) 68941 Tungsten wire made from pressed-sintered tungsten. 68941 Tungsten or tungsten alloy waste and scrap; and tungsten powder. [Report tungsten carbide powder in No. 51470; mixtures, not agglomerated, in No. 59999; and tool tips, plates, or sticks in No. 69526.1 68941 Tungsten or tungsten alloy press-sintered forms weighing 15 pounds up to but not Including 20 pounds. 68941 Tungsten or tungsten alloy pressed-sintered forms weighing less than 15 pounds; and tungsten or tungsten alloy pressed-sintered sheets less than 12 inches inwidth. 68942 Molybdenum or molybde- Lb num alloy waste and scrap. (See § 373.44.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 550 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Valldated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S P V X Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 268 SYZ Cnt.lb~ 268 SYZ Lb 268 SYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B B. B B 100B 100 B 100 B B B B 100 B 500 100 E-8 B 100 B 100B Lb 268 SXYZ SXYZ SYz SYz SYZ SxYz Lb 262 STVWXYZ Lb 268 SYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 268 SXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 PAGENO="0119" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued NONFERROUS METALS 51-Con. 68942 Molybdenum or molybde- num alloy clean wire, not exceed- ing 500 microns in diameter, and which, after having been fully annealed, has an elongation factor not exceeding 5 percent for diam- eters up to 200 microns, and not exceeding 10 percent for diameters from 200 to 500 microns. 68942 Other molybdenum or mo- lybdenum alloys, wrought or un- wrought, including other wire. (See § 373.44.) 68943 Other tantalum metal alloys, wrought and unwrought, and waste and scrap. (Specify by name.) 68950 Bismuth or bismuth alloys, wrought or unwrought, except bul- lion, and waste and scrap. 68950 Other cobalt or cobalt alloy, wrought or unwrought, and waste and scrap. 68950 Other niobium (columbium) alloys, wrought and unwrought, and waste and scrap. (Specify by name.) (See § 399.2, Interpreta- tions 10 and 12.) 68950 Gallium metal powders; and gallium metal, alloys, and amal- gams, except electronic grades con- taining less than 1 percent gallium. 68950 Germanium metal having a a resistivity of 50 ohms centimeter or greater. 68950 Other germanium metal and alloys. 68950 Rhenium metal and rhenium metal alloys, wrought or un- wrought. 68950 Polycrystalline silicon of a purity of 99.9 percent up to but not including 99.99 percent. 68950 Thermo bimetal, thermo- metal, and thermostatic metal, n.e.c. 68950 Other titanium alloys, wrought and unwrought, includ- ing intermediate mill shapes, and waste and scrap. (Specify by name.) (See § 399.2, Interpreta- tions 10 and 12.) 68950 Other vanadium metal and vanadium alloys, wrought or un- wrought. 68950 Other zirconium or zircon- ium alloys containing more than 50 percent zirconium, wrought and unwrought, and waste and scrap. (Specify by name and haf- nium content.) (See § 399.2, Inter- pretations 10 and 12.) 68950 Other base metals and alloys, n.e.c., wrought or unwrought, and waste and scrap. 551 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 Lb 262 STVW\YZ 500 100 E-8 Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 E-7 Lb 242 STVWXYZ 500 E-7 Lb 248 SWXYZ 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ .500 E-7 Li) 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-7 Lb 268 SWXYZ 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-8 Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B Lb 262 STVWXYZ .500 500 E-8 Lb 268 SYZ See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0120" SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURES OF METAL, N.E.C. 69110 Other iron or steel sheet Lb 268 SWXYZ metal construction material, ex- cept central heating or cooling ducts: and iron and steel bridges and parts. 69110 Bonded, brazed or welded 262 STVWXYZ structural sandwich constructions, including cores, face sheets and attachment materials, manufac- tured in whole or in part from precipitation hardened stainless steel. 69110 Portholes specially designed 408 SWXYZ for military watercraft. 69110 Steel scaffolding equipment; (33) 268 SYZ and fabricated steel plate, includ- ing stacks and weldments. 69120 Bridges and structural parts, 268 SWXYZ aluminum. 69211 Other containers, iron or No 212 STVWXYZ steel, jacketed only, for the storage of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over.54 69211 Other steel storage tanks, No 218 SWXYZ lined. 69212 Other containers, copper or No 212 STVWXYZ copper alloy, jacketed only, for the storage of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain tempera- tures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capac- ity or over.M 69212 Gas storage containers, cop- No 218 SWXYZ per. 69212 Other containers for storage ~ 218 SXYZ and manufacturing use, and septic tanks, lined or unlined, copper. [Report containers, copper, less than 80 gallons capacity in No. 69892.] 69213 Other containers, aluminum No 212 STVWXYZ or aluminum alloy, jacketed only, for the storage of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain temper- atures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capac- ity or over.54 69213 Other containers for storage Lb.5~ 218 SWXYZ and manufacturing use, lined or unlined, aluminum. [Report con- tainers, aluminum, less than 80 gallon capacity in No. 69899.] 69221 Other containers, iron or steel, jacketed only, for the trans- portation of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain tempera- tures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over. [Report containers for mounting on trucks or trailers in No. 73163.] ~ 69221 Other gas shipping contain- No 218 SWXYZ ers, iron or steel. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 552 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups° sions country groups - list* shown below* S T V X 500 100 B 100 500 100 500 100 B 500 B 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B No 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B PAGENO="0121" 553 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups° sions country groups list* shown below* S P V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTIJR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURERS OF METAL, N.E.C-Continued 69222 Other containers, aluminum No 212 STVWXYZ 600 500 500 E-8 or aluminum alloy, jacketed only, for the transportation of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over. [Report con- tainers for mounting on trucks or trailers in No. 73163.] s4 69222 Other gas shipping contain- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B ers, aluminum. 69231 Other compressed gas cylin- No 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 ders, filled or unfilled, iron or steel, jacketed only, for the storage or transportation of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over.54 69231 Other compressed gas cylin- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B ders, filled or unfilled, iron or steel. 69232 Other compressed gas cylin- No 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 ders, filled or unfilled, aluminum or aluminum alloy, jacketed only, for the storage or transportation of liquefied gases, (a) designed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over54 69232 Other compressed gas cylin- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B ders, filled or unfilled, aluminum or aluminum alloy. 69299 Other containers which are No 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-8 instruments of international trade, filled or unfilled, all metals, jacketed only, for the transporta- tion of liquefied gases, (a) de- signed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons ca- pacity or over.54 69299 Other gas shipping con- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B tainers which are instruments of international trade, filled or un- filled, all metals. 69311 Wire cable, rope, strand, and Lb 268 SWXYZ 500 100 B cord, stainless steel, suitable for aircraft. 69311 Other wire cable, rope, Lb 268 SXYZ 500 100 B plaited bands, slings, and similar articles, iron or steel. 69312 Wire cable, rope, strand, and Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 E-S cord, phosphor bronze. 69312 Other wire cable, rope, Lb 272 STVWXYZ 100 100 100 plaited bands, slings, and similar articles, copper or copper alloy.67 69313 Wire cable, rope, plaited Lb 268 SWXYZ 500 100 B bands, slings, and similar articles, aluminum, having (a) an average copper content of 1 percent or more irrespective of other ele- ments; or (b) an average copper content of less than 1 percent and (i) a zinc content of 4 percent or more, (ii) a silicon content of 3.5 percent or more, or (iii) a mag- nesium content of 9.5 percent or more.57 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0122" No- 408 SWZYX (60) - 402 SVWXYZ 500 B 500 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 100 .B 500 .100 B 500 B~ 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 bOB. 500 1,000 E-12 554 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURERS OF METAL, N.E.C-Continued 69313 Other wire cable, rope, Lb 268 SYZ plaited bands, slings, and similar articles, aluminum.07 69320 Barbedwire,ironorsteel Lb 268 SYZ 69320 Other wire, iron or steel, of Lb 268 SXYZ types used for fencing. 69331 Fence gates, wire cloth, and Sq. ft.5.. - - 268 SYZ other woven wire products, iron or steel. 69332 Wire cloth, copper Sq. fL... - -- 268 SXYZ 69332 Wire cloth, copper-base alloy; Sq. ~ -- 268 SYZ and other copper and copper-base alloy woven wire products. 69333 Other woven wire products, Sq. ft 268 SXYZ aluminum. 69412 Boat spikes, wire nails, wire Lb 268 SXYZ staples, and wire spikes, copper. 69422 Bolts, nuts, screws, rivets, Lb 268 SYZ washers, and similar articles, copper. 69521 Power saw blades, metal No 428 SWXYZ working. 69523 Diamond dressers, andparts, 218 SWXYZ n.e.c. 69523 Hand tools and parts, n.e.c., 218 SXYZ as follows: other tools incorporat- ing industrial diamonds; die. stocks; pipe threading tools; tapping tools; tap guides, mag- netic; filing blocks, nonferrous metals; and shoe lasts. 69524 Broaching tools specially No - 422 STVWXYZ designed for production of jet engine blades and engine discs for nonmilitary types of engines. 69524 Other hollow deep-bole drills No 422 STVWXYZ 69524 Parts, n.e.c., specially de- 422 STVWXYZ signed for the following tools: (a) broaching tools specially de- signed for production of jet engine blades and engine discs for non- military types of engines, or (b) hollow deep-hole drills, except small arms deep-hole drills. (Specify type and model of tool for which parts are designed.) 69524 Other surface-broaching (30) 428 SWXYZ tools, and parts; other tools and parts for metal-working machines; diamond dies for metalworking machines; diamond boring and turning tools whether or not for metalworking machines; and other tools incorporating indus- trial diamonds. 69524 Other drill bits, core bits, and reamers containing diamonds. 69524 Rock drill bits and core bits having cones or sections which rotate freely and independently of the rotation of the body of the bit; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 69524 Other rock drill bits, core (60) 408 SXYZ bits, and reamers, n.e.c., and parts, n.e~c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 500 500 1,000 1,001) 500 500. 500 500 100 B 500 100 B PAGENO="0123" 555 SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURERS OF METAL, N.E.C-Continued 69524 Tool bit and die blanks con- taining tungsten carbide or molybdenum. 69525 Machine knives and blades, No metal cutting. 69526 Tool tips, etc., unmounted, of sintered metal carbides. 69812 Hardware and parts, copper or copper base alloy, except trans- portation hardware;furniture hard- ware; builders' hardware; hinges and butts; track for doors; tracks and handles for bathtub enclosures; stair treads; and trolleys for folding cha2rs. 69854 Belt fasteners (other than buckles), clasps, grommets, and similar articles of copper or copper alloy. 69861 Coil springs, torsion springs, leaf springs, and leaves for springs, iron or steel, for other vehicles. 69862 Springs and leaves for springs, copper or copper alloy. 69862 Other wire springs, copper or copper alloy. 69881 Sprocket and other power transmission chains and parts, copper or copper alloy. 69881 Other chains and parts, copper or copper alloy. 69882 Flexible tubing and piping, base metal. 69887 Welding rods and wires, iron or steel, as follows: (a) con- tahuing 6 percent or more cobalt, (b) AISI type 309-S-Cb-TA, or (c) containing a total of 35 percent or more of alloying elements.47 69887 Cobalt or cobalt alloy weld- ing rods, wires, and electrodes, including brazing rods. 69887 Copper or copper alloy welding and soldering rods and wire, including tubes and plates for welding and soldering. 69887 Other molybdenum alloy welding rods, wires, and elec- trodes, including brazing rods. (Specify by name.) 69887 Nickel or nickel alloy welding and soldering rods, wires, tubes, plates, and electrodes, composed of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, ir- respective of nickel content. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) 69887 Other nickel or nickel alloy welding and soldering rods, wires, tubes, plates, and electrodes, including brazing rods. 69887 Other niobium (columbium) alloy welding rods, wires, and electrodes, including brazing rods. 69887 Other tantalum alloy weld- ing rods, wires, and electrodes, including brazing rods. (Specify by name.) NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc. corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groupst Special provi- sions country groups shown belowt S P V X listt No 428 SXYZ 428 SWXYZ 428 SXYZ 218 SXYZ 218 SXYZ Lb 438 SWXYZ Lb Lb Lb 218 SWXYZ 218 SXYZ 418 SXYZ Lb 218 Lb 218 Lb 268 SXYZ SYZ SWXYZ 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 100 100 100 500 500 500 E-8 100 100 100 500 100 B Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 262 STVWXYZ Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 262 STVWXYZ.. 500 500 500 E-8 Lb 262 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 E-8 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0124" Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below5 GLV dollar value limits Special for shipments to provi- country groups° sions list5 S T V X 556 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED `ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Unit SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURERS OF METAL, N.E.C.-Continued 69887 Other welding and soldering Lb 268 SXYZ rods and wire, including tubes and plates for welding or soldering. 69891 Other containers, iron or No 212 STVWXYZ steel, jacketed only, for the storage of liquefied gases, designed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.).54 69891 Other steel storage tanks, 218 SWSYZ lined. [Report storage containers, iron or steel, of 80 gallons capacity or over in No. 69211; and shipping containers, iron or steel, regardless of capacity in No. 69221.1 69891 Other electrical steel punch- Lb 268 SWXYZ ings. 69891 Articles of iron or steel, as (62) 218 SXYZ follows: body armor;61 crucibles; cutting electrodes, ceramic-cov- ered, for underwater operations; Dempster Dumpster® containers (for use with Dempster Dumps- ter® hoisting units); gear blanks; oil seals, steel encased (general purpose); submarine cable pro- tectors; and fabricated wire prod- ucts, except: cotton bale ties and buckles; grating with wire center; wire nets; and wire ripe clamps. 69891 Other articles of iron or steel, 218 SYZ n.e.c.61 69892 Other containers, copper or No 212 STVWXYZ copper alloy, jacketed only, for the transportation or storage of lique- fied gases, (a) designed to main- tain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over.54 69892 Other gas shipping and stor- 218 SWXYZ ago containers, copper or copper alloy. [Report storage containers, copper or copper alloy, of 80 gal- ions capacity or over in No. 69212.1 69892 Copper or copper-base alloy Lb 272 STVWXYZ castings and forgings. (Also spe- cify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.43(d).) 69892 Copper or copper-base alloy Lb 272 STVWXYZ articles, as follows: (a) fabricated anodes, and (b) cores (mold in- serts). (Also specify copper con- tent in pounds~) 69892 Articles of copper or copper 218 SYZ alloy, the following only: anchors formarine use; bead chains; brack- ets, for mounting outboard mo- tors: bulletin boards; caskets; clothes-line (dryer) reels; fog horns, nonelectric, for ships; gutter troughs; hinge chaplets; hose swivels, except copper alloy; lids for boxes; mooring swivels; oar- locks; pipe saddles, except copper alloy; tool boxes and tool chests, empty; and utility boxes. 69892 United States coins not con- 218 SXYZ taming silver.52 See footnotes at end of table, p, Oil, 500 100 B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B 100 100 100 PG 100 100 100 E-8 500 B 500 100 B PAGENO="0125" SECTION 6-MANTJFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURERS OF METAL N.E.C-Continued 69892 Other articles of copper or copper alloy, n.e.c. 69899 Other containers, nonferrous No metals, n.e.c., jacketed only, for the transportation or storage of liquefied gases, as follows: (a) de- signed to maintain temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 1300 C.), or (b) 500 gallons capacity or over.54 69899 Other gas shipping and stor- 218 SWXYZ age containers of nonferrous metals, n.e.c. [Report copper con- tainers in No. 69212 or 69892; alu- minum shipping containers in No. 69222 or 69232; and aluminum storage containers of 80 gallons capacity or over in No. 69213.1 69899 Aluminum alloy castings and forgings which have (a) an average copper content of 1 per- cent or more irrespective of other elements; or (b) an average copper content of less than 1 percent and (i) a zinc content of 4 percent or more, (ii) a silicon content of 9.5 percent or more, or (iii) a magne- slum content of 9.5 percent or more. 69899 Other beryllium alloy cast- Lb 268 ings and forgings. 69899 Bismuth or bismuth alloy Lb 268 castings and forgings. 69899 Cobalt or cobalt alloy cast- Lb 268 ings and forgings. 69899 Gallium or gallium alloy- Lb 262 castings and forgings, except of elec- tronic grades containing less than 1 percent gallium. 69899 Germanium metal castings and forgings having a resistivity of 50 ohms centimeter or greater. 69899 Other germanium metal Lb 268 castings and forgings. 69899 Other lithium or lithium Lb 242 alloy castings and forgings. 69899 Other molybdenum or moly- Lb 262 bdenum alloy castings and forg- ings. (Specify by name.) 69899 Nickel or nickel alloy cast- ings and forgings. 69899 Other niobium (columbium) or niobium alloy castings and forg- ings. (Specify by name.) 69899 Polonium metal castings and forgings. 69899 Rhenium or rhenium alloy castings and forgings. 69899 Other tantalum or tantalum alloy castings and forgings. (Speci- fy by name.) 69899 Other titanium or titanium alloy castings and forgings. (Speci- fy by name.) 69899 Tungsten or tungsten alloy castings and forgings, press-sinter- ed forms weighing 15 pounds up to but not including 20 pounds. 557 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- cam- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions list0 country groups shown below4 S T V X 218 SXYZ 212 STVWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ SXYZ SXYZ SWXYZ STVWXYZ 500 100B 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 E-7 500 E-7 500 100 B 500 E-8 100 500 100 E-8 500 100 B 100 500 100 E-8 500 E-7 500 E-7 100 500 100 E-8 Lb 262 STVWXYZ SWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ Lb 268 SWXYZ Lb 262 STVWXYZ Lb Lb Lb 262 262 262 STVWXYZ STVWXYZ STVWXYZ Lb 262 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 E-8 Lb 268 SWXYZ 500 100 B ~ee footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0126" 500 100 B 500 E-7 500 500 500 E-8 500 100 E-8 500 100 B 500 100 B 558 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued ` Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- `Unit essing No. ~ Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list5 shown below* S T V X SECTION 6-MANUFACTUR- ED GOODS CLASSIFIED CHIEFLY BY MATERIAL- Continued MANUFACTURES OF METAL, N.E.C-Continued 69899 Vanadium or vanadium alloy Lb 268 SXYZ castings and forgings. 69899 Yttrium, or yttrium alloy Lb . 242 STVWXYZ. castings and forgings. 69899 Other zirconium or zirco- Lb 262 STVWXYZ nium alloy castings and forgings containing more than 50 percent zirconium. (Specify by name and specify hafnium content.) 69899 Other nonferrous metal cast- Lb 268 SYZ 500 B ings and forgings, n.e.c. [Report copper or copper base alloy cast- ing and forgings in No. 69892.1 69899 Other articles wholly made Lb 262 STVWXYZ . 500 E-8 of zirconium or zirconium alloys. (Specify zirconium and hafnium content.) 69899 Wire mesh, all types, includ- Lb 212 STVWYXZ 100 500 100 E-8 ing electro-formed, containing 95 percent or more nickel, with 60 or more wires per linear centimeter or the equivalent thereof. 69899 Bonded, brazed or welded Lb 262 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 structural sandwich construc- tions, including cores, face sheets and attachment materials, manu- factured in whole or in part from beryllium, molybdenum, niobium (columbium), tantalum, titanium, tungsten, and their alloys, or any combination of such materials. 69899 Other niobium (columbium) Lb , 262 STVWXYZ wire and cable. 69899 United States coins not con- 218 SXYZ taming silver.52 69899 Other articles of nonferrous (63) 218 SXYZ metals, n.e.c.'3 SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- "MENT MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELEcTRIC 13 64 71110 Water tube boilers, marine 402 STVWXYZ , 500 type, designed to have a heat release rate (at maximum rating) equal to 180,000 B.T.U., up to but not including 190,000 B.T.U., per hour per `cubic foot of furnace volume; and specially designed . , parts, n.e.c. `(Specify character- istics.) 71110' Other water tube boilers, ` 408 SWXYZ ` 100 B marine type, desighed to operate at temperatures above . 850° F.; and specially designed parts, ii.e.c.' (Specify designed operating tern- perature.) 71110 Other steam generating (63) 408 SXYZ 100 B boilers; and parts, nec. , See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0127" 559 402 STVWXYZ 500 500 (67) 408 SWXYZ 100 B (67) 402 STVWXYZ 500 (67) 402 STVWXYZ 500 100 (67) 408 SXYZ 100 B 402 STVWXYZ 500 408 SWXYZ 100 B - 100 B 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-2 432 STVWXYZ 1,000 1, 000 E-2 NON-C000M CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description .. export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S P V X list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELECTRIC 13 64-Continued 71120 Boiler superheaters, feed- water heaters, and economizers for marine steam boilers designed to have a heat release rate (at max- imum rating) equal to 180,000 B.T.U., up to but not including 190,000 B.T.U., per hour per cubic foot of furnace volume; and spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c.66 (Specify character. istics.) 71120 Boiler superheaters, feed- water heaters, and economizers, for other marine steam boilers designed to operate at tempera- tures above 850~ F; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 71120 Tubular type heat ex- changers designed to operate at pressures of 1,500 psi and above and with all flow contact surfaces made of or lined with 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium; and specially designed parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. (Give full specifi- cations.) 71120 Heat exchangers and heat- exchanger type condensers, tubu- lar, designed for use in steam power generation and to operate at pressures of 300 psi and over and with all flow contact surfaces made of any of the following ma- terials: aluminum, nickel, titan- ium, zirconium, or alloys con- taining 60 percent or more nickel, either separately or combined (specify pressure and type of metal); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 71120 Other steam generating boil- er accessories, n.e.c.; and parts, n.e.c. 71130 Steam turbines designed for use of saturated steam for an out- put of 2,000 horsepower (1,500 kilowatts) up to and including 100,000 horsepower (75,000 kilo- watts); and parts and accessories, n.e.c. (Specify horsepower or kilo- watts.) 71130 Steam turbines designed for turbogenerators 60,000 kilowatts and over; and parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. 71130 Other steam turbines and 408 SXYZ engines, n.e.c., and parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. 71141 Internal combustion aircraft No engines. (Specify make, model, and horsepower.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 20.) 71141 Other parts and accessories, n.e.c., specially designed for in- ternal combustion aircraft en- gines.68 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0128" Validated Proc- license Unit essing required for No. country groups~ shown below* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELECTRIC 13 14-Contlnued 71142 Other jet, turbo-prop, turbo- No shaft, and gas turbine aircraft engines. (Specify make, model, and pound thrust or horse- power.) 88 71142 Other parts and accessories, n.e.c., specially designed for jet, turbo-prop, turbo-shaft, and gas turbine engines under No. 71142 which are not subject to the Im- port Certificate/Delivery Verifi- cation procedure. (Specify make, model, and pound thrust or horse- power of engine.) 58 71150 Diesel engines, nonmagnetic, (69) 50 brake horsepower and over, having a nonmagnetic content exceeding 50 percent, up to but not exceeding 65 percent of total weight (specify brake horsepower at rated r.p.m.); and other spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. 71150 Other diesel engines, 1,500 (60) brake horsepower and over, `with rotary speeds of 700 r.p.m. and over; and other parts and acces- sories therefor. (Specify make, model, and brake horsepower at rated r.p.m.) 71150 Outboard motors over 15 horsepower, and other internal combustion engines, n.e.c., includ- ing other diesel engines, and engines for watercraft and auto- motive vehicles; and other parts and accessories, n.e.c. [Report internal combustion engines for aircraft in No. 71141.] 71160 Gas turbines, n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c. [Report gas turbines for aircraft in No. 71142.] 71181 Parts, n.e.c., specially fabri- 608 cated for water turbines and water engines 200,000 kilowatts and over. (Specify by name.) 71181 Water turbines and water (70) 408 SXYZ engines, n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c. 71189 Air starters, air turbines, and (6~) 432 STVWXYZ hydraulic motors, n.e.c., specially designed for aircraft; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71189 Hydrojet propulsion units 438 for watercraft; and parts, n.e.c. 71189 Other engines, n.e.c., and 408 parts, n.e.c. 71220 Mechanical cotton pickers, (78) 208 and specially designed parts and attachments therefor; beet har- vesters, 4-row and larger; and field hay wafering or pelletizing ma- chines, and any machines design- ed for similar operations. 71220 Other self-propelled agricul. 208 SYZ turalmachines for harvesting, cut- ting, threshing, and sorting; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 560 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, TUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S T V X Special provi- sions list* 432 STVWXYZ L 432 STVWXYZ 500 E-2 1,000 1,000 E-2 500 438 SWXYZ 100 B 432 STVWXYZ (60) 438 SXYZ 100 B 438 SXYZ SWXYZ 100 B 100 B SxYz SXYZ SWYZ 100B 500 500 100 B bOB 500 B 500 B See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0129" 561 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export d com- . Unit ~ Proc- essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELECTRIC 17 64-Continued 71250 Nonmilitary type tracklay- No 402 SVWXYZ E-11 ing tractors, 135 horsepower and over; and nonmilitary type con- tractors' off-highway wheel trac- tors, 135 horsepower and over. (Specify as non-military and state horsepower.)72 ~ 71250 Nonmi itary type tracklay- No 408 SXYZ 100 B Ing tractors, under 135 horsepower; and nonmilitary type contractors' off-highway wheel tractors, under 135 horsepower. (Specify as non- military and state horsepower.)73 71250 Other wheel tractors, 125 No 202 SVWXYZ E-15 power takeoff horsepower and over. 71250 Other wheel tractors, 30 No 208 SYZ 500 B power takeoff horsepower, up to but not including 125 power takeoff horsepower. 71299 Self-propelled agricultural (74) 208 SYZ 500 B machinery, n.e.c.; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71410 Electric typing devices capa- No 218 SWXYZ 100 B ble of being connected to and operating over a wire communica- tion circuit. 71410 Videotypers. ® No 218 SXYZ 100 B 71410 Multitype typewriters; and No 218 SYZ B automatic typing devices with punched tape mechanisms (for example, Justowriters®). 71420 Accounting and bookkeep- No 218 SXYZ 100 B ing machines, new; and calcula- tors, new and used. 71420 Listing-adding machines, No 218 SYZ B new; and accounting and book- keeping machines, used. 71430 Flexowriters® specially de- No 622 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 signed for use with electronic computers. 71430 Statistical machines used in No 628 SXYZ 100 B conjunction with punched cards or tape, including auxiliary ma- chines, the following only: billing machines, calculating machines, Flexowriters® for other than com- puter use, Computypers®, and listing-adding machines. 71430 Other statistical machines No 218 SXYZ 100 B used in conjunction with punched cards or tape, Including auxiliary machines. 71492 Parts and accessories for 622 STVWXYZ 500 500 Flexowriters® specially designed for use with electronic computers. 71492 Parts and accessories for 628 SXYZ 100 B billing machines, calculating ma- chines, Computypers,® Flexo- writers® and listing-adding ma- chines under No. 71430 which are not specially designed for use with computers. 71492 Parts and accessories speci- 218 SWXYZ 100 B ally designed for electric typing devices capable of being con- nected to and operating over a wire communication circuit. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 97-627-68-pt. 2-9 PAGENO="0130" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELECTRIC 1364-Continued 71492 Parts and accessories for the 218 SXYZ following machines: accounting and bookkeeping machines; cal- culators, except punched card types and except pocket types; Fotolist® machines; Videotypers®; and sta- tistical machines for use in con- junction with punched cards or tape, except electronic computer auxiliary machines. 71492 Parts and accessories for the 218 SYZ following machines: multitype typewriters; automatic typing devices with punched tape mech- anisms (for example, Justowrit- ers®); and listing-adding ma- chines. MACHINES AND MACHINE TOOLS FOR WORKING METALS [Report parts in No. 71954] 71510 Jig boring machines with longitudinal, transverse or ver- tical table travel exceeding 44 inches. 71510 Automatic vertical boring andturning mifis (including ver- tical turret lathes), cycle type. 71510 Hollow drill deep-hole drill- ing machines. 71510 Gear making and/or finish- ing machinery capable of the pro- duction of gears of a module finer than 0.5 mm. (diametral pitch finer than 48) but which are not capable of meeting a quality standard better than AGMA 10 or equivalent. (See § 399.2, Inter- pretation 3.) 71510 Other internal grinding ma- chines specially designed for the utilization of one or more spindle heads capable of speeds over 80,000rpm. 71510 Grinding machines for No 422 broaching tools, automatic cycle, automatic sizing. 71510 -Jig grinding machines with longitudinal, transverse or ver- tical travel exceeding 44 inches: 71510 Single-spindle automatic chucking lathes, and single- spindle between-center lathes. 71510 Machine tools designed for or equipped with electronic closed loop control systems designed solely for positioning operations. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 7.) 71510 Other presses, as follows: (a) No 422 hydraulic presses with rated capa- city over 5,000 tons up to and in- cluding 10,000 tons, and (b) me- chanical presses with rated capa- city over 5,000 tons. (Specify model and rated tonnage capa- city.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 562 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and corn- modity description ~ Unit Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S T V X Special provi- sions list* bOB B. No 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 No 422 SVWXYZ 500 No 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 No 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 No 422 STVWTXYZ 500 500 - STVWXYZ 500 500 No 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 No 428 SXYZ 100 B No 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 STVWXYZ 500 500 PAGENO="0131" 100 B - bOB 500 500 -100B - 100 B 563 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1908-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X Special provi- sions lists 500 500 500 500 500 500 SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued MACHINES AND MACHINE TOOLS FOR WORKING METALS-Con. 71510 Other presses specially de- No 422 SVWXYZ signed for the manufacture of steel pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d., as follows: (a) 0-ing presses, (b) U-ing presses, and (c) straight- ener-expander presses. 71510 Forging hammers as follows: No 422 STVWXYZ (a) counter-blow hammers having rated sizes of 25,000 kilogram me- ters (181,250 foot-pounds) or more, (b) rotary impact forging ham- mers of rated sizes of 10,000 foot- pounds or more, (c) horizontal impact hammers, (d) forging ham- mers having falling weight exceed- ing 10 tons, and (e) other steam, air, or mechanical hammers of rated size exceeding 10 tons. (Spe- cify type, falling weight, or rated size.) 71510 Spin-forming maChines with No 422 STVWXYZ drive motors of over 25 horsepower up to but not including 50 horse- power.76 71510 Portable. pipe bending ma- No 422 STVWXYZ. chines capable of bending pipe of 16 inch diameter and over. 71510 Portable driffing machines No 422 SVWXYZ capable of tapping steel line pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. without interruption of flow. 71510 Bonding machines for ap- No 428 SXYZ plying fins on tubing; and axle straighteners. - 71510 Other metal-cutting and No 428 SWXYZ metalworking machines and ma- chine tools.76 71521 Other centrifugal casting 422 STVWXYZ machines capable of casting tubes 6 feet or more in length with a wall thickness of 2 inches or over; and specially designed parts. 71521 Bessemer converters, open 428 SXYZ hearth converters, and other metallurgical converters, and parts, n.e.c. 71521 Other foundry machines and 428 SWXYZ equipment; and parts, flee. ROLLING MILLS AND PARTS (See § 399.2, Interpretation 16) 71522 Metal rolling mills with (77) 422 STVWXYZ multiple work rolls rotating in a planetary form around the back- up rolls (for example, Senzimir hot mills); and specially designed parts and accessories, except work rolls. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611; 500 500 PAGENO="0132" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ROLLING MILLS AND PARTS-Con. 71522 Other metal rolling mills, (77) sheet, plate, strip, or foil, except aluminicm foil mills, more than 3 rolls high (including dual purpose mills for 2 or 4 high operation), which achieve special lateral and! or longitudinal contour control by one or more of the following meth- ods or means: (a) incorporating closed loop electronic continuous gauge controls, (b) by use of control tensiometers for measur- lug and automatically maintain- ing appropriate adjustment of tension of metal being rolled, or (c) any other features for achiev- ing special lateral and/or longitu- dinal contour controls compara- ble to (a) or (b) above; and specially designed parts and acces- sories, except work rolls. 71522 Other continuous cold sheet and strip mills of more than three- high roll stands; and specially designed parts and accessories, except work rolls. 71522 Other plate rolling mills; (77) other continuous four-high hot strip and sheet mills; and pipe mills specially designed for the manufacture of steel pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d.; and specially designed parts and acces- sories, except work rolls. 71522 Other rolling mill machines (77) and equipment, including pipe or tube mill machines; and parts and accessories; and all work rolls for rolling mills. 71523 Flame cuttingmachineswith tracer heads designed for or equipped with electronic closed loop control systems designed solely for positioning operations; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. (See § 399.2, In- terpretation 7.) 71523 Other gas operated welding, 428 SWXYZ cutting, brazing, and surface tem- pering machines and appliances; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. 71711 Machines for extruding man- No 418 SYZ made fibers, and other machines for preparing and processing natural or man-made fibers into yarns, ~ind for winding. 71713 Other parts, accessories, 418 SYZ attachments, and auxiliary ma- chines, n.e.c., for machines for extruding man-made fibers, and for other machines for preparing and processing natural or man- made fibers into yarns, and for winding.78 71715 Cord treating laboratory (70) 418 SXYZ units (for example, Computrea- tors®), and parts, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 564 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES EASTERN EUROPE JUNE 25 1968-Continued TO Department of Commerce expOrt control commodity No. and corn- modity description . Unit Validated GLV dollar value limits Special provi- sions ]ist* ~ Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* for shipments to country groups* S T V X 422 STVWXYZ 500500 500 500 422 SVWXYZ 500 (77) 422 STVWXYZ 428 SWXYZ 100 B 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 100 B B 100 B PAGENO="0133" 565 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Proc- license for shipments to provi- Unit essing required for country groups* sions No. country groups list~ shown below* S T V X Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description SECTION 7-MACHINERy AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued RoLsIa-G MiLLS AND PARTS-Con. 71730 Industrial sewing machines, (75) 418 SYZ B including complete head assem- blies, specially designed for the pronuction of parachutes or other military equipment; and parts, n.e.c. 71822 Fonts; Linotype® matrices; (75) 218 SYZ B multitype typewriters, justifying and multiple font, for use in pho- tolithography or offset printing (for example, Varitypers®), and parts and accessories; electrotyp- ing, stereotyping, and photo- engraving machines, and parts and accessories, including printing blocks, cylinders, plates and sheets. 71839 Sugar-plant machines and 418 SYZ B equipment, n.e.c., and parts. 71842 Power cranes, draglines, No 408 SWXYZ 100 B shovels, and backhoes, excavator- type, crawler- or walker-mounted, full revolving, over 6 cu. yd. dip- per capacity, or over 100 tons crane lifting capacity. [Report wheel- or truck-mounted machines in No. 73203.] 71842 Parts, accessories, and at- 408 SWXYZ 100 B tachments, except cabs and cab guards (canopy tops), specially designed for nonmilitary, full- revolving excavator-type power cranes, draglines, shovels and backhoes, as follows: (a) walker- or crawler-mounted, over 6 cu. yd. dipper capacity, or over 100 tons crane lifting capacity and (b) wheel- or truck-mounted over 1 cu. yd. capacity or over 30 ton crane lifting capacity. (Specify type and capacity.) 71842 Nonmilitary type scrapers, No 402 SVWXYZ E-11 dig-carry-haul type, over 11 Cu. yd. struck capacity. (Specify struck capacity.) 71842 Parts, accessories, and at- 402 SVW'XYZ 1, 000 E-11 tachments, except cabs and cab guards (canopy tops), specially de- signed for nonmilitary type scrap- ers, dig-carry-haul type, over 11 Cu. yd. struck capacity. (Specify as nonmilitary and Cu. yd. Ca- pacity.) [Report integral tractor- shovel loaders and front-end load- ers for mounting on tractors, and parts and attachments therefor in No. 71931.] 71842 Dredging machines, and (81) 408 SWXYZ 100 B parts, accessories and attach- ments.8° 71842 Rotary drill rigs incorporat- No 402 SVWXYZ ing rotary tables with drawworks designed for an input of 150 horse- power and over. (Specify input horsepower.) [Report truck- mountrings in No. 73203.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0134" 566 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X Special provi sions list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ROLLING MILLS AND PAETS-COn. 71842 Parts, accessories, and at- 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-12 tachments specially designed for rotary drill (excluding core) rigs incorporating rotary tables with drawworks designed for an input of 150 horsepower and over, except core barrels, crown and traveling blocks, hooks, swivel8, drill collars, tool joints, kellies, and kelly and rotary substitutes. [Report derricks in No. 71931.] 71842 Other drilling, excavating, (82) 408 SXYZ 100 B leveling, mining, construction, and maintenance equipment; and parts, accessories, and attach- ments. 71851 Other foundry sand agglorn- 428 SWXYZ 100 B erating, molding, or shaping ma~ chines, and parts, n.e.c. 71851 Other mineral crushing, sort- ($3) 408 SXYZ 100 B ing, washing, mixing, forming and similar machines, and parts, n.e.c. 71852 Standard equipment do- 418 SWXYZ 100 B signed for automatic exhaust sealing and gettering of standard entertainment typo 7-pin mina- ture and 9-pin noval tubes; and specifically designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 71852 Other machines (specify by 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 name), capable of: (a) manufac- turing components for electron tubes, transistors, or crystals diodes; or (b) assembling electron tubes, or components or sub- assemblies therefor; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. [Report machines for as- sembling transistors or crystal diodes in No. 71080.] 71852 Other glass-working ma- 418 SXYZ 100 B chinery, n.e.c.; and machines for assembling electric filament and discharge lamps; and parts, n.e.c. 71911 Other electrolytic cells, n.e.c. 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 (specify by name); and specially designed parts. 71911 Other gas generators, and 418 SXYZ 100 B parts. 71912 Sellcontained air-condition- No 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 ing machines specially designed for military use. [Report parts in No. 71915.] 71912 Other selfcontained air-con- No 418 SXYZ 100 B ditioning machines. [Report parts in No. 71915.] 71913 Oil and gas burners for con- (81) 402 SVWXYZ tinuous combustion controlled re- action type carbon black furnaces; and specially designed parts and attachments. 71913 Other burners for carbon (81) 408 SXYZ 100 B black furnaces; and parts and at- tachments, n.e.c. 71914 Carbon black furnaces, con- (85) 402 SVWXYZ tinuous combustion, controlled re- action type; and specially de- signed parts and attachments. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0135" 567 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d coin- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X Special provi- sions list* SEcTIoN 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT -Continued ROLLING MILLS AND PARTS-Con. 71914 Metal heat-treating nonelec- (83) 408 SWXYZ 100 B tric industrial furnaces or heaters; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71914 Other nonelectric furnaces, (83) 408 SXYZ 100 B ovens~ and kilns; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71915 Commercial refrigeration (88) 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 equipment, mechanically oper- ated, capable of maintaining tem- peratures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.); and specially de- signed parts, n.e.c.87 71915 Parts specially designed for 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 selfcontalned air-conditioning ma- chines designed for military use. 71915 Other refrigeration equip- (88) 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-8 ment specially designed for use of liquefied gases as a coolant, cap- able of creating or maintaining temperatures of below minus 202° F. (minus 130° 0.); and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71915 Aircraft air conditioning sys- (88) 438 SWXYZ and 100 B tems; and parts, n.e.c. Rep. So. Africa 71919 Electron ovens; and parts...... (88) 418 SYZ B 71919 Machines and equipment (88) 418 SWXYZ 100 B specially designed for use at temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° 0.); and specially designed parts, n.e.c.87 71919 Cane and maple sirup eva. 208 SYZ B porators; crop dryers; forage dehydrators; and tobacco curers; and parts. 71919 Sugar mill machines for (88) 418 SYZ B processing by means of a change in temperature (for example, driers, evaporators, sugar extraction cal- orizators and carbonation vats); and parts. 71919 Heat exchangers, oil coolers (83) 438 SWXYZ and 100 B and liquid coolers specially Rep. So. designed for aircraft; and parts. Africa 71919 Equipment specially de- 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 signed for the production of liquid hydrogen and producing 1 ton but less than 13'~ tons per day of gas in liquid form, except equipment for plants not capable of producing mere than 25 percent of their total daily product as extractable gas in liquid form; and specially designed parts. 71919 Other liquid oxygen or liquid 412 ST~ \% XYZ 500 500 nitrogen production equipment, mobile; and specially designed parts. 71919 Equipmentspeciaily designed 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 for use in production of nitric acid of 98 percent or higher concen- tration, or for the concentration of nitrogen tetroxido and/or nitric oxides or mixtures thereof; and specially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0136" 568 SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ROLLING MILLS AND PARTS-Con. 71919 Industrial processing vessels, 418 SWXYZ non-mixing, n.e.c., specially de- signed for use in the following unit operations: (a) solvent processing, (b) fractionating, rectifying and dephlegmatizing, (c) hydrogena- tion, (d) dehydrogenation, (e) isomerization, (f) polymerization, (g) aromatization, (h) alkylation, (i) desulphurization, and (j) ther- maland catalyticcracking, reform- ing or platforming; and specially designed parts and accessories therefor, n.e.c. 71919 Fractionating columns hay- 418 SWXYZ ing, or having provisions for, 25 or more trays; and specially designed parts. 71919 Other fractionating columns, (II) 418 SWXYZ heat exchangers and processing vessels having all flow-contact surfaces made of or lined with any of the following materials: (a) 90 percent or more tantalum, tita- nium, or zirconium either sepa- rately or combined, (b) 50 percent or more cobalt, molybdenum, nickel or tungsten either sepa- rately or combined, (c) 13 percent or more silicon, (d) steel alloys containing more than 3 percent of (i) chromium and molybdenum combined, or (ii) chromium and tungsten cosnbined, or (iii) chro- mium, molybdenum, or tungsten combined, (e) 2.5 percent or more nickel, (f) fluoro and/or silico resins, (g) glass (acid-, heat-, or shock-resistant), (h) ceramics, (i) carbon, (j) graphite, or (Ic) acid! heat resistant cement; and spe- cially designed parts therefor. [Re- port heat exchangers for steam generating power boilers in No. 71120.] 71919 Pulp and paper mill ma- 418 SYZ chines, and rubber processing ma- chines for processing by means of a change in temperature; and parts, n.e.c. 71919 Other machines and equip- 418 SXYZ mont for processing materials by means of a change in temperature, for the special use of an individual industry, except vegetable oil ma- chines and tobacco processing ma- chines; and parts, n.e.c. PuMPs FOR LIQUIDS, AND PARTS 71921 Vertically shafted centrif- (91) 402 STVWXYZ ugal pumps, glandless, hermeti- cally sealed (canned) type or mechanical pressurized sealed type, having all flow contact sur- faces made of or lined with 10 per- cent or more nickel and/or chro- mium and rated at 50 kilowatts or more; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. (Give full specifications.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions list* country groups shown below* S T V X 100 B 100 B 100 B B lOOB 500 PAGENO="0137" 569 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV I dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS, AND PARTS-Continued 71921 Other centrifugal pumps, No 402 STVWXYZ 500 gladless, hermetically-sealed (can- ned) type, having all flow-contact surfacesmade of 10 percent or more chromium or nickel, either sepa- rately or combined. (Identify type and specify metal content in percent.) 71921 Other centrifugal pumps hay- No 402 SVWXYZ either of the following character- istics: (a) designed to deliver at pressures of 1000 psi or over and to operate at temperatures of 350° F. and over; or (b) designed for an internal pumpcase working pres- sure of over 300 psi and a power input greater than 1,000 horse- power. (Give specifications and type pump.) 71921 Other pumps designed to No 402 SVWXYZ deliver at pressures of 1,000 psi and over and to operate at tempera- tures of 350° F. and over. (Specify designed delivery pressure and op- erating temperature.) 71921 Slush (mud) pumps recip- No 402 SVWXYZ rocating type, designed to deliver at pressures of 1,000 psi or over and requiring a drive rated 200 horse- power or over. (Specify delivery pressure and horsepower.) 71921 Oilfield production (bottom No 402 SVWXYZ 500 E-12 hole) pumps. 71921 Other pumps as follows: (a) (91) 408 SWXYZ 100 B centrifugal, designed to operate at speeds of 7,000 rpm or over and to produce pressures of 800 psi or over and having all flow-contact surfaces made of 10 percent or more chrom- ium or nickel, either separately or combined; (b) specially designed for use in the processing of petro- leum, petrochemicals, natural gas, or their fractions; and (c) designed to operate at temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.); and specially designed parts and at- tachments therefor. (Specify op- erating speeds, pressures and temperatures.) 71921 Other pumps having allflow- (91) 408 SWXYZ 100 B contact surfaces made of or lined with any of the following materials: (a) 50 percent or mereniekelortung- sten either separately or com- bined; (b) 13 percent or more sili- con; (c) steel alloys containing more than 3 percent of (i) chrom- ium and molybdenum combined, (ii) chromium and tungsten com- bined, or (iii) chromium, molyb- denum, or tungsten combined; (d) 2.5 percent or more nickel; (a) fiuoro and/or silico resins; (f) glass (acid-, heat-, or shick-resistant); (g) ceramics; (h) carbon; (i) graph- ite; or (j) acid/heat resistant ce- ment; and specially designed parts and attachments therefor. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0138" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS rost LIQUIDs, AND PARTS-Continued 71921 Pumps speciaUy designed for aircraft (fuel, fuel booster, hy- draulic, water, etc.); and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71921 Pump parts and attach- ments wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. 71921 Parts and attachments spe- cially designed for other pumps under No. 71921 which require a validated license to all Country Groups but which are not subject to the Import Certificate/De- livery Verification procedure. 71921 Parts and attachments spe- 402 SVWXYZ cially designed for pumps under No. 71921 which require a vali- dated license to all Country Groups except Country Group T. 71921 Other pumps for liquids, (91) 408 SXYZ and parts and attachments, n.e.c. PUMPS FOR GASES; Am OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND ?ARTS: 71922 Other ion vacuum pumps; (92) 412 and specially designed parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71922 Other diffusion vacuum No 412 pumps, 12 inches in diameter and larger (diameter measured inside the barrel at the inlet jet). 71922 Vacuum pumps, air com- (92)... 439 pressors, fans, and blowers spe- cially designed for aircraft; and parts and attachments therefor. 71922 Other parts and attachments, 412 n.e.c., specially designed for dif- fusion vacuum pumps of 12 inches in diameter or larger (diameter measured inside the barrel at the inlet jet). 71922 Other vacuum pumps, and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71922 Centrifugal and axial flow compressors and blowers capable of: (a) an overall compression ratio of 2:1 or more coupled with a capacity of over 372,000 cubic feet per minute, or (b) an overall com- pression ratio of 3:1 or more cou- pled with a capacity of over 106,000 cubic feet per minute; and spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. 71922 Compressors for other jet, turbo-prop, turbo-shaft, and gas turbine aircraft engines under No. 71142 which are not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Ver- ification procedure. (Specify make, model, and horsepower of engine.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 570 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description : export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special llcense for shipments to provi- required for country groups' sions country groups list' shown below' S P V X (91) 438 SWXYZ and 100 B Rep.So.Africa 402 STVWXYZ 500 100 402 STVWXYZ 500 100 500 100 B STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-9 STVWXYZ 500 E-9 SWXYZ and 100 B Rep. So. Africa. STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-9 (92)_ 418 SYZ B (II)_ 402 STVWXYZ 500 500 (93)_ 432 STVWXYZ 500 E-2 PAGENO="0139" 571 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups - list* shown below* S P V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP. MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71922 Other compressors and blow- (93)___~ 402 SVWXYZ 500 ers capable of receiving a power input greater than 2,000 horse- power and designed for a clis- charge greater than 300 psi; and specially designed parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. (Specify horse- power and discharge pressure.) 71922 Other compressors and blow- (93)_ 408 SWXYZ 100 B ers capable of receiving a power input of 500 but not greater than 2,000 horsepower and specially designed for use in the processing of petroleum, petro-chemicals, natural gas or their fractions; and specially designed parts and at- tachments. (Specify horsepower.) 71922 Other reciproacting corn- (93)_ 408 SWXYZ 100 B pressors over 125 horsepower and all other centrifugal, axial flow and mixed flow compressors and blowers having all flow-contact surfaces made of or lined with any of the following materials: (a) 90 percent or more tantalum, titan- ium, or zirconium either separate- ly or combined; (b) 50 percent or more cobalt, molybdenum, nickel or tungsten either separately or combined; (c) 13 percent or more silicon; (d) steel alloys containing more than 3 percent of (1) chro- mium and molybdenum com- bined, (ii) chromium and tung- sten combined, or (iii) chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten com- bined; (e) 2.5 percent or more nickel; (I) fluoro and/or sllico resins; (g) glass (acid-, heat-, or shock-resistant); (h) ceramics; (i) carbon, (j) graphite; or (k) acid! heat resistant cement; and spe- cially designed parts and attach- ments. 71922 Compressors, refrigeration (93)_ 418 SXYZ 100 B and airconditioning type, over 3/~ horsepower; and parts, n.e.c. 71922 Other compressors, blowers, (93)... 408 SXYZ 100 B and fans; and parts and attach- ments. 71923 Equipment for filtering, pu- 412 STVWXYZ 500 rifying, separating or treating radioactive impurities from nu- clear reactor coolant; and specially designed parts. 71923 Equipment, n.e.c., using the 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 technique of gas chromatography in purifying or separating ma- terials; and specially designed parts. [Report electric or elec- tronic industrial instruments for gas or liquid analysis in No. 72952, and non-electric or -electronic in No. 86198.] 71923 Centrifugal counter-current 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 solvent extractors; and specially designed parts. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0140" 572 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions countrygroups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; Am OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71923 Other centrifuges, power- 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 driven, bowl type, with all prod- uct contact surfaces of aluminum, nickel, or alloy containing 60 per- cent or more nickel; and parts. (Specify by name; and specify kind of metal and, if nickel alloy, state percentage of nickel content.) 71923 Centrifuge bowls, wholly 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 made of or lined with aluminum, nickel, or alloy containing 60 per- cent or more nickel; and parts. (Specify by name and specify kind of metal and, if nickel alloy, state percentage of nickel content.) 71923 Separators and collectors spe- 418 SWXYZ 100 B cially designed for use at tempera- tures below minus 202~ F. (minus 13O~ C.); and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71923 Oil and gas field production 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-J separating, filtering, and purifying equipment (for example, flow splitters, separators, treaters, do- hydrators, scrubbers, absorbers, LACT units, water knockout, etc.); and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71923 Other oil and gas separating 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 equipment; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71923 Petroleum dehydrators, and 412 SVWXYZ 100 petroleum desalters; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71923 Water purifiers, water soft- 408 SXYZ 100 B eners, water filters, and other fil- tering, purifying, and separating machines for water treatment and sewage disposal; and parts, n.e.c. 71923 Filters and filter cartridges 438 SXYZ 100 B or elements for ifitering air or liq- uids on aircraft, motor vehicle, watercraft, and industrial engines; and parts, n.e.c. 71923 Other centrifuges, separa- 418 SXYZ 100 B tow, and other filtering and purifying machines for liquids, air, and gases; and parts, n.e.c. 71931 Nonmilitary type integral (91) 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-11 tractor-shovel loaders, 135 horse- power and over; and specially designed parts and attachments, except cabs and cab guards (canopy tops).73 (Specify as nonmilitary, whether wheel or tracklaying type, and horsepower.) 71931 Equipment, 135 horsepower (93) 408 SWXYZ 100 B ~nd over, as follows: (a) logging vehicles, self-propelled, and (b) pipe layers, integrated track- laying type; and specially de- signed parts, accessories, and attachments, except cabs and cab guards (canopy tops).73 71931 Logging sulkies, and logging (93) 408 SYZ arches, except self-propelled of 135 horsepower or ever; and parts, accessories, and attachments.73 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0141" 573 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control coimnodity No. an rnodity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* - S T V - list* X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71931 Oilfield derricks, platforms, 408 SXYZ 100 B and substructures; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 71931 Other oil and gas field lifting 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-12 equipment, n.e.c.; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name.) [Report well drilling ma- chines and parts in No. 71842, and if truck-mounted in No. 73203; pumps in No. 71921; sepa- rating, filtering, and purifying equipment in No. 71923; valves and valve assemblies in No. 71992; and oil and gas field equip- ment, n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c., in No. 71980.] 71931 Construction jacks, hydrau- 408 SXYZ 100 B lie, 100 tons or over lifting ca- pacity; and parts, n.e.c. 71931 Aircraft winches, hoists, tow 438 SXYZ 100 B bars, pallets, conveyors, and ele- vating platforms; and aircraft cargo handling and loading equip- ment, n.e.c.; and parts and attach- ments, n.e.c. 71931 Other lifting, loading, and (91) 408 SXYZ 100 B handling machines and equip- ment; and parts and attachments, n.e.c.96 71932 Nonmilitary type industrial (97) 402 SVWXYZ 1, 000 E-11 tractors and lift trucks powered by internal combustion engine, 135 horsepower and over; and spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories, except cabs and cab guards (canopy tops).73 (Specify as non- military, whether tractor or lift truck, and horsepower.) 71932 Other industrial trucks, trac- (91) 408 SXYZ 100 B tors and portable elevators of a kind used for moving goods in plants, railway stations, building sites, docks, warehouses, mines, and similar installations; and parts. 71951 Optical curve generators ca- 418 SWXYZ 100 B pable of producing aspherical curves without the use of mating surfaces. 71953 Portable drilling machines, (99) 422 SVWXYZ pneumatic or hydraulic, capable of tapping steel line pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. without interruption of flow; and specially designed parts and attachments, 71954 Other grinding heads and 422 STVWXYZ 500 250 spindle assemblies for grinding machines designed or rated for operation at speeds in excess of 80,000 r.p.m. 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- 422 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 ments, and auxiliary equipment specially designed for other metal- working machines and machine tools (No. 71510) requiring a vali- dated license to all Country Groups but not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Veri- fication procedure. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611: PAGENO="0142" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS: FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- inents, and auxiliary equipment specially designed for other metal- working machines and machine tools (No. 71510) requiring a vail- dated license to all Country Groups except Country Group T. 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- 428 SXYZ ments, and auxiliary equipment forsingle-spindle automatic chuck- ing lathes and single-spindle between-center lathes. 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- 428 SXYZ ments, and auxiliary equipment for (a) bonding machines for applying fins on tubing, and (b) axle straighteners. 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- 428 SWXYZ ments, and auxiliary equipment for other metalworking machines and machine tools (No. 71510). 71954 Parts, accessories, attach- 418 SWXYZ ments, and auxiliary equipment specially designed for optical curve generators capable of producing aspherical curves with- out the use of mating surfaces. 71961 Calendering machines and 418 SYZ similar rolling machines, n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c., as follows: (a) for paper-industries machines,and (b) for rubberworking machines. 71963 Other weighing machines No 218 and scales, n.e.c. 71964 Arc plasma devices of less 412 than 80 kilowatts which utilize or generate a flow of ionized gas for cutting, welding, plating and/or spraying; equipment incorporat- lug such devices; and specially de- signed parts, accessories, and controls, n.e.c. 71964 Aircraft fire extinguishing 438 SXYZ and systems; and parts, n.e.c. [Report Rep. So. fire warning and signalling sys- Afr. tems and instruments in No. 72994.1 - 71964 Foundry blast cleaning ma- 418 SWXYZ chines and other metal cleaning machines; and parts n.e.c. 71966 Signalling and controlling 408 SXYZ equipment, n.e.c., mechanical, not electrically powered, for road, rail, water, or airfield traffic; and parts, n.e.c. 71970 Ball and roller bearings spe- 418 SWXYZ cially designed for service at tern- peratures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.); and specially de. igned parts. (Specify tolerance, type material, and normal operat- ing temperature.) (See § 373.47.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 574 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED -ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued TO Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Unit * ~ Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to countrygroups* S T V X Special provi- sions list° 422 SVWXYZ ~1, 000 100 B 100 B 100 B 100B SYZ B STVwxYZ 500 bOB 100 B 100B 100 B PAGENO="0143" 575 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit easing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups1 sions country groups list* shown below9 S P V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71970 Other ball and cylindrical 418 SWXYZ 100 B roller bearings having tolerances of BEC 5 or closer; and specially designed parts.19 (Specify toler- ance, type material, and normal operating temperature.) (See § 37&47) 71970 Tapered, spherical, or thrust 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-9 roller bearings with inner bore diameter above 400 millimeters (specify type and inner bore di- ameter); and specially designed parts. (See § 373.47.) 71970 Other ball and roller bear- 418 SWXYZ and 100 B ings, aircraft type; and specially Rep. So. designed parts. (See § 373.47.) Africa 71970 Other ball and roller bear- 418 SWXYZ 100 B ings with inner bore diameter 10 mm. and under or 200 mm. and over; and specially designed parts. (Specify inner bore diameter.) (See § 373.47.) 71970 Other ball and roller bear- 418 SXYZ 100 B ings; and parts.99 (Specify inner bore diameter, tolerance, type ma- terial, and normal operating tem- perature.) (See § 373.47.) 71980 Pransonic (Mach 0.8 to 1.4), 412 STVWXYZ supersonic (Mach 1.4 to 5.5), hypersonic (Mach 5.5 to 15), and hypervelocity (above Mach 15) wind tunnels and devices (includ- ing hot-shot tunnels, plasma arc tunnels, shock tubes, shock tun- nels, gas tunnels, and light gas guns) for simulating environ- ments at Mach 0.8 and above; and specially designed parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. [Report instru- ments in No. 72952, 86182, 86191, 86193, 86195, 86196, 86197, or 86198 depending on function and/or principle of operation.] 71980 Metal finishing and coating 428 SWXYZ 100 B machines, n.e.c.; and parts.10° 71980 Other cable-making machin- 422 STVWXYZ 500 500 ery, n.e.c., as follows: (a) machines for applying insulating material to conductors of multipair electric telecommunications cable, (b) machines for laying together con- ductors for multipair telecom- munications cable and/or applying insulating, separating, binding, or identifying material thereto, and (c) machines for laying to- gether conductors (pairs, quads, etc.) to form complete cable core or a part thereof; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0144" 576 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description * export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AiR oa GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLow- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71980 Other machiner machinery, 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 n.e.c. (specify by name), capable of manufacturing or assembling transistors or crystal diodes, or components or subassemblies therefor; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. [Re- port machines for assembling electron tubes in No. 71852.] 71980 Filament winding machines 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 designed for or modified for the manufacture of rigid structural forms by precisely controlled ten- sioning and positioning of fila- ment yarns, tapes, or rovings; and specially designed parts, controls, and accessories, n.e.c.'3 71980 Stenters (tenters) specially 412 STVWXYZ 500 designed for stretching other synthetic film; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. (Give de- tailed specifications of film to be produced.) 71980 Equipment specially do- 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 signed for the zone purification of germanium, and specially de- signed parts, n.e.c. 71980 Other, equipment ,specially 412 STVWXYZ 500 designed to produce electronic assemblies by: (a) automatically inserting and/or soldering compo- nents on insulating panels, plates, or wafers to which wiring is ap- plied by printing or other means, or (b) automatically or semi-auto- matically assembling wiring and/ or packaging mounted modular insulated panels, plates, or wafers (specify by name); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. [Report cameras in No. 86140.] 71980 Processing vessels specially 418 SWXYZ 100 B designed for use at temperatures. below minus 202° F. (minus 130° 0.); and specially designed parts and accessoires, n.e.c. 71980 Other hot or cold isostatic 412 STVWXYZ .500 500 presses; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 71980 Nitrators, batch type, with 418 SWXYZ 100 B capacity of 125 Imperial gallons or more; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0145" 577 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups - shown below* S T V X Special provi- sbus list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PUMPS FOR GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71980 Other processing vessels, 418 SWXYZ 100 B mixing or nonmixing, having all flow-contact surfaces made of or lined with any of the following materials: (a) 90 percent or more tantalum, titanium, or zirconium either separately or combined; (b) 50 percent or more cobalt, molyb- denum, nickel or tungsten either separarely or combined; (c) 13 per- cent or more silicon; (d) steel alloys containing any combination of chromium, with either or both molybdenum or tungsten in which the sum of the alloying elements exceeds 3 percent of the total; (e) 2.5 percent or more nickel; (f) fluoro and/or silico resins; (g) glass (acid-, heat-, or shock-resistant); (h) ceramics; (i) carbon; (j) graphite; or (k) acid/heat resistant cement; asid specially designed parts and acces- sories therefor. 71980 Other machines and mechan- 418 SYZ ical appliances, the following only: abrasive circulators; abrasive coating machines; assembling fix- tures, production, except those for production of military equipment; B RI (Basic Refractories Injec- tion) guns; cordage-making ma- chines; line-traveling coating and wrapping machines for pipes and tubes; Permanent Magnet Ferro Filters®; pipe line cleaning ma- chines; rubber-extruding ma- chines; tire-building machines; tire recapping and repairing machines; rubber processing and rubber products manufacturing machines, n.e.c.; vegetable oilmill machines (other than margarine processing machines); waxing machines, industrial; welding rod brushing machines; and welding rod feeders; and parts therefor. 71980 Watercraft controls, nonelec- 438 SYZ tric (for example, steering equip- ment, exiuding rudders, and re- mote engine controls); and parts, n.e-c. 71980 Oil and gas field production 402 SVWXYZ 1, 000 E-12 equipment, n.e.c. (for example, wire line equipment, wire line blowout preventers, packers, test- ers, perforating equipment ex- cluding bullets or shaped charges, etc.); and parts, accessories, and attachments, n.e.c. 71980 Other machines and mechan- 418 SXYZ 100 B ical appliances, n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c.'3 (See § 399.2, Interpretation 17.) 71991 Other molding boxes and No 428 SWXYZ 100 B molds for metal foundry, exclud- ing ingot molds. [Report ingot molds for heavy steel ingots in No. 71521.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 97-627---68-pt. 2-10 PAGENO="0146" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued PusiPs FOB GASES; AIR OR GAS COMPRESSORS; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71991 Tire molds No 418 SYZ 71991 Other molds No 418 SXYZ 71992 Pipe valves having all of the Lb.'°' - 412 STVWXYZ following characteristics: a pipe size Connection of 8 inches or more inside diameter, all flow contact surfaces made of or lined with alloys of 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium and rated at 1,500 psi or more; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. (Give full specifica- tions.) 71992 Other valves, cocks, or pres- sure regulators of 2-inch diameter (50.8mm.) or less specially design- ed for operation at temperatures from minus 274° F. (minus 170° C.) to minus 328° F. (minus 200° C.); and specially desinged parts. 71992 Valve parts and accessories Lb wholly made of polyvinylfiuoride. 71992 Other valves fitted with Lb.10t bellows seal, and wholly made of or lined with aluminum, nickel, or alloys containing 60 percent or more nickel; and specially design- ed parts. (Give full specifications.) 71992 Other valves, cocks, or pros- Lb.101 sure regulators incorporating 90 percent or more tantalum, tita- nium, or zirconium, either sepa- rately or combined; and specially designed parts. (Give full speci- fications.) 71992 Valves specially designed for Lb.101 412 SVWXYZ temporary stopping off or plug- ging a section of steel line pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d.; and specially designed parts. 71992 Other steel valves with inlet Lb.'°1 412 SVWXYZ or outlet diameter 17 inches or greater and designed for a working pressure of over 300 psi; and specially designed parts. 71992 Mud valves, working pres- Lb.101 406 SVWXYZ sure 600 psi or over, specially designed for rotary drill rigs, except core drill rigs; and specially designed parts. 71992 Valves and valve assembles, 402 SVWXYZ 2,000 psi and over, specially de- signed for oil and gas field pro- duction (for example, wellhead, casinghead and Christmas tree assemblies; inlet, manifold and production headers; hangers, chokes, etc.); and specially de- signed parts, n.e.c. 71992 Other valves and valve as- 408 SXYZ semblies specially designed for oil and gas field production; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 578 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description ~ export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Valldated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X 412 STVWXYZ 500 412 STVWXYZ 500 412 STVWXYZ 500 B bOB 500 Lb.IIL~~ 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 100 100 E-9 100 E-9 100 100 100 E-12 1,000 E-12 100 B PAGENO="0147" 579 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP. MENT-Continued PuMPs FOR GAsEs; AIR OR GAS CoMPREssoRs; FANS AND BLOW- ERS (EXCLUDING HOUSEHOLD FANS), AND PARTS-Continued 71992 Other valves, cocks, or pres- Lb.101 418 SWXYZ 100 B sure regulators having all flow- contact surfaces made of or lined with any of the following materials: (a) 50 percent or more of nickel or tungsten either separately or combined, (b) 13 percent or more silicon, (c) steel alloys containing any combination of chromium, with either or both molybdenum or tungsten in which the sum of the alloying elements exceeds 3 percent of the total, (d) 2.5 percent or more nickel, (e) fluoro and/or silico resins, (f) glass (acid-, heat-, or shock-resistant), (g) ceramics, (h) carbon, (i) graphite, or (j) acid/heat resistant cement; and specially designed parts. (Give full specifications.) 71962 Other valves, cocks, or pros- Lb.'°' 418 SWXYZ 100 B sure regulators: (a) designed to operate at temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.) down to and including minus 274° F. (minus 170° C.), or (b) in- corporating 50 percent or more cobalt or molybdenum, either separately or combined; and specially designed parts. (Give full specifications.) 71992 Other valves, cocks, or pros- Lb.t0I 418 SWXYZ 100 B sure regulators, spacially designed for use in the processing of petrol- eum, petrochemicals, natural gas or their fractions; and specially designed parts. (Give full speci- fications.) 71993 Watercraft power transmission 438 SYZ B equipment (for example, gears, clutches, drives, and propeller shafts); and parts, n.e.c. [Report copper alloy propeller shafting in No. 68221.] 71993 Transmission shafts, cranks, (IM) 418 SXYZ 100 B bearing housings, pulleys, and mechanical power transmission equipment, n.e.c.; and parts. (See § 373.47.) [Report unmounted ball and roller bearings in No. 71970.1 71994 Other gaskets (joints) con- 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-3 taming polyinildes, polybenzimi- dazoles, polyimidazoprrolones, ar- omatic polyamides, polyparaxyl- lenes, polimide-polyamide, polyte- trafluoroethylene, or polychlorotri- fluoroothylene, or wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 71999 Propellers and paddle wheels 438 SYZ 13 for watercraft; and parts, n.e.c. 71999 Other machine parts, n.e.c. 218 SYZ nonelectric. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0148" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPA- RATUS, AND APPLIANCES 1364 72210 Other synchronous motors of any rating having any of the fol- lowing characteristics: (a) syn- chronous speeds in excess of 3,000 rpm, or (b) designed to operate between minus 25° C. and minus 10° C., or between plus 55° C. and plus 100° C. (Specify by name and model number.) 72210 Electric motors, 1 horse- power and over, specially de- signed for metal rolling mills in- cluded under No. 71522 and not identified by the symbol "B" in the last column of the Commodity Control List. (Specify horsepower and type of mill.) 72210 Electric motors, D.C. and (103) A.C., specially designed for air- craft; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. (Specify electrical charac- teristics and horsepower.) 72210 Other electric motors, 12,500 (103) 608 horsepower and over; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. (Specify horsepower, AC. or D.C.) 72210 Servo motors (gear head or (103) plain) designed to operate from power sources over 300 cycles per second up to and not exceeding 400 cycles per second, designed to operate within a temperature range greater than minus 10° C. to plus 55° C. but not exceeding minus 25° C. to plus 100° C. (specify by name and model num- ber); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 72210 Other servo motors; and (103) parts and accessories, n.e.c. 72210 Parts and accessories spa- cially designed for motors under No. 72210 which require a vali- dated license to all Country Groups but are not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Veri- fication procedure. (Specify model number and characteristics of motor.) 72210 Parts and accessories spa- cially designed for motors under No. 72210 for which a validated license is required to all Country Groups except Country Group T. (Specify model number and characteristics of motor.) 72210 Electrical power equipment (104) specially designed for aircraft (for example, generators, regula- tors, rectifiers, converters, in- verters, magnetic amplifiers, transformers, etc.) (specify by name); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 72210 Other turbine-generator sets (104) specially designed for use of satu- rated steam; and parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. (Specify name, type, and rating.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 438 SWXYZ and Rep. So. Africa. SWXYZ 608 SWXYZ 100 B 602 STVWXYZ 500 500 580 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions countrygroups shown below* S T V X list* No 602 STVWXYZ No 602 SVWXYZ 500 100......_.. E-6 bOB 100B 602 STVWXYZ 500 100 602 SVWXYZ 500 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-2 602 STVWXYZ 500 PAGENO="0149" 581 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 64-Con. 72210 Other generators and gen- (104) 608 SWXYZ 100 B erator sets of 38 kilowatt or over; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. (Specify name, type, and rating.) 72210 Other electronic transform- (105) 618 SWXYZ - 100 B ers; and other electronic coils, reactors, and chokes made of magnetic materials (specify by name and type number); and parts, n.e.c. 72210 Fluorescent ballasts No 218 SYZ B 72210 Other motors, generators, (104) 608 SXYZ 100 B generating sets, rotating con- verters, transformers, limiting re- actors, regulators, nonrotating rectifiers and power supplies; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. 72220 Motor controls specially de- 602 STVWZXY 500 500 signed for motors under No. 72210 which require a validated license to all Country Groups but are not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Verification procedure; and specially designed parts and accessories. (Specify by name and model number of motor.) 72220 Motor controls specially de- 602 SVWXYZ 500 E-6 signed for motors under No. 72210 which require a validated license to all Country Groups except Country Group T; and parts and accessories. (Specify by names and model number of motor.) 72220 Motor controls specially do- 608 SWXYZ 100 B signed for other electric motors of 12,500 horsepower or over; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. 72220 Electrical control equipment 438 SXYZ 100 B for motors and generators for rail- way equipment; and parts, n.e.c. 7220 Other electronic resistors and 618 SXYZ 100 B potentiometers; and parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name and type num- ber.)'3 72220 Other waveguide switches 618 SWXYZ 100 B designed for frequencies over 600 megacycles; and parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name and type num- ber.) 72220 Other electronic and micro- 618 SXYZ 100 B wave switches and electronic re- lays, n.e.c.; and parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name and type num- ber.) 72220 Fuses, dimmer switches, 438 SXYZ and 100 B lighting switches, power relays, Rep. So. and other electrical apparatus for Africa. making, breaking or protecting electrical circuits on aircraft; and parts, n.e.c. 72220 Other electrical apparatus for (105)_ 608 SXYZ 100 B making, breaking or protecting electrical circuits, and other cur- rent carrying wiring devices; and parts. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0150" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES ~ 64-Con. 72310 Wire and cable coated with or insulated with polyvinyl fluoride. (Specify type of metal and insula- tion.) (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.49.) 100 72310 Other coaxial cable. (Also Lb specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.49.) 72310 Other communications cable containing more than one pair of conductors and containing any conductor, single or stranded, ex- ceeding 0.9 icon, in diameter. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.49.) 72310 Insulated nickel wire of alloys composed of 50 percent or more copper, and alloys of chief weight copper, irrespective of nickel con- tent. (Also specify copper content in pounds.) (See § 373.49.) 72310 Insulated nickel or nickel alloy wire as follows: (a) insulated thermocouple nickel-chrome wire containing less than 95 percent nickel and within a diameterrange of 0.2 mm. to 5mm. both inclusive, or (b) other insulated nickel or nickel alloy wire containing 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel-copper alloy wire containing not more than 6 percent of other alloying elements. (Specify kind of wire or cable, give complete metal analysis, and type of insulation.) 72310 Other insulated niobium Lb (columbium) or niobium alloy wire. 72310 Insulatedtungstenwire made Lb from pressed-sintered tungsten. 72310 Other copper or copper-base Lb alloy insulated wire and cable. (Also specify copper~ content in pounds.) (See § 373.49.) 101 72310 Ignition harness and cable sets, aircraft type. 72310 Other Insulated wire and cable, n.e.c.10° 72320 Other electrical insulators and fittings containing polyi- mides, polybenzimadazoles, poly- imidazopyrrolones, aromaticpoly- amides, polyparaxylylenes, poly- amide, fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, except polyvinyl fluo- ride, or wholly made of polyvinyl fluoride. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 582 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued . Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- lions list* country groups shown below* S T V X Lb 262 STVWXYZ 250 100 PG 272 STVWXYZ 250 100 PG Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 272 STVWXYZ Lb 262 STVWXYZ 250 100 PG 250 250 500 100 E-8 500 100 E-8 500 100 E-8 250 250 PG 262 STVWXYZ 262 STVWXYZ 272 STVWXYZ 438 SWXYZ and 100 B Rep. So. Africa. Lb 268 SXYZ 100 B Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 E-3 PAGENO="0151" 583 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 °°-Con. 72491 Other equipment designed to 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 ensure the privacy or secrecy of communications, except voice transmission systems making use of fixed frequency inversions and/or fixed band scrambling techniques in which the changes occur no more frequently than once every ten sec- onds; and specialized components, assemblies, and subassemblies, parts, and accessories. (Specify by name.)'3 72491 Terminal and intermediate 618 SWXYZ 100 B repeater or amplifier equipment as follows: (a) terminal and inter- mediate repreater or amplifier equipment designed to transmit, carry, or receive frequencies from higher than 16 kilocycles up to and including 150 kilocycles, and (b) terminal equipment specially de- signed for power lines and operat- ing within the range of frequencies from 16 to 1,500 kiocycles (specify by name and model number); and specialized components, parts, and accessories, n.e.c. (specify by name).'3 72491 Other telegraph apparatus as (107) 612 STVWXYZ 500 100 follows: (a) suitable for use at speeds greater than 200 words per minute or 150 bauds, or (b) other multi-channel telegraph terminal transmitting and receiving equip- ment (specify by name and model number); and specialized compo- ments, parts, and accessories, n.e.c.'3 72491 Other telephone and tele- (107) 618 SXYZ 100 B graph equipment, n.e.c.; and parts and accessories. (Specify by name.) 13 72492 Telephone repeater equip- 618 SWXYZ 100 B ment designed for frequencies from higher than 16 kilocycles up to and including 150 kilocycles (specify by name and model num- ber); and specialized components, parts, and accessories, n.e.c. (spe- cify by name).'3 72492 Other telephone repeater 618 SXYZ 100 B equipment (specify by name and model number); and components, parts, and accessories (specify by name).'3 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0152" 584 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description Validated GLV dollar value limits Special export Proc- license for shipments to provi- com- Unit essing required for country groups* sions No. country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 64-Con. 72499 Other transmitters or trans- (103) 612 STVWXYZ. 1,000 1,000 ceivers having any of thefollowing characteristics: (a) more than 20 channels, (b) special facilities for interconnection with land line telephone circuits or switch boards, (c) frequency-modulated or amplitude-modulated commu- nications equipment operating in the 420 to 470 megacycles band, with a power output of 25 watts or less for mobile units and 100 watts watts or less for fixed units, (d) amplitude-modulated radio-tele- phone equipment used for search and rescue work operating on a frequency of 243 megacycles with a carrier power of 100 milliwatts or less, (e) designed to operate at out- put carrier frequencies between 108 and 156 or from 223 up to and including 235 megacycles, or (f) designed to provide a multiplicity of alternative output frequencies controlled by a lesser number of piezo-electric crystals, except those forming multiples of a common con- trol frequency (specify by name and model number); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. (specify by name).'3 72499 Other multi-channel radio- (108) 612 STSTWXYZ 500 100 telegraph terminal transmitting and receiving equipment; and other radio-telegraph equipment suitable for use at speeds greater than 200 words per minute or 150 bauds (specify by name and model number); and specialized components, parts and acces- sories, n.e.c.13 72499 Other radio relay communi- 612 STVWXYZ 1, 000 1,000 cations equipment designed for frequencies of 470 megacycles and under (specify by name and model number); and specially designed components, sub-assemblies, parts and accessories, n.e.c. (specify by name).'3 72499 Other equipment designed 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 to ensure the privacy or secrecy of communications, except voice transmission systems making use of fixed frequency inversions and/or fixed bassd scrambling techniques in which the changes occur `no more frequently than once every ten see- ends; and specialized components, assemblies, and subassemblies, parts, and accessories. (Specify by name.) 13 72499 Other panoramic adaptors 612 STVWXYZ 500 253 for commercial radio receivers (specify by name and type num- ber); and specially designed parts and accessories (specify by name). See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0153" 585 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control conTunodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below* S T V X Special provi- sions list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 `4-Con 72499 Other ground and marine 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 radar equipment, including spe- cialized training or simulating equipment, except normal equip- ment designed for pulse operation at frequencies between 1,300 mega- cycles and 1,660 megacycles, 2,700 megacycles and 3,900 megacycles, or 8,500 megacycles and 10,000 mega- cycles, having in the case of marine radar, a peak output power to the aerial system of not greater than 75 kilowatts or, in the case of ground base radar, having a peak output power to the aerial system of not greater than 50 kilowatts and a range of not greater than 50 nautical miles (specify by name and model num- ber); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. (specify by name).'3 72499 Other airborne electronic 012 STVWXYZ 500 100 navigation and direction finding equipment, n.e.c., except direction finders operating at frequencies of S snegacycles or less (specify by name and model number); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. (specify by name).'3 72499 Radio and television broad- 618 SXYZ 100 B cast audio equipment; and tele- vision broadcast studio equip- ment; and parts and accessories (specify by name). [Report video- tape recorders in No. 89111.] 72499 Other flexible waveguides 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 and components designed for frequencies up to and including 12,500 megacycles. (Specify by name and typo number.) 13 72499 Other electronic telecommu- (109) 618 SWXYZ 100 B nications equipment, electronic navigational aids and electronic search and detection apparatus, including radar, n.e.c. (specify by name and model number); and parts and accessories, n.e.c. (spe- cify by name).'3 72501 Condensers for domestic re- No 218 SXYZ 100 B frigerators and food freezers. 72505 Electron ovens; and specially (110) 418 SYZ B designed parts. 72505 Electric steam cabinets for (130) 218 SXYZ 100 B turkish baths; deodorizers; face and hand dryers; and RA Grid heater plates; and parts. 72620 Betatrons, X-ray producing 622 STVWXYZ 500 72620 Parts specially designed for 622 STVWXYZ 500 500 X-ray producing betatrons. 72620 X-ray diffraction tubes and 628 SWXYZ 100 B valves, X-ray diffraction units, and X-ray goniometers; and spe- cially designed parts. (Specify by name.) [Report X-ray powder cameras in No. 86140.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0154" 586 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED EASTERN ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STAT EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued ES TO Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- modity description Unit Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S T V X Special provi- sions list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 `4-Con. 72620 Industrial beta, gamma, and 418 SWXYZ 100 B X-ray equipment capable of meas- uring and/or controlling the di- mensions of a rolled product (in- cluding coating) during its pro- duction (specify by name); and specially designed parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. 72620 Other industrial and scienti- 628 SXYZ 100 B fib X-ray equipment; and parts, n.e.c. 72911 Electro-chemical and radio- (111) 601 STVWXYZ 500 100 A active devices for the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy, having any of the follow- ing characteristics: (a) fuel cells, including regenerative cells, (i.e., cells for generating electric power, to which all the consumable com- ponents are supplied from outside the cells), (b) primary cells pos- sessing a means of activation and having an open circuit storage life in the unactivated condition, at a temperature of 70° F. (21° C.), of 10 years or more, (c) primary cells capable of operating at tempera- tures from below minus 13° F. (minus 25° 0.) to above plus 131° F. (plus 55° 0.), including cells and cell assemblies (other than dry cells) possessing self-contained heaters, or (d) power sources other than nuclear reactors based on ra- dioactive materials systems, ex- cept those having a power output of less than 0.5 watts in which the ratio of output (in watts) to weight (in pounds) is less than ito 2; and spe- cialized parts, components, and subassemblies therefor. (Specify by name and type.) 13 72911 Other primary batteries and (111) 218 SYZ B cells; and parts. 72912 Electrically rechargeable stor- (111) 602 STVWXYZ 500 100 age cells, hermetically sealed, de- signed to have a leakage rate of 10-5 cubic centimeters per second of gas or less when tested under pressure differential of 2 atmos- pheres; and specialized parts, com- ponents and subassemblies there- for. (Specify by name and type.)" 72912 Other storage batteries, (111) 608 SXYZ 100 B n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c.13 72920 Photomicrographic arc No 212 STWVXYZ 500 25 lamps specially designed for use with photographic micro-flash equipment capable of giving a flash of between 1/100,000 and 1/200,000 second duration at a minimum recurrence frequency of 200 flashes per second.'3 72920 Single coil tungsten fila- (112) 218 SWXYZ 100 B ments; and photomicrographic arc lamps specially designed for use with other high speed cam- eras capable of recording at rates in excess of 2,000 frames per sec- ond. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611; PAGENO="0155" Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S P V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, APPARA- TUS, AND APPLIANCES 13 ~ 72920 Other electric lamps (bulbs and tubes); and parts. [Report carbons in No. 72996, and glass envelopes in No. 66492.] ELECTRON TUaES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS [Report X-ray tubes In No. 72620] 13 72930 Other cathode ray tubes con- taining fused fiber optic plates in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 mi- crons. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other cathode ray tubes with screen afterglow longer than ~ second; and other alpha-numeric and similar data or information display tubes In which the dis- played position of each character is fixed. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Color television picture tubes with three or more electron guns. (Specify by name and typo number.) 72930 Other cathode ray tubes n.e.c. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 CommercIal standard televi- lion broadcasting camera tubes. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other television camera tubes. (Specify by name and typo number.) 72930 Photomultiplier tubes hav- ing all of the following character- istics: (a) dark current plus noise less than 5 times 10-16 amperes per square centimeter of active cath- ode surface, (b) sensitivity exceed- ing 65 microamperes per lumen, and (c) an overall gain exceeding 100 million. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other photomultiplier tubes and photo tubes, n.e.c., except those listed in § 399.2, Interpretation 13. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other cold cathode tubes operating in a manner similar to a spark gap, containing three or more electrodes and rated for a peak anode current of 30 amperes or more. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other hydrogen thyratrons. (Specify by name and type num- ber.) 587 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued (113) 218 SYZ No 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 No 618 SWXYZ 100 B No 618 SWXYZ 100 B No 618 SXYZ 100 B No 618 SWXYZ 100 B No 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 No 612 STVWXYZ 500 50 No 618 SWXYZ 100 No 612 STVWXYZ No 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0156" 588 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 26, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc cam- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X 500 250 100 B SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLD STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72930 Other TR and anti-TR No 612 STVWXYZ tubes, n.e.c. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Electron tubes as follows: No 618 SWXYZ (a) tubes rated for operation at frequencies between 250 and 1,000 megacycles, except single-ended glass envelope standard 7-pin minia- ture or 9-pin novel base tubes having a basic tube type nssmber consisting of a one- ortwo-digit number followed by one or two letters, followed by a single digit (for example, 1 S4 6C4, 12X4, 12d U7), (b) indirectly heated tubes having a diameter from 0.283 through 0.5 inch, or (c) tubes designed to withstand ac- coloration of 450 g up to and in- cluding 1,000 g. (Specify by name and typo number.) 72930 Rectifier bulbs for auto- No 618 SXYZ 100 B motive battery chargers, propor- tional counter tubes, and electron tube types described or listed in § 399.2, Interpretation 13. (Specify by name and type number.) 72930 Other electron tubes, n.e.c., No 612 STVWXYZ . 500 250 including military versions of types described or listed in § 399.2, Interpretation 13. (Specify by name and typo number.) 72930 Parts and accessories special- 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 ly designed for electron tubes un- der No. 72930 which require a validated license to all Country Groups but are not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Veri- fication procedure. (Specify by name.) . 72930 Parts and accessories spe- 618 SWXYZ 100 B cially designed for electron tubes under No. 72930 which require a validated license to all Country Groups except Country Groups P and V. (Specify by name.) 72930 Other parts and accessories 618 SXYZ 100 B for electron tubes. (Specify by name.) 72930 Other solar cells and photo- No 618 SWXYZ 100 B sensitive semiconductor devices, n.e.c. (Specify by name and typo number.) 72930 Selenium, copper oxide, and No 618 SXYZ . 100 B magnesium copper sulfide diodes, rectifiers, stacks, or cells, n.e.c. (Specify by type number.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0157" 589 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits license for shipments to required for country groups* country groups shown below4 S T V X Special provi- sions list4 SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72930 Semiconductor diodes, as No 618 SWXYZ 100 B follows: (a) germanium point contact diodes designed for op- eration at frequencies below 250 megacycles, (b) germanium junction diodes designed for op- eration at frequencies of 50 mega- cycles or less and not designed for switching speeds (repetition fre- quency) greater than 1 megacycle, (c) silicon regulator (zener) diodes, and (d) silicon junction power diodes and gate contro~lled recti- fiers (not including radio frequen- cy or switching diodes) having a rated maximum recurrent reverse voltage of 1,000 volts per junction or less. (Specify by type number.) 72930 Transistors listed in § 399.2, No 618 SWXYZ 100 B Interpretation 18. (Specify by type number.) 72930 All other transistors, diodes, No 612 STVWXYZ 500 100 and solid state semiconductor devices. (Specify by name and type number.) 13 72930 Parts and accessories spe- 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 cially designed for solid state semi- conductor devices under No. 72930 which require a validated license to all Country Groups but are not subhect to the Import Certificate/Delivery Verification procedure. (Specify by name.) 72930 Other parts and accessories 618 SWXYZ 100 B for solid state semiconductor de- vices under No. 72930. (Specify by name.) 72941 Electrical starting and igni- (114) 438 SWXYZ and 100 B tion equipment, aircraft type, and Rep. So. specially designed parts, except Africa. spark plugs and parts.13 72952 Other instruments specially No 602 STVWXYZ .500 100 designed for the automatic testing and sorting of electronic compo- nents (including magnetic cores) with respect to their electrical characteristics. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Other cathode ray oscillo- No 602 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 scopes (oscillographs) having any of the following characteristics: (a) an amplifier bandwidth greater than 12 megacycles per second, (b) a time baseless than 0.04 micro- seconds per centimeter, (c) em- ploying accelerating potentials in excess of 5 kilovolts, (d) con- taining or designed for use of three or more cathode ray tubes, or (e) including any device which in- creases the capabilities of the oscilloscope to enable it to meet specifications (a) or (b) of this entry. (Specify by name and model number.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0158" No 602 STV~XYZ ~ 1,000 1,000 No 602 STVWXYZ 1 000 1 000 100 B 1,000 1,000 E-2 590 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and inodity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72952 Other cathode ray oscillo- No 608 SWXYZ 100 B scopes (oscillographs) having any of the following characteristics: (a) a bandwidth greater than 5 megacycles (defined as the band of freqencies over which the loss does not exceed 3 decibels), or (b) a time base shorter than 0.05 microseconds per centimeter. 72952 Other electronic devices for No 602 STVWXYZ 500 100 stroboscopic analysis of a signal (i.e., sampling devices), whether subassemblies or separate units designed to be used in conjunction with an oscilloscope to permit the analysis of recurring phe- nomena which increase the capa- bilities of an oscilloscope to permit measurement above 1&, up to and including 30, megacycles per second. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Instruments, n.e.c., designed for operation at frequencies from 300 megacycles up to and includ- ing 1,000 megacycles. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Other measuring, calibrat- ing, counting, and time interval measuring equipment with any of the following characteristics: (a) frequency measuring instru- ments having an accuracy better than 0.00001 percent, (b) capable of resolving (at normal input levels) successive input signals with less than 0.5 microsecond time difference (including time S . .~:: ;. interval measuring equipment .. . . .. . S. containing such counters), or (c) . *. designed to provide a multiplicity .. . ... . .~ of alternative Out-put frOquencies . . . . 5~ . . . S.. controlled by a lesser number of piezo-electric crystals or an in- ternal or external frequency .* . . standard and not forming multi- . is ples of a common control fre- . ... . .. quency. (Specify by name and model number.) . . 72952 Voltmeters, with a full scale No 602 SPVWXYZ 500 500 sensitivity of 10 nanovolts or less. 72952 Waveform analyzing and/or No 608 SWXYZ 100 B testing instruments operating at frequencies of 300 megacycles per second or less. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Radio testing instruments or No 608 SWXYZ apparatus, n.e.c.; digital volt- meters; and electrometers capable ofmeasuring currents smaller than 0.01 microamperes. 72952 Electrical quantity measur- No 432 STVWXYZ ing and indicating instruments specially designed for aircraft (for example, current and voltage meters, phase meters, frequency meters, etc.). See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0159" SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72952 Aircraftinstruments formeas- uring, indicating or controlling nonelectrical quantities by electri- cal or electronic means (for example, transducers, generators, indicators, regulators or con- trollers for pressure, level, vacuum, flow, temperature, rota- tive speed, vibration, etc.). 72952 Other instruments for meas- No 608 SXYZ uring, indicating, recording, con- trolling, or testing electrical or electronic quantities or charac- teristics, n.e.c. 72952 Nuclear radiation detection No and measuring instruments de- signed to measure neutron flux in connection with the determina- tion of the power level of an operating nuclear reactor.115 72952 Nuclear radiation dosimeters No capable of measuring dosages between 5 and 15 roentgens or over 500 roentgens in one exposure.111 72952 Other nuclear radiation do- simeters capable of measuring dosages above 5 roentgens in one exposure.115 72952 Other nuclear radiation de- No 628 SXYZ tection and measuring instru- ments and appratus. 72952 Other underwater detection No 618 SWXYZ apparatus, n.e.c. (Specify by name and model number.) 13 72952 Electronic closed .loop feed No 422 STVWXYZ back control systems for metal- working machine tools, designed solely for positioning operations. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 7.) 72952 Combination balancing and No 422 STVWXYZ correcting machines designed for or equipped with electronic closed loop control systems designed solely for positioning operations. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 7.) 72952 Other balancing machines or No 428 SWXYZ balancing andcorrecting machines for balancing metal parts stati- cally, dynamically or both. 72952 Other electronic industrial process co~trOl systems. (Specify by name.) 72952 Well-logging instruments and equipment. 72952 Other seismic or seismograph equipment, except observatory type and subsurface engineering type. (Specify by name.) [Report grav- ity meters in No. 86191.] 72952 Other geophysical and mm- No 408 SXYZ eral prospecting equipment. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 591 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* 622 STVWXYZ 622 STVWXYZ No 622 STVWXYZ No 432 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-2 100 B 500 1,000 1,000 500 500 bOB bOB 500 100 500 100 B No 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-12 No 402 STVWXYZ 500 100 100 B PAGENO="0160" 592 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 2~, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- snodity description Unit Validated Proc- license essing required for No. country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S T V X Special provi- sions list~ SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72952 Chemical analysis equip- No 418 SWXYZ 100 B ment, qualitative and quantita- tive (chemical analytical equip- ment utilizing chemical and/or physical separation analytical principles). (Specify by name.) [Report production scale purify- ing and separating units in No. 71923.] 72952 Instruments or devices capa- No 418 SWXYZ 100 B ble of controlling the dimensions of a rolled product during its pro- duction. (Specify by name.) [Re- port indu~trial x-ray equipment inNo. 72620.] 72952 Other vacuum gauges, ion- No 412 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-9 ization type. 72952 Other precision gyroscopes, 432 STVWXYZ 500 100 including rate and integrating gyros. (Specify by name and model or type number.) 72952 Other gyro compasses.13 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 (Specify by name and model num- ber.) 72952 Other aircraft flight and 438 SWXYZ and 100 B navigation instruments, electri- Rep. So. cally or electronically operated.13 Africa (Specify by name and model num- ber.) 72952 Other centrifugal-action test- No 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 ing equipment. (Specify by name.) 72952 Gear testers designed for the No 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-9 testing of gears of diametral pitch finer than 48. (See § 399.2, Inter- pretation 3.) 72952 Testing devices specially de- No 412 STVWXYZ 500 signed for testing electronic assem- blies produced by: (a) automat- ically inserting and/or soldering components on insulating panels, plates or wafers to which wiring is applied by printing or other means, or (b) automatically or semi-automatically assembling, wiring and/or packaging mounted modular insulated panels, plates or wafers. 72952 Vibration testing equipment No 412 STVWXYZ 500 500 capable of providing a thrust of 2,000 pounds or less. 72952 Control equipment specially No 412 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 designed for hot or cold isostatic presses (No. 71980) requiring a validated license to all Country Groups but not subject to the Im- port Certificate/Delivery Verifi- cation procedure. [Report non- electric control equipment in No. 86197.] 72952 Control equipment specially No 422 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 designed for other presses (No. 71510) requiring a validated license to all Country Groups but not subject to the Import Certificate/ Delivery Verification procedure. [Report nonelectric control equip- ment in No. 71954.] See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0161" 593 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72952 Electricalmeasuring and con- No 412 STVWXYZ trolling instluments and appara- tus, n.e.c., specially designed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hypervelocity wind tunnels and devices for sim- ulating environments at Mach 0.8 and above. 72952 Industrial instruments (in- No 412 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-9 cluding sensing elements) capable of operation at, or performing tests at, temperatures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.). 72952 Other industrial process in- No 418 SWXYZ 100 B dicating, recording and/or con- trolling instruments containing one or more electron components (incorporating one or more elec- tron tubes or transistors), except large case potentiometric instru- ments (that is, those with one face dimension 6 inches or larger). (Spec- ify by name.) 72952 Test benches, electric or elec- No 438 SXYZ 100 B tronic, for aircraft systems and components. 72952 Other time interval measur- No 602 STVWXYZ .500 100 ing equipment having one or both of the following characteristics: (a) capable of measuring time in- tervals of 0.1 second or less with an error not exceeding 1 microsecond plus 0.001 percent of the interval measured, and (b) incorporating counting circuits capable of count- ing at rates in excess of 1 megacycle per second. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Other mass spectrographs No 622 STVWXYZ 500 F G and mass spectrometers, except mass spectrometer type leak de- tectors. (Specify by name and model number.) 72952 Electrophotometers, spectro- No 628 SWX YZ 100 B graphs, spectrophotometers, den- sitometers, microphotometers and other spectrum measuring instru- ments, optical. 72952 Other research laboratory in- No 622 STVWXYZ 500 100 struments and apparatus capable of maintaining an ambient tem- perature below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.). (Specify by name.) 72952 0 ther electric or electronic No 628 SXYZ 100 B labora tory and scientific instru- ments for indicating, measuring, testing, inspecting or controlling nonelectrical quantities. 72952 Other physical properties No 418 SWXYZ 100 B testing and products testing and inspecting machines or equipment n.e.c., incorporating circuitry de- signed to use two or more electron tubes or transistors. (Specify by name.) 72952 Flame detectors for indus- No 418 SXYZ 100 B trial and domestic furnaces. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 97-627 0-68-pt. 2-11 PAGENO="0162" 594 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export d corn- Unit Proc- essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTs-Continued 72952 Other electric or electronic No 418 SYZ instruments for Indicating, meas- uring, testing, inspecting or con- trolling nonelectrical quantities. 72970 Belt-type electro-static gene- No 602 STVWXYZ 500 rators (Van De Graaff® ma- chines). 72970 Parts specially designed for 602 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-6 belt-type electrostatic generators (Van De Graafl® machines). 72970 Neutron generators employ- No 622 STVWXYZ 500 FG ing the electrostatic acceleration of ions. 72970 Accelerators, as follows: (a) No 622 STVWXYZ 500 betatrons, synchrotrons, cyclo- trons, synchrocyclotrons and lin- ear accelerators, (b) electron ac- celerators capable of imparting energies in excess of 500,000 elec- tron volts, and (c) other electro- nuclear machines capable of im- parting energies in excess of 1,000,- 000 electron volts to a nuclear par- ticle or ion. 72970 Parts specially designed for 622 STVWXYZ 500 500 FG neutron generators employing the electrostatic acceleration of ions. 72970 Parts specially designed for 622 STVWXYZ 500 25 electronuclear machines capable of Imparting energies in excess of 1,000,000 electron volts to a nuclear particle or ion. 72970 Other parts specially design- 622 STVWXYZ 500 500 ed for betatrons, synchrotrons, cy- clotrons, syncbrocyclotrons, elec- tron accelerators capable of im- parting energies in excess of 500,000 electron volts and other linear ac- celerators. 72970 Other electron and proton 628 SXYZ 100 B accelerators; and parts. 72991 Magnets specially designed 622 STVWXYZ 500 25 for electronuclear machines capa- ble of imparting energies in excess of 1,000,000 electron volts to a nu- clear particle or ion. 72991 Other electro-magnetic and 428 SWXYZ 100 B permanent magnet chucks, clamps, vices and similar work holders for metalworking ma- chines and machine tools. 72991 Other permanent magnets, (116) 268 SXYZ 100 B electro-magnets and electro-mag- netic appliances. 72992 Electric furnaces specially No 412 STVWXYZ 500 designed for the production or pocessing of vapor deposited (pyrolytic) graphite or doped graphites whether as standing bodies, coatings, linings, or sub- strates. (Specify by name and characteristics.) 72992 Other electric industrial No 412 STVWXYZ 500 melting, refining, and metal heat- heating furnaces. (Specify by name and characteristics.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0163" 595 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TUBES AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVICES, AND PARTS-Continued 72992 Other parts, accessories, and 412 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 attachments for furnaces under No. 72992 which require a vali- dated license to all Country Groups but are not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Veri- fication procedure. (Specify by name and type of furnace.) 72992 Electric arc devices of less (117) 412 STVWXYZ 500 than 80 kilowatts which utilize or generate a flow of ionized gas for cutting, welding, plating and/ or spraying; equipment in- corporating such devices; and specially designed parts, acces- sories, and controls, n.e.c. 72992 Automatic pipe welding No 412 SVWXYZ machines capable of welding the joints of steel pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. 72992 Partsand accessories special- 412 SVWXYZ 1,000 ly designed for automatic pipe welding machines capable of welding the joints of steel line pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. 72992 Other electric furnaces, (117) 418 SXYZ 100 B ovens, electric induction and dielectric heating equipment, and electric welding machines; and parts, accessories, and attach- ments; n.e.c. [Report expendable welding electrodes in No. 69887.1 72993 Railway traffic control 438 SXYZ 190 B equipment; and parts. (Specify by name.) 72993 Other electric traffic control 608 SXYZ 100 B equipment; and parts. 72994 Aircraft alarm, warning, and 438 SWXYZ and 100 B signalling instruments, n.e.c. (for Rep. So. example, fire detectors and Africa indicators; engine failure in- dicators; wheel, flap, cowl flap, and control position indicators, etc.); and flashing, intermittent, and rotating lights; and parts. 72994 Other electric lighting signal 608 SXYZ 100 B apparatus, n.e.c.; and other electric and electronic alarm and signal systems, including sound signal equipment, n.e.c.; and parts, n.e.c. 72995 Sintered electrolytic tanta- (118) 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 lum capacitors having a casing made of epoxy resin or sealed with epoxy resin; and specially de- signed parts. (Specify by name and type number.) 72995 Other tantalum electrolytic (118) 618 SWXYZ 100 B capacitors; and parts. (Specify by name and type number.) 72995 Other capacitors for elec- (118) 618 SXYZ 100 B tronic applications; and parts. (Specify by name and type num- ber.) 72995 Ignition capacitors (condens- (118) 438 SWXYZ and 100 B ers) designed for aircraft, and Rep. So. parts. Africa. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0164" 596 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued ELECTRON TuBEs AND SOLID STATE SEMI-CONDUCTOR DEVIcEs, AND PARTs-Continued 72996 Other articles for electrical (119) 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 purposes, made of carbon or graphite fibers, any form (includ- ing chopped or macerated) wheth- er or not coated or impregnated.'3 72996 Other pyrolytic graphite (119) 212 STVWXYZ 500 500 E-8 electrical carbons. 72996 Other electrical carbons, cx- (119) 212 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-8 cept carboa brushes, artificial graphite, smallest dimension 2 Inches or over. (Specify size and boron content In parts per mil- lion.) 72996 Other electrical carbons, 218 SYZ B n.e.c. [Report articles of carbon or graphite for other than elec- trical purposes In No. 66363.1 Electronic and electrical parts of machinery and appliances, n.e.c.: 72998 Other quartz crystals, 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 mounted. (Specify by name and type number.) [Report un- mounted in No. 66700.] 72998 Other modular insulator 612 STVWXYZ 500 250 panels (including wafers) mount- ing single or multiple electronic elements. 72998 Parts and components fab- 612 STVWXYZ 500 100 ricated of berylliumoxlde ceramic. (Specify by name.) 72998 Other electronic compo- 612 STVWXYZ 500 500 nents, n.e.c., designed to operate over the range of ambient tem- peratures from below minus 49° F. (minus 45° 0.) to above plus 212° F. (plus 100° C.) or at ambi- ent temperatures of 392° F. (200° C.) or higher; and specially fabri- cated parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name and type number.) 72998 Other electronic compo- 618 SWXYZ 100 B nents and parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name.) 72998 Other electrical components 608 SXYZ 100 B and parts, n.e.c. 72999 Other signal generators oper- (III) 602 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 ating at frequencies of 300 mega- cycles and over; and specially de- signed parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 72999 Other servo control units 602 STVWXYZ 500 500 linear induction potentiometers, induction rate generators, syn- chros and resolvers; and instru- ments which perform functions simllar to synchros or resolvers with a rated electrical error from 0.25 to 0.5 percent of maximum output voltage; and specially de- signed parts and accessories, n.e.c. [Report servo motors in No. 72210.] 72999 Electric windshield wipers, SXYZ 100 B and parts, n.e.c. [Report electric windshield wipers for motor vehicles in No. 72942.] 72999 Other electrical apparatus 608 SXYZ 100 B n.e.c., and parts, n.e.c.'2' See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0165" 597 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV I dollar value limits or shipments to country groups4 Special provi- sions country groups shown below4 S T V X list4 SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT 73101 Locomotives. [Report elec- No 438 SXYZ 500 100 B trical controls in No. 72220, and other parts in No. 73170.] 73105 Railway cars, equipped with No 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 other jacketed containers of 500 gallons capacity or over for the transportation of liquefied gases.14 73105 Other railway cars and street No 438 SXYZ 500 100 B cars, n.e.c. [Report electrical con- trols in No. 72220, and other parts in No. 73170.] 122 73163 Other containers suitable for No 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 transport by rail, road, and ship, all metals, jacketed only, 500 gallon capacity or over, for the transportation of liquefied gases.14 73163 Other road-rail and similar No 438 SXYZ 500 100 B containers suitable for transport by rail, road, or ship. 73170 Other parts, n.e.c., for loco- 438 SXYZ 500 100 B motives and rolling stock. 73201 Other passenger cars having No 438 SWXYZ 100 B front and rear axle drive. 73202 Motor vehicles equipped No 432 STVWXYZ 500 with other jacketed containers of 500 gallons capacity or over for the transportation of liquefied gases.24 73202 Other military trucks, truck No 438 SWXYZ 100 B chassis, and truck tractors.'3 73202 Nonmilitary trucks, truck No 438 SWXYZ 100 B chassis, and truck tractors, having front and rear axle drive. 73202 Other nonmilitary trucks, No 438 SXYZ 100 B truck chassis and truck tractors. 73203 Other off-highway trucks No 408 SWXYZ 100 B and trailers (including logging trailers), having an axle load rat- ing of 47,500 pounds or more for any one axle assembly (whether the axle assembly consists of one or two axles). (Specify type and axle load rating.) 123 73203 Other off-highway trucks No 408 SXYZ 100 B and trailers (including logging trailers).'22 73203 Other wheel- or truck- No 408 SWXYZ 100 B mounted excavator-type power cranes and shovels, full revolving, over cu. yd. dipper capacity, or over 30 tons crane lifting capacity; and truck carriers, non-military, specially designed for mounting this excavator-type equipment. (Specify type and capacity.) 73203 Other truck-mounted cranes, No 408 SXYZ 100 B drag lines and shovels. 73203 Other searchlight trucks No 608 SXYZ 100 B 73203 Trucks mounted with tele- No Export controls applicable to vehicles included in this communications equipment (in- entry are those which apply to the equipment mounted cluding radar). [See No. 72499.] on the vehicle. (Specify mounted equipment.) 73203 Military and nonmilitary No 432 STVWXYZ 500 vehicles equipped with other jacketed containers of 500 gallons capacity or over for the transpor- tation of liquified gases.'3 ~ 73203 Other special-purpose mill- No 438 SWXYZ 100 B tary vehicles, all types; and other special-purpose nonmilitary ye- hides having front and rear-axle drive.24 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0166" 598 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc- license for shipments to provi- control commodity No. and com- Unit essing required for country groups* sions modity description No. country groups list5 shown below5 S T V X SECTION 7-MAChINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT-Con. 73203 Special purpose vehicles spe- No 402 STVWXYZ 500 100 E-12 daily designed or equipped for geophysical use (for example, well-logging, seismograph, etc.) 73203 Specialpurposevehiclesspe- No 402 SVWXYZ 500 E-12 cially designed or equipped for oilfield use (for example, cement- ing, perforating, acidizing, frac- turing, etc.) 73203 Truck-mounted rotary drill No 402 SVWXYZ rigs incorporating rotary tables with drawworks designed for an input of 150 horsepower and over. 73203 Other truck-mounted drill No 408 SXYZ 100 B rigs. 73203 Truck-mounted concrete No 408 SYZ B mixers (built-in mixers); mobile bituminous combination batch- ing-mixing outfits; mobile gravel and tar spreaders; mobile der- ricks; snow plows, road motor, self-propelled with built-in equip- ment; Towermobiles®; and rub- ber-tired mine shuttle cars. 73203 Other special-purpose non- No 438 SXYZ 100 B military vehicles. 73204 Other military busses; and No 438 SWXYZ 100 B nonmilitary busses having front and rear axle drive.'3 73204 Other nonmilitary busses- - - - No 438 SXYZ 100 B 73205 Truck bodies equipped with No 432 STVWXYZ 500 or consisting of other jacketed con- tainers of 500 gallons capacity or over for the transportation of liquefied gases.54 73205 Other military truck bodies No - - - - - - - 438 SWXYZ 100 B or bus bodies.'3 73205 Other nonmilitary truck No 438 SXYZ 100 B bodies; and all nonmilitary bus bodies. 73280 Parts and accessories spe- 202 SVWXYZ E-15 cially designed for wheel tractors of 125 power takeoff horsepower or over, except contractors' off-highway tractors. 73280 Parts and accessories spe- 208 SYZ cially designed for wheel tractors of 30 power takeoff horsepower up to but not including 125 power takeoff horsepower, except con- tractors' off-highway tractors. 73280 Parts and accessories, except 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-l1 cabs and cab guards (canopy tops), specially designed for nonmili- tary typo tractors and off-the-road vehicles as follows: (a) off-high- way wheel tractors of 135 horse- power or over, and (b) track-laying tractors of 135 horsepower or over. (Specify that parts and accessories are for nonmilitary type tractor and specify horsepower.)124 73280 Other parts and accessories 408 SXYZ 100 B for nonmilitary type off-highway wheel tractors and other track- laying tractors. (Specify that parts and accessories are for non- military typo tractor and specify horsepower.)'24 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0167" 599 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1908-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT-Con. 73280 Parts and accessories spe- 408 SWXYZ 100 B cially designed for other off- highway trucks and trailers (in- cluding logging trailers), having an axle load rating of 47,500 pounds or more for any one axle assembly (whether the axle as- sembly consists of one or two axles.). 73280 Other parts and accessories 408 SXYZ 100 B for off-highway trucks and trailers (including logging trailers). 73280 Parts,n.e.c.,fornoninilitary 402 SVWXYZ 1,000 E-12 truck carriers, specially designed for mounting excavator power cranes and shovels, nonmilitary, full revolving, over 1 cubic yard dipper capacity or over 30 tons crane lifting capacity. (Specify type and capacity of mounted equipment.) [Report parts for mounted equipment in No. 71842.] 73280 Other parts and accessories 438 SWXYZ 100 B designed for, or intended for use on, military vehicles. [See § 399.2, Interpretation 19.] 73280 Other parts and accessories 438 SWXYZ 100 B specially designed for front and rear axle drive nonmilitary ve- hicles. 73280 Other parts and accessories 438 SXYZ 100 B for nonmilitary vehicles. [Report truck body tanks in No. 73205.] 73300 Military and nonmilitary 432 STVWXYZ 500 trailers, n.e.c., or other vehicles equipped with other jacketed containers of 500 gallons capacity or over for the transportation of liquefied gases. [Report containers designed for mounting on trailers or other vehicles in Nos. 69221- 69299, 69892, 69899 or 73163.] 54 73300 Other partsdesigned for, or 438 SWXYZ 100 B intended for use on, military trailers. [See § 399.2, Interpreta- tion 19.] 73300 Other nonmilitary commer- 438 SXYZ 100 B cial trailers, and parts. 73410 Other nonmilitary ground No 432 STVWXYZ 500 FG effects machines (GEMS), includ- ing other surface effect machines and air cushion vehicles. (Specify make and model.)'3 73410 Other nonmilitary helicop- No 432 STVWXYZ 500 FG ters and aircraft. (Specify make and model.)'23 73491 Nonmilitary airships; non- No 432 STVWXYZ 500 expansive balloons of less than 3,000 cubic feet capacity; and non- expansive balloons in normal sporting use, of 3,000 cubic feet capacity or over'2' 73491 Other pilot balloons; and No 218 SXYZ 100 B meteorological balloons. 73492 Other power transmission 432 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-2 systems for other nonmilitary heli- copters; and parts. (Specify make and model of helicopter.) 125 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0168" 600 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special license for shipments to provi- required for country groups* sions country groups list* shown below* S T V X SECTION 7-MACHINERY AND TRANSPORT EQUIP- MENT-Continued TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT-Con. 73492 Other rotors, rotor blades, 432 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 E-2 lift and pitch fans, and propellers for helicopters, aircraft, and air- ships; and parts. (Specify make and model.) 125 128 73492 Other landing gear assem- 432 STVWXYZ 1,000 1,000 B -2 blies for helicopters, aircraft, air- ships, and balloons; and parts. (Specify make and model.) 125 128 73492 Other parts and accessories - 432 STVWXYZ 1, 000 1,000 E-2 n.e.c., for helicopters, aircraft, air- ships, and balloons. (Specify make and model.) 125 73580 Ships, boats and other yes- S. ton 268 SWXYZ 500 100 B sels, for breaking up (for scrapp- ing).l2l 73593 Pontoons, metal, for support- 268 SWXYZ 500 100 B ing temporary bridges. 73593 Other floating structures 268 SXYZ 500 100 B other than vessels, n.e.c.'27 73600 Parts and accessories speci- Export controls applicable to each commodity exported under this fically ordered and invoiced as classification are those which apply to the commodity when ex- original equipment previously ported under its individual Export Control Commodity Number. shipped. SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES SANITARY, PLUMBING, HEATING AND LIGHTING FIXTURES AND FITTINGS 81230 Lavatories, sinks, and other (128) 438 SWXYZ and 500 100 B sanitary and plumbing fixtures, Rep. So. specially designed for aircraft; and Africa. parts. 81241 Railroad reflector signals 408 SXYZ 500 100 B 81242 Landing lights and other 438 SWXYZ and 500 100 B lighting fixtures specially design- Rep. So. ed for aircraft. Africa 81242 Headlamps and other light- 438 SXYZ 500 100 B ing fixtures designed for locomo- tives and railway cars. FURNITURE 82108 FurnIture specially designed 438 SXYZ 500 100 B for aircraft; and parts, n.e.c. CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES [Report military apparel in No. 95200; and used civilian clothing in No. 26700.] 84160 Underwater apparel designed Lb 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B for scuba diving. [Report breath- ing apparatus in No. 86172.] 84180 Clothing donated for relief Export controls applicable to each commodity under or charity by individuals, private this classification are those which apply to the com- agencies or governmental agencies, modity when exported commercially under its Export except new clothing by govern- Control Commodity Number. mental agencies. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0169" 601 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 23, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f dollar value limits or shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below' S T V X list* SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND C0NTROLLINGINSTRUMENTS;PH0- TOGRAPHIC AND OPTICAL GOODS, WATCHES, AND CLOCKS Optical elements, unmounted 86111 Optical elements of silicon No 242 STVWXYZ 500 500 - with a purity of 99.9 percent up to but not including 99.9 percent silicon. (Specify weight.) 86111 Nonfiexible fused fiber opti- No 622 STVWXYZ 250 500 250 cal plates or bundles, optically worked, in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 microns. 86111 Other optical elements, un- No 628 SXYZ 500 100 B mounted, n.e.c. OPTICAL ELEMENTS, MOUNTED 86112 Lenses and other optical ele- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B ments for other high-speed cam- eras capable of recording at rates in excess of 2,000 frames per sec- ond; and lenses and other optical elements for X-ray powder cam- eras. 86112 Nonflexible fused fiber optic No 622 STVWXYZ 250 500 250 plates or bundles, optically worked, in which the fiber pitch (center to center spacing) is less than 30 microns. 86112 Other photographic and pro- No 218 SXYZ 500 100 B jection lenses. 86112 Optical elements specially No 628 SWXYZ 500 100 B designed for spectrum measuring instruments or microphotometers. 86112 Other mounted optical ele- No 628 SXYZ 500 100 B ments. 86133 Other electron and proton No 628 SXYZ 500 100 B microscopes and diffraction ap- paratus, and parts and accessories. 86139 Other searchlights and spot- (121) 608 SXYZ 500 100 B lights; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. 86139 Other optical appliances, 628 SXYZ 500 100 B n.e.c., and parts and accessories, n.e.c.'3 86140 Streak cameras having writ- (131) 212 STVWXYZ 500 ing speeds of less than 8 mm/mi- crosecond, capable of recording events which are not initiated by the camera mechanism; and spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c.'3° 86140 Other high-speed cameras (131) 218 SWXYZ - 500 100 B capable of recording at rates in excess of 2,000 frames per second; - and X-ray powder cameras; and specially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. 86140 Photographic micro-flash 212 STVWXYZ 25 500 25 equipment capable of giving a flash of between 1/100,000 and 1/200,000 second duration, at a minimum recurrence frequency of 200 flashes per second; and spe- cially designed parts and acces- sories. (Specify by name). See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0170" 602 SWXYZ and Rep. So. Africa SXYZ 438 SWXYZ and Rep. So. Africa 418 SWXYZ 418 SXYZ NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued OPTICAL ELEMENTS, MOUNTED-Continued 86140 Other photographic cameras (131) 218 SYZ (excludes motion picture), camera parts and accessories, and photo- graphic flashlight apparatus and parts, n.e.c. 86150 Other high-speed motion pic- (132) 218 SWXYZ ture cameras capable of recording at rates in excess of 2,000 frames per second; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 86150 Other motion picture cam- (132) 218 SYZ eras, motion picture projectors, and motion picture sound record- ing and reproducing equipment; and parts.2 86161 Other photographic projec- (132) 218 SYZ tors, enlargers and reducers (other than motion picture), and parts. 86169 Other still picture, motion (133) 218 SYZ picture, photographic, and photo- copying equipment, n.e.c., and parts. 86172 Other self-contained diving 628 SWXYZ and underwater breathing appara- tus (scuba); and specially de- signed components therefor, n.e.c.134 86172 Aircraft oxygen systems, ap- 438 paratus, equipment and compon- ents, n.e.c.; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86172 Mine safety appliances; and 623 psychological, educational, or physical aptitude testing appara- tus; and parts, n.e.c. 86181 Gas or liquid supply meters. No 418 SXYZ [Report parts in No. 86199.] REVOLUTION COUNTERS, PRO- DUCTION COUNTERS, SPEEDOME- TERS, AND SIMILAR COUNTING DEVICES, NOT ELECTRICALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OPERATED; AND STROBOSCOPES, ALL TYPES [Report electrically or electronically operated counters and similar de- vices in No. 72952; and parts in No. 86199] 86182 Revolution counters and 412 STVWXYZ similar counting devices specially designed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hy- pervelocity wind tunnels and de- vices for simulating environments at Mach 0.8 and above. 86182 Mechanical tachometers for aircraft engines. 86182 Stroboscopes containing one No or more electronic components. 86182 Other stroboscopes No See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 500 B 500 100 B 500 B 500 B 500 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B PAGENO="0171" 603 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1965-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below° GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* - S P V X Special provi- sions Iist* SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued SURVEYING, HYDROGRAPHIC, NAVI- GATIONAL, METEOROLOGICAL, HY- DROLOGICAL, AND GEOPHYSICAL INSTRUMENTS, NOT ELECTRI- CALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OPER- ATED; COMPASSES; RANGEFIND- ERS; AND PARTS [Report electrically or electronically operated in No. 72952] 86191 Other precision gyroscopes, 432 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 including rate and integrating gyros; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. (Spe- cify by name and model or type number.) 135 86191 Other gyro compasses; and 432 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 parts and accessories, n.e.c.'35 (Specify by name and model number.) 86191 Other aircraft flight and 438 SWXYZ and 500 100 B navigation instruments, not elec- Rep. So. trically or electronically operated; Africa. and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c.133 (Specify by name and model number.) 86191 Instruments specially de- 412 STVWXYZ signed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hy- pervelocity wind tunnels and devices for simulating environ- mentS at Mach 0.8 and above; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86191 Other instruments specially 622 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 designed to operate at tempera- tures below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.); and specially designed parts and accessories.'35 86191 Other gravity meters (gravi- 408 SWXYZ 500 100 B meters) (specify by name); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. 86191 Transits, phototheodolites, - - - - - 628 SWXYZ 500 100 B and tachymeters (tacheometers), having a telescope magnification of 20x or higher and reading direct to 1 sexagesimal minute or better; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c.'36 86191 Other compasses; and other 628 SXYZ 500 100 B surveying, hydrographic, naviga- tional, meteorological, hydrologi- cal, and geophysical instruments; and parts. 86191 Range finders specially de- No 218 SWXYZ 500 100 B signed for (a) other high speed cameras capable of recording at rates in excess of 2,000 frames per second, and (b) X-ray powder cameras. 86191 Range finders for other still No 218 SYZ 500 B cameras, except hand-type fixed focus; and motion-picture cam- eras, except 16 mm. and 8 mm. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0172" SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued DRAWING, MARKING-OUT, CALCU- LATING, DRAFTING, MEASURING AND CHECKING INSTRUMENTS, APPLIANCES AND MACHINES, NOT ELECTRICALLY OR ELECTRONI- CALLY OPERATED; AND PARTS [Report electrically or electronically operated In No. 72952] 604 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITE1~IS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Validated GLV dollar value limits Special Department of Commerce export Proc- license for shipments to provi- control commodity No. and com- Unit essing required for Country groups* sions modity description No. country groups list* shown below* S T V X 412 STVWXYZ 86193 Measuring and checking in- struments, appliances, and ma- chines specially designed for use with transonic, supersonic, hyper- sonic, and hypervelocity wind tunnels and devices for simulat- ing environments at Mach 0.8 and above; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86193 Comparators; dividers; gear 428 SWXYZ checkers (comparators); and other machinists' precision measuring tools, except gear testers; and parts. 86194 Technical models for demon- 218 SYZ 2 stration. [Report aircraft training devices and flight simulators in No. 89999.] MECHANICAL APPLIANCES FOR TEST- ING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF INDUSTRIAL MATERIALS, NOT ELECTRICALLY OR ELECTRONI- CALLY OPERATED [Report electrically or electronically operated In No. 72952; and parts In No. 86199] 86195 Other centrifugal-action test- 412 STVWXYZ ing equipment. (Specify by name.) 86195 Equipment capable of per- 412 STVWXYZ forming tests at temperatures below minus 2020 F. (minus 1300 C.). 86195 Vibration testing equipment 412 STVWXYZ capable of providing a thrust of 2,000 pounds or less. 86195 Mechanical testing appliances 412 STVWXYZ specially designed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hypervelocity wind tunnels and devices for simulating en- vironments at Mach 0.8 and above. 86195 Testing devices specially de- 412 STVWXYZ signedfor testing electronic assem- blies produced by: (a) automati- cally inserting and/or soldering components on insulating panels, plates, or wafers to which wiring is applied by printing or other means, or (b) automatically or semi-automatically assembling, wiring, and/or packaging mount- ed modular insulated panels, plates or wafers. 89195 Other testing and inspecting 412 STVWXYZ equipment specially designed for use in the production of electronic tubes and semi-conductor devices or parts and components therefor. (Specify by name.) 80195 Other mechanical appliances 418 SXYZ for testing physical propertiSl of industrialmaterlals. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 500 100 B 500 B 100 500 100 100 500 100 E-9~ 500 500 500 500 500 500 100 B PAGENO="0173" 605 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITE1~IS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export Proc- control commodity No. and corn- Unit essing modity description No. Validated license required for GLV f c dollar value limits or shipments to ountry groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list° SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued HYDROMETERS AND SIMILAR IN- STRUMENTS; THERMOMETERS, PY- ROMETERS, BAROMETERS, HY- GROMETERS, PSYCHROMETERS, AND ANY COMBINATION OF THESE; NOT ELECTRICALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OPERATED [Report electrically or electronically operated in No. 72952; and parts in No. 86199] 86196 Hydrometers and similar in- 412 STVWXYZ struments, thermometers, pyrom- eters, barometers, hygrometers, psychrometers, and any combina- tion of these, specially designed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hypervelocity wind tunnels and devices simulat- ing environments at Mach 0.8 and above. 86196 Aircraft type hydrometers 438 SWXYZ and 500 100 B and similar instruments; and air- Rep. So. craft type thermometers, pyrom- Africa. eters, barometers, hygrometers, psychrometers, and any combina- tion of these. 86196 Other hydrometers and sim- 418 SXYZ 500 100 B ilar instruments; and other ther- mometers, pyrometers, barom- eters, hygrometers, psychrom- eters, and any combination of these. INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASURING, CHECKING OR AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLING THE FLOW, DEPTH, PRESSURE OR OTHER VARIABLES OF LIQUIDS OR GASES, OR FOR AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLING TEMPERATURE, NOT ELECTRI- CALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OP- ERATED [Report electrically or electronically operated in No. 72952; and parts in No. 86199] 86197 Control equipment specially 412 STVWXYZ 1, 000 1,000 designed for hot or cold isostatic presses (No. 71980) requiring a validated license to all Country Groups but not subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Veri- fication procedure. 86197 Other instruments capable of 622 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 maintaining an ambient tempera- ture below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.).137 86197 Meters with inlet or outlet 412 SVWXYZ 100 100 E9 diameter 10 inches or larger spe- cially designed to measure flow in petroleum and/or natural gas pipe lines. 86197 Control instruments spec- 412 STVWXYZ ially designed for use with tran- sonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hypervelocity wind tunnels and devices simulating environments at Mach 0.8 and above. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0174" 606 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f c dollar value limits or shipments to ountry groups* Special provi- sions list* country groups shown below* S T V X SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASURING, CHECKING OR AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLING THE FLOW, DEPTH, PRESSURE OR OTHER VARIABLES OF LIQUIDS OR GASES, OR FOR AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLING TEMPERATURE, NOT ELECTRI- CALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OP- ERATED-Continued 86197 Aircraft engine Instruments 438 SWXYZ and 500 100 B for measuring, checking, or auto- Rep. So. matically controlling the flow, Africa. pressure, or other variables of liquids or gases, or for automatic- ally controlling temperature. 86197 Other instruments for meas- 418 SXYZ 500 100 B uring, checking, or automatically controlling the flow, depth, pres- sure, or other variables of liquids or gases or for automatically con- trolling temperature. INSTRUMENTS FOR PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; INSTRU- MENTS FOR CHECKING VISCOSITY, POROSITY, EXPANSION, SURFACE TENSION, AND SUCH INSTRU- MENTS FOR MEASURING OR CHECKING QUANTITIES OF HEAT, LIGHT, OR SOUND, NOT ELEC- TRICALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OPERATED; AND PARTS [Report electrically or electronically operated in No. 72952] 86198 Other laboratory, scientific, - -- - 622 STVWXYZ 100 500 100 and optical measuring equipment capable of maintaining an am- bient temperature below minus 202° F. (minus 130° C.); and spec- ially designed parts, n.e.c. (Spec- ify by name.) `37 86198 Other mass spectrographs 622 STVWXYZ 500 FG and mass spectrometers, except mass spectrometer-type leak detec- tors; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. (Specify by name and model number.) 86198 Instruments specially do- 412 STVWXYZ signed for use with transonic, supersonic, hypersonic, and hy- pervelocity wind tunnels and de- vices for simulating environments at Mach 0.8 and above; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86198 Spectrum measuring instru- 628 SWXYZ 500 100 B ments, optical; and densito- meters; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86198 Other laboratory instru- 628 SXYZ 500 100 B ments for physical or chemical analysis; instruments for checking viscosity, porosity, expansion, surface tension, etc.; instruments for measuring~or checking quan- tities of heat, light, or sound; and parts. See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0175" 100 500 100 - 500 - B 500 - 100 B 500 25 - E-3 500 500 500 250 500 250 607 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export Proc- control commodity No. and corn- Unit essing modity description No. Validated GLV dollar value limits Special provi- sions list* license required for country groups shown below* for shipments to country groups* S T V - X 500 100 B 100 500 100 E-9 SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued INSTRUMENTS FOR PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; INSTRU- MENTS FOR CHECKING VISCOSITY; POROSITY, EXPANSION, SURFACE TENSION, AND SUCH INSTRU- MENTS FOR MEASURING OR CHECKING QUANTITIES OF HEAT, LIGHT, OR SOUND, No ELEC- TRICALLY OR ELECTRONICALLY OPERATED; AND PARTS-Con. 86198 Chemical analysis equip- 418 SWXYZ ment, qualitative and quantita- tive (chemical analytical equip- ment utilizing chemical and/or physical separation analytical principles) (specify by name); and specially designed parts, n.e.c. [Report production scale puri- fying and separating units in No. 71923.] 86198 Industrial process instru- 412 STVWXYZ ments capable of operating or performing tests at temperatures below minus 202~ F. (minus 130~ C.), and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86198 Other centrifugal-action test- 412 STVWXYZ ing equipment (specify by name); and specially designed parts, n.e.c. 86198 Photographic exposure 218 SYZ (light) meters, and parts. 86198 Other instruments for phys- 418 SXYZ ical or chemical analysis; instru- ments for checking viscosity, porosity, expansion, surface ten- sion, etc.; and instruments for measuring or checking quantities of heat, light, or sound; and parts.'3 PARTS AND ACCESSORIES, N.E.C., FOR INTEGRATING METERS, ELEC- TRICAL MEASURING AND CON- TROLLING INSTRUMENTS, INDUS- TRIAL AND LABORATORY INSTRU- MENTS, APPLIANCES, AND DEVICES UNDER NOS. 72951, 72952, 86181, 86182, 86195, 86196, AND 86197: 86199 Parts and accessories wholly 222 STVWXYZ made of polyvinyl fluoride. 86199 Parts and accessories, n.e.c., 622 STVWXYZ for other mass spectrographs and mass spectrometers. (Specify by name.) 86199 Amplifiers, electronic or 602 STVWXYZ magnetic, designed for use with resolvers as follows: (a) isolation types having a variation of gain constant (linearity of gain) better than 0.5 percent and not less than 0.2 percent, or (b) summing types having a variation of gain con- stant (linearity of gain) or an ac- curacy of summation of better than 0.5 percent and not less than 0.2 percent; and specially designed parts. (Specify by name and model number.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0176" 608 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEM~S CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S P V X Special provi- sions list* SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued PARTS AND ACCESSORIES, N.E.C., FOR INTEGRATING METERS, ELEC- TRICAl. MEASURING AND CON- TROLLING INSTRUMENTS, INDUS- TRIAL AND LABORATORY IN- STRUMENTS, APPLIANCES, AND DEVICES UNDER N0S. 72951, 72952, 86181, 86182, 86195, 86196, AND 86197-Continued 86199 Other isolation and summing 608 SWXYZ 500 100 B type amplifiers; and parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 86199 Other amplifiers designed to 608 SWXYZ 500 100 B operate at frequencies from 300 megacycles up to and including 500 megacycles; and parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 88199 Oscilloscope amplifiers and 608 SWXYZ 500 100 B preamplifiers having a bandwidth 608 SWXYZ 500 100 B greater than 5 megacycles up to and including 12 megacycles; and parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 86199 Other amplifiers designed 628 SXYZ 500 100 B for use in nuclear measurements; and parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 13 86199 Other amplifiers, n.e.c.; and 608 SXYZ 500 100 B parts. (Specify by name and model number.) 13 86199 Parts and accessories sped- 422 STVWXYZ 500 1,000 1,000 ally designed for electronic closed loop control systems designed solely for positioning operations. 86199 Other parts and accessories, Export controls applicable to commodities included in n.e.c., for meters, instruments, this entry are those which apply to the meter, instrument, appliances, and devices classified appliance, or device for which the parts and accessories under Nos. 72951, 72952, 86181, are designed. 86182, 86195, 86196, and 86197. (Specify name of meter, instru- ment, appliance, or device.) 86230 Other prepared photographic 248 SXYZ 500 100 chemicals. B 86246 Motion picture film 35mm. Lin. 1t - - - 218 SXYZ 500 100 B and over, sensitized, unexposed. 86246 X-ray film and plates, Sq. ft 218 SYZ 500 B graphic arts film and plates, and still picture ifim and plates, sen- sitized, unexposed. 86248 Motion picture films, silent Sq. ft 218 SXYZ 138 500 100 B or sound, undeveloped negative, 35mm. or over. 86402 Clock movements; and tim- 218 SXYZ 500 100 B ing mechanisms not for timepiece use.'3 MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES N.E.C. [Report magnetic tape in No. 89120; and empty reels according to material (for example, steel reels in 69891, nonferrous metal reels in 69899, and fiberboard reels in 64294.] `~ 89120 Magnetic recording media 618 SYZ 138 500 B designed for voice and music only. (Specify by name and type num- ber.) 13 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0177" 609 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce control commodity No. an modity description export Proc- d com- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV f c dollar value limits or shipments to ountry groups* Special provi- sions country groups shown below* S T V X list* SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued M5SCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES N.E.C-Continued 89213 Maps, hydrographic charts, 218 YZ B atlases, g azeteers, globe covers, and globes (terrestrial or celestial). 89300 Pressure sensitive tape Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 coated or impregnated with fluor- ocarbon polymers or copolymers. (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 89300 Pressure sensitive polyester Lb 222 STVWXYZ 500 500 500 E-3 tape suitable for dielectric use (condenser tissue), as follows: (a) tensifized film with thickness greater than 0.002 inch (0.0254 mm.) up to and including 0.0015 inch (0.038 mm.), and (b) unten- silized and unmetallired film with thickness greater than 0.00035 inch (0.009 mm.) up to and including 0.0015 inch (0.038 mm.). 89300 Silicone rubber manufac- 228 SWXYZ 500 100 B tures, n.e.c., including silicone rubber packing. 89300 Other articles, n.e.c., con- Lb 222 STVWXYZ 25 500 25 E-3 taming polyimides, polybenzi- midazoles, polyimidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polypara- xylylenes, polyimide-polyamide fluorocarbon polymers or copoly- mers. except polyvinyl fluoride, or wholly made of polyvinyl fluor- ide. (Specify name and value of these substances and total value of other materials.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 89300 Articles, n.e.c., of artificial 222 STVWXYZ 500 25 plastic materials containing silica, quartz, carbon or graphite fibers in any form.13 89300 Hose or tubing lined with, or Pieces 222 STVWXYZ 50 500 50 E-3 covered with, other fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. (Specify length of each piece.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 89300 Other manufactures, n.e.c., 222 STVWXYZ 50 500 50 E-3 (a) partially made of polytetra- fluoroethylene or polychlorotri- fluoroethylene, or (b) made of molding compositions containing more than 20 percent by weight of other fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers (Specify by name.) (See § 399.2, Interpretation 22.) 89300 Nonflexible fused fiber optic 612 STVWXYZ 250 500 250 plates or bundles in which the fiber pitch (center to center spac- ing) is less than 30 microns. 89430 Nonmilitary shotguns, over (140) 218 SXYZ and (141) 100 B 20 inch barrel length; and parts Rep. So. therefor. [Report military arms Africa and parts in Nos. 95101-95104.] `~ 89430 Wooden gun stock blanks 218 SXYZ 500 100 B harpoon launchers, whaling guns, and other nonmilitary arms, n.e.c.; and parts, n.e.c.139 89442 Other self-contained diving (See Export Control Commodity No. 86172.) and underwater breathing ap- paratus (scuba); and specially designed components therefor, n.e.c.'34 See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. 97-627 0-68-pt. 2-12 PAGENO="0178" SECTION 8-MISCELLANE- OUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES-Continued MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES N.E.C.-Continued 89715 Goldsmiths' and silver- 218 SYZ smiths' wares, and articles of pre- cious metals, except jewelry.78 89927 Wire cloth sieves, all types, including electroformed, contain- ing 95 percent or more nickel, with 60 or more sieves per linear centi- meter or the equivalent thereof. 88929 Prepared knots and tufts, Doz 218 SYZ cotton or wool, for broom or brush making. 89997 Vacuum bottles, jugs and 218 SYZ chests; and parts, n.e.c. 89998 Parachutes in normal sport- 212 STVWXYZ Ing use, and complete canopies, harnesses, and platforms there- for.142 89998 Other parachute parts and accessories.'42 89999 Other nonmilitary aircraft ground handling equipment, ground installed arresting sys- tems, flight simulators, ground flying trainers and other related equipment, n.e.c.; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. 89999 Manufactured articles, n.e.c 218 SXYZ SECTION 9-COMMODITIES AND TRANSACTIONS NOT CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO KIND SPECIAL TRANSACTIONS NOT CLASSIFIED BY KIND 610 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITE~\~S CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-ContInued Department of Commerce control commodity No. and modity description export Proc- corn- Unit essing No. Validated license required for GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups4 Special provi- sions list4 country groups shown below S T V X 218 STVWXYZ 500 B 100 500 100 E-3 500 B 500 B 500 1,000 1,000 500 100 B 500 100 B 500 100 B 218 SXYZ 438 SXYZ 93100 Replacement parts used in WYZ (143) the repair of articles being re- Processing Numbers applicable to each commodity under turned to the country from which this classification are those which apply to the corn- imported into the United States modity under its individual Export Control Corn- for inspection, testing, calibra- modity Number. tion, or repair. (Specify article and repair part by name.) 93100 Parts used in the alteration Export controls applicable to parts used are those which apply when of articles being returned which such parts are exported commercially under their individual Export were imported into the United Control Commodity Numbers. States for alteration other than inspection, testing, calibration, or repair. (Specify article and parts added.) 93100 Commodities, n.e.c., donated Export controls applicable to each commodity under this classifica- for relief or charity by individuals tion are those which apply to the commodity when exported corn- or private agencies. (Specify by mercially under its individual Export Control Commodity name.) [Report exports of com- Number. In addition, see paragraph 373.65(a)(2)(v). modities for relief or charity pur- poses by governmental agencies, excluding used clothing, under the applicable classification for the commodity being exported; and report used clothing in No. 84180.] 93100 General merchandise valued Export controls applicable to each commodity under this classification at less than $100, except where the are those which apply to the commodity when exported commer- shipment requires a validated li- cially under its individual Export Control Commodity Number. cense. (Specify by name.) 93100 Bacteria. (Specify by name.) 248 SXYZ 500 100 B 93100 Other commodities not clas- 218 SXYZ 500 100 B sified according to kind. (Specify by name.) See footnotes at end of table, p. 611. PAGENO="0179" 611 NON-COCOM CONTROLLED ITEMS CONTROLLED BY THE UNITED STATES TO EASTERN EUROPE, JUNE 25, 1968-Continued Department of Commerce export control commodity No. and com- Unit modity description Proc- essing No. Validated license required for country groups shown below* GLV dollar value limits for shipments to country groups* S T V X Special provi- sions list* SECTION 9-COMMODITIES AND TRANSACTIONS NOT TO KID-Continued ARMS, MILITARY VEHICLES, ETC.13 95103 Wooden gun stock blanks.'4' 95104 Sidearms, n.e.c., and parts. (Specify by name.) 145 95110 Survival kits, and other mili- tary equipment not identified by kind.13 (Specify by name.) 952 Military apparel, including footwear.'3 (Specify by name.) 218 218 218 218 SXYZ SWXYZ SWXYZ SWXYZ 500 500 500 500 100 100 100 100 B B B B ®Trademark registered in the Patent Office of the United States. 1 Report fresh milk and cream in "gallon." 2 Report sweet corn seed in "pound." Report safflower seed in "pound." See paragraph 370.5(d) for ores and concentrates which require export authorization from the Atomic Energy Commission. 5 Barrel of 42 gallons. Thermal stability is determined as follows: twenty c.c. of the fluid under test shall be placed in a 46 c.c stainless steel chamber containing one each of .5 inch diameter balls of M-10 tool steel, 52100 steel, and naval bronze. The chamber shall be purged with nitrogen, sealed at atmospheric pressure, and the temperature raised to 371 plus or minus 6° C. and maintained at this temperature for six hours. The specimen will be considered thermally stable if at the completion of the above procedure all of the following conditions are met: (a) the weight loss of each ball is less than 0.1 milligram per square centimeter of surface, (b) the change in original viscosity as determined at 38° C. is less than 25 percent, and (c) the total acid or base number is less than .40. See § 399.2, Interpretation 22. Report greases in "pound." `Dinitronaphthalene, picric acid, and tetranitronaphthalene require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other commodities which require export authoriza- tion from the U.S. Department of State. 10 Report toluene and benzene in "gallon." 11 See paragraph 370.5(c) for commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Treasury Department. 12 See paragraph 370.5(a) for herbicides and other commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 13 See paragraph 370.5(a) for commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 14 Report methanol in "gallon"; report acetylene in "thousand cubic feet"; and report glycerine in "content pound." 15 Helium and mixtures thereof require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 10 Fluorine requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). `7 Hydrazine requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other commodities requiring export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 18 Potassium nitrate requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 1~ See paragraph 370.5(b) for commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Treasury Department. 20 Report alkalies, ammonium compounds and bleaching compounds in "pound"; and report liquid air in "thousand cubic feet." 21 Radioisotopes produced in a nuclear reactor, and compounds and preparations thereof, and uranium and thorium compounds are under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. See para- graph 370.5(d). 22 See paragraph 370.5(d) for commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. 23 See paragraph 370.5(a) for explosives which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 24 All oil well bullets, jet perforators, shaped charges or pellets used in oil well operations are under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Commerce whether or not they contain explosive compounds men- tioned on the Munitions List, paragraph 370.5(a). 25 Other blasting caps, igniters and detonators require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 26 Report shotgun shells and cartridges in "thousand." 27 A GVL dollar-value limit of $50 is established for the shipment of shotguns shells and $100 for the ship- ment of parts for shotgun shells to the Republic of South Africa. 28 Hunting and sporting rifle cartridges require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 29 Nitrostarch requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. PAGENO="0180" 612 ~° See paragraph 370.5(a) for antiplant chemicals which require export authorization from the U.S. De- partment of State. 31 Report D DT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) preparations in "content pound" weight of DDT. 32 Report the following commoditiies in "pound": collecting agents for the concentration of ores and minerals; and composite diagnostic and laboratory reagents. ~ See § 399.2, Interpretation 22. ~ See paragraph 370.5(a) for types of tires and tubes which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. Also see § 399.2, Interpretation 20. 3~ Tensile strength to density ratio (figure of merit) is tensile strength times (2.55 divided by specific gravity of the fiber). 36 Report in both "pound" and "square yard." ~ Report broad woven fabrics in both "pound" and sqaure yard." ~8 Report tape in "pound." 39 Gas and incandescent mantles containing thorium require export authorization from the Atomic Energy Commission. See paragraph 370.5(d). 45 Refractories for rockets, guided missiles, and jet engines require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 41 Report brick and similar shapes except plastic brick and shapes in "thousand." 42 Refractories for use in rockets, guided missiles, and military jet engines require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 43 Report gaskets, packing, textiles, and yarns in "pound." 44 Report brake linings in "pound." 45 Windshields having a thickness exeeding 2A of an inch and specially fabricated for types of aircraft licensed by the U.S. Department of State require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 46 Report glass envelopes for electric light bulbs in "thousand," and glass envelopes for other than cathode ray tubes in "number." ~ Specify recognized designations (AISI, SAE, NE number, etc.), or percentage of each alloying element. ~ For definitions of "special types" of alloy steel, see § 399.2, Interpretations 8 and 9. ~ Armor plate requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 20 Castings and forgings of any article enumerated in paragraph 370.5(a) require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. ~ See paragraph 370.5(b) for gold which requires export authorization from the U.S. Treasury Department. 22 United States coins containing silver require export authorization from the U.S. Treasury Department (see paragraph 370.5(h)). 53 Report fabricated steel plate, stacks, weidments, structural iron and steel, doors and door and window sash, frames and molding and trim, and central heating or cooling ducts in "pound"; and report prefabricated and portable buildings in "number." 24 A jacketed container is a thermos type container that has more than one wall and is insulated by a vacuum or by insulation material. 22 Report tanks for storage or manufacturing use, and septic tanks, in "number." 26 Report tanks for storage or manufacturing use in "number." ~7 Electric conducting cable suitable for sweeping magnetic mines or for harbor defense requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 28 Report fencing and fence gates in "pound." 29 Report tools in "number." 60 Report bits and reamers in "number." 81 Submarine and torpedo nets; aircraft landing mats; military armored vests; and military helmet liners requireexport authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other com- modities which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 82 Report fabricated wire products and venetian blinds in "pound." 83 Report the following in "pound": aluminum venetian blinds and parts; domestic utensils, including cookware and hollow ware of tin, tinplate or pewter; nails, tacks, staples, spikes and similar articles; and wire products. 64 See § 399.2 Interpretations 4 and 10, for commodity interpretations related to shipments of machinery. 65 Report complete units of fire tube power boilers in "number." 86 For export control purposes "furnace volume" is the volume of the combustion chamber formed by refractory or tubular walls and floor, i.e., the inside dimension of the chamber; and "dry weight of the boiler" is the total weight of the boiler (excluding the air heaters) less the water required for steaming. 67 Report heat exchangers and condensers in "number." 68 See paragraph 370.5(a) and § 399.2, Interpretation 20, for commodities which require export authoriza- tion from the U.S. Department of State. 69 Report complete engines and motors (assembled9r unassembled) in "number." 70 Report water turbines and engines (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 71 Report machines and appliances (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 72 Off-highway vehicles are interpreted, for purposes of export control, to be those which, without modifi- cantion by increase of standard tire size and/or spacing, have an overall width of over 98 inches, as measured from outside to outside of rear tires. 73 For export control purposes, the horsepower rating to be used is the horsepower that the basic engine (with fan, water pump and oil pump) is capable of producing at governed speed as measured at the flywheel, corrected to standard conditions of 60~ F. and barometer (dry) of 29.92 inches of mercury. 7~ Report incubators in "number." ~ Spin-forming machines are those which form hot or cold metal by the action of spinning or rotary motion. Examples of spin-forming machines are: Appel, Floturn, Hydrospin, Rollform, Roll, Shear-form, Spin forging, and Slick mill types. 75 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for projectile and ammunition production equipment. See paragraph 370.5(a). 77 Report rolls for rolling mills in both "number" and "pound." 78 Export authorization is required from U.S. Treasury Department for items of which 90 percent of the total value is attributable to gold content. See paragraph 370.5(b). 75 Report complete machines (assembled or unassembled) in "number"; and sewing machine needles in "thousand." . 80 Floating dredgers (Schedule B No. 735.5060) require export authorization from the U.S. Maritime Administration. See paragraph 370.5(e). 81 Report complete dredging machines (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 82 Report attachments for mounting on tractors (dozers, backhoes, rippers, etc.), and complete machines (exclusive of attachments) in" number." PAGENO="0181" 613 83 Report complete machines in "number." 84 Report oil and gas burners in "number." 85 Report complete furnaces and ovens (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 86 Report complete machines, air conditioners, refrigerators, condensing units or refrigerating units (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 87 See § 399.2, Interpretation 17. 88 Report complete machines, ovens, and equipment (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 89 Report heat exchangers in "number." 90 Report condensing units and heat exchangers in "number." 91 Report complete pumps (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 92 Report complete pumps, compressors, fans, and blowers (assembled or unassembled) in "number." ~ Report complete compressors, fans, and blowers (assembled orunassembled) in "number." 9~ Report complete loaders in "number." 95 Report complete machines or devices (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 96 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for launching, arresting, and recovery equipment for military aircraft. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other commodities which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 9~ Report tractors and lift trucks in "number." 98 Report complete machines, rock drills, and other tools (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 99 Tolerances based on standards as adopted by the Anti-Friction Bearing Manufacturers' Association. If the exporter does not know whether a shipment of bearings has these tolerances, the manufacturer of the bearings will be able to provide the information. 100 See § 399.2, Interpretation 11. 101 Report automatic control or regulating valves in "number." 102 Report mounted ball and roller bearings in "number." 103 Report complete motors (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 104 Report the following commodities (assembled or unassembled) in "number": motors, generators, rotating converters, transformers, limiting reactors, and regulators. 105 Report motor starters and contractors, and motor control centers in "number." 156 Electric conducting cable suitable for sweeping magnetic mines or for harbor defense requires export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 107 Report telephone instruments, switchboards, and switching devices, and wire teleprinter units in "number." `~ Report transceivers and broadcast type transmitters and receivers in "number." 109 Report transceivers in "number." 110 Report complete cooking ranges, ovens, electric irons and heating appliances in "number." 111 Report complete batteries (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 112 Report arc lamps in "number." 113 Report lamps (bulbs) in "number." 114 Report complete cranking motors and spark plugs in "number." 115 Nuclear radiation detection and measuring devices (including components, parts accessories, attach- ments and associated equipment therefor), except such devices as are in normal commercial use, require export authorization from the 13.5. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 116 Report permanent magnets in "pound." 197 Report complete furnaces, ovens, heating units and welders (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 118 Report capacitors in "number." 119 Report electrodes for furnace or electrolytic use in "pound." 120 Report complete generators (assembled or unassembled) in "number." 121 Mine detectors require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 122 Armored railroad cars require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 123 "Off-highway" vehicles are interpreted, for purposes of export control, to be those which, without modification by increase of standard tire size and/or spacing have an overall width of over 98 inches as measured from outside of rear tires. 124 For export control purposes the horsepower to be used is the horsepower at the flywheel that the basic engine (with fan, water pump and oil pump) is capable of producing at governed speed, corrected to stand- ard conditions of 60~ F. and barometer (dry) of 29.92 inches of mercury. 125 Helicopters and other aircraft designed, modified, or equipped for military purposes, including recon- naissance and so-called "demilitarized" aircraft, and specially designed parts therefor, require export au- thorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a) and § 399.2. Interpretation 20. 125 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for nonexpansive balloons of 3,000 cubic feet capacity or over, except types in normal sporting use. 127 See paragraph 370.5(e) for information concerning export requirements for watercraft, including off- shore drilling platforms requiring export authorization from the U.S. Maritime Administration. 128 Report ceramic water closet sets, and iron or steel bathtubs, lavatories, sinks and other plumbing fixtures in "number." 129 Report searchlights and spotlights in "number." 130 Streak cameras are cameras designed to record the intensity of a light source as a function of time and of a single spatial dimension, by moving the image of the source along the film in a single direction. 131 Report cameras in "number." 132 Report cameras and projectors in "number." 133 Report motion picture screens in "number." 134 Export authorization from the U.S. Department of State is required for self-contained diving and under- water breathing apparatus designed for a military purpose, and specifically designed components therefor. See paragraph 370.5(a). 135 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for cryogenic equipment for air- borne or space application. See paragraph 370.5(a) for other commodities which require authorization from the U.S. Department of State. 130 See paragraph 370.5(a) for range finders which require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. . 137 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for cryogenic equipment for air- borne or space applications. See paragraph 370.5(a). . . 138 A validated license may also be required for other destinations if this commodity contains technical data. See Part 385. 139 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for (a) firearms of any caliber (including combination rifle-shotguns), nonmilitary shotguns with barrel length of 20 inches or less, and parts and components therefor, and (b) tear gas guns, signal and Very pistols. See paragraph 370.5(a). PAGENO="0182" 614 140 Report shotguns in "number." 141 A GLV dollar-value limit of $100 is established for the shipment of nonmilitary shotguns and $50 for the shipment of parts for these shotguns to the Republic of South Africa. 142 Parachutes (other than those in normal sporting use) for personnel or cargo dropping and aircraft de- celeration, and complete canopies, harnesses, platforms, and electronic release mechanisms therefor, require export authorization from the U.S. Department of State. See paragraph 370.5(a). 143 See paragraph 371.18(a). 144 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for insurgency and counterinsur- gency weapons having a special military application,and all drearms regardless of caliber, and parts therefor, including firearms silencers. 141 Export authorization is required from the U.S. Department of State for bayonets and parts. PAGENO="0183" 615 The Battle Act Report 1967 MUTUAL DEFENSE ASSISTANCE CONTROL ACT OF 1951 Twentieth Report to Congress PAGENO="0184" 616 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL To the Congress of the United States: I am submitting herewith the twentieth report on operations under the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951 (Battle Act). DEAN RUSK Secretary of State JANUARY 27, 1968 PAGENO="0185" 617 CONTENTS CHAPTERS Page I. Multilateral Strategic Trade Controls . . . . 1 II. Additional United States Restrictions on Deal- ing With Communist Areas: Impact on Third Countries 2 United States Government Activities 2 Private Trade and Financial Relations 6 III. Trade in Nonstrategic Goods With the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 9 Government Policy 9 Private Boycotts 10 Public Response 11 Trade Fairs and Trade Missions 14 International Discussion 15 IV. Value and Composition of Trade in 1966 Between Free World and Communist Areas. 17 Significance to the Free World of Trade With Com- munist Areas 18 Significance to Communist Areas of Trade With Free World 24 Appendixes A. Text of Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951 30 B. The Battle Act Lists 35 C. Trade Controls of Free-World Countries 41 D. Statistical Tables . 58 PAGENO="0186" PAGENO="0187" 619 CHAPTER I MULTILATERAL STRATEGIC TRADE CONTROLS This report is submitted pursuant to section 302(b) of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act (Battle Act) of 1951, as amended. The purpose of the Battle Act is "To provide for the control by the United States and cooperating foreign nations of exports to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States . . . ." The cooperation with other nations envisaged by the Battle Act is carried out principally in the Coordinating Committee, or COCOM.1 The following 15 countries are members of COCOM: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States. The operation of COCOM is not governed by a formal treaty or charter. COCOM has agreed on a list of strategic items; member countries control the export of these items. The Battle Act list has the same coverage as the COCOM list. The United States controls the export of the items on the COCOM lists, as well as a wide range of other items for various purposes, pursuant to the Export Control Act of 1949, as amended. The COCOM list is periodically reviewed. COCOM review of a relatively few items took place during the period November 1966- February 1967. Agreement was reached on strengthening controls over two items and on relaxing controls over eight items. Revisions in the COCOM list and in the corresponding Battle Act list became effective March 15, 1967. The revised list is summarized in Appendix B. 1 See last year's Battle Act Report for a brief outline of the origin and development of multilateral consultation on strategic trade controls. 1 PAGENO="0188" 620 CHAPTER II ADDITIONAL UNITED STATES RESTRICTIONS ON DEALING WITH COMMUNIST AREAS: IMPACT ON THIRD COUNTRIES Strategic trade controls applied under the provisions of the Battle Act and Export Control Act are but one part of the limitations placed on the economic relationships between the United States and Communist countries. United States trade and financial transactions with Communist countries are subject to several categories of restrictions. United States Government Activities Section 103(b) of the Battle Act requires the termination of all United States Government military, economic, or financial assistance to any nation which knowingly permits the shipment to the U.S.S.R., and all countries under its domination of arms, ammunition, imple- ments of war, or certain other materials which the Battle Act Administrator determines to be strategic. The U.S.S.R., of course, does knowingly permit such shipments to other Communist countries, and vice versa, and the United States therefore may not engage in any transaction with the U.S.S.R. or other Communist countries which constitutes military, economic, or financial assistance. It has been determined that section 103(b) of the Battle Act applies to Cuba, but such a determination has not been made in the case of Yugoslavia. Military Assistance Regulations under the Export Control Act of 1949, as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 2021 et seq.), and under section 414 of the Mutual Secu- rity Act of 1954, as amended (22 U.S.C. 1934), are administered so as to prevent the export from the United States to the Communist areas in Eastern Europe, Asia, and Cuba of any arms, ammunition, imple- ments of war, or other strategic materials which would be covered by 2 PAGENO="0189" 621 the international strategic trade controls required by the Battle Act. In addition, the regulations issued under the Export Control Act prohibit the export of any item as to which the President determines that such export would make a significant contribution to the mili- tary or economic potential of these Communist areas that would be detrimental to the national security and welfare of the United States. Finally, Government agencies, such as the Defense Department, have their own internal regulations which are designed to prevent transfer of Government property directly or indirectly to Communist areas in any case where such a transfer would be inconsistent with the restric- tions applicable to private exports. Thus, export of any article which would constitute military assistance to such areas is precluded. &onomi~ and Financial Assistance Because of the prohibition in the Battle Act against United States Government economic or financial assistance to Communist areas, there is a general restriction against public financing of transactions with such areas if that financing is on terms which would constitute assistance for purposes of the Battle Act. Generally, the extension of the right of deferred payment for purchases, whether directly or through export guaranty or insurance, on terms commonly encoun- tered in commercial transactions would not constitute assistance. United States Government agencies participate in such extensions of deferred payment for the purpose of facilitating United States exports, not to assist the purchasers. However, some public programs are sub- ject to special additional restrictions. A. ALL COMMUNIST COUNTRIES 1. Foreign Assistance Act Section 620(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, prohibits any assistance under that Act to Communist countries unless the President finds that the assistance is vital to United States security, the recipient country is not controlled by the international Communist conspiracy, and the assistance will further promote the independence of the recipient country from international communism. 2. Export-Import Bank The Export-Import Bank of Washington is authorized to guarantee, insure, coinsure, and reinsure United States exporters. It conducts an export guaranty program to facilitate United States exports and participates with the Foreign Credit Insurance Association, an unin- corporated association of United States insurance companies, in a 3 PAGENO="0190" 622 program of credit insurance covering United States export transac- tions. These activities, conducted within the range of common com- mercial practice, are not considered public assistan~e to countries which purchase United States exports and are therefore not pro- hibited by the Battle Act. However, Title III of t1~e Foreign Assistance and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1968 (Public Law 90-249; 81 Stat. 943) contains the following limitation on the authority of the Export-Import Bank to participate in financing United States exports to Communist countries: None of the funds made available because of the provisions of this title shall be used by the Export-Import Bank to either guarantee the payment of any obligation hereafter incurred by any Cummunist country (as defined in section 620(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended) or tiny agency or national thereof, or in any other way to participate in the extension of credit to any such country, agency, or national, in connection with the purchase of any product by such country, agency, or national, except when the President deter- mines that such guarantees would be in the national interest and reports each such determination to the House of Representatives and the Senate within 30 days after such determination. An identical provision has been contained in the corresponding appropriation Act for previous fiscal years. 3. Public Law 480 Title I of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended (7 U.S.C. 1691 et seq.; Public Law 480), authorizes the United States to make sales of agricultural commodities to "friendly countries." Section 103(d) of this Act defines "friendly country" for purposes of such sales to exclude, inter alia, "(1) any country or area dominated or controlled by a foreign government or organization controlling a world Communist movement," and "(2) for the purpose only of sales of agricultural commodities for foreign currencies . . . any country or area dominated by a Communist government." In addition, section 103(j) of this Act provides (1) that the President shall exercise title I authorities "to assist friendly countries to be independent of domina- tion or control by any world Communist movement," and (2) that nothing in the Act "shall be construed as authorizing sales agreements under title I with any government or organization controlling a world Communist movement." Finally, however, section 103(d) of Public Law 480 has another pertinent provision. It states that, notwithstanding any other Act (including the Battle Act), "the President may enter into agreements for the sale of agricultural commodities for dollars on credit terms under title I . . . with countries which fall within the definition of 4 PAGENO="0191" 623 `friendly country' for the purpose of such sales." The provisions cited in the preceding paragraph exclude foreign currency sales to those Communist countries or areas which are not dominated or controlled by a government or organization controlling a world Communist movement. Thus, this last cited clause would permit dollar credit sales to certain Communist countries in certain circumstances. At present no such sales are taking place. B. CUBA AND NORTH VIET-NAM 1. Foreign Assistance Act The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and the Foreign Assistance and Related Agencies Appropriation Act contain several provisions aimed against trade and shipping contacts between aid recipient countries and either Cuba or North Viet-Nam. Section 620(a) (3) of the Foreign Assistance Act prohibits assistance under that Act to any country that fails to take appropriate steps to prevent ships or aircraft under its registry from transporting to or from Cuba: (i) items of economic assistance, (ii) items included on the Battle Act title I embargo list, or (iii) any other equipment, materials, or commodities. Section 620(n) of the Foreign Assistance Act prohibits assistance under that Act or any other act and prohibits sales under Public Law 480 to any country which sells or furnishes to North Viet-Nam, or which I)ermits ships or aircraft under its registry to transport to or from North Viet-Nam, any equipment, materials, or commodities. Sections 107(a) and 116 of the Appropriation Act prohibit assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act to any country which sells, furnishes, or permits any ships under its registry to carry to Cuba or North Viet-Nam: (i) items on the Battle Act title I embargo list or (ii) any other articles, materials, or supplies of primary strategic significance used in production of arms, ammunition, and implements of war or of strategic significance to the conduct of war, including petroleum products. Section 107(b) of the Appropriation Act prohibits economic assist- ance under the Foreign Assistance Act to any country which "sells, furnishes, or permits any ships under its registry to carry items of economic assistance" to Cuba or North Viet-Nam. 2. P.L. 480 Section 103 of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended by the Food for Peace Act of 1966 (80 Stat. 1527), includes the following provision directed against Cuba and North Viet-Nam: 5 PAGENO="0192" 624 [In exercising the sales authorities in title I of this Acti . . . the President shall- (d) make sales agreements only with those countries which he determines to be friendly to the United States . . . As used in this Act, "friendly country" shall not include . . . (3) for the purpose only of sales of agricultural commodities under title I of this Act, any nation which sells or furnishes or permits ships or aircraft under its registry to transport to or from Cuba or North Vietnam (ex- cluding United States installations in Cuba) any equipment, materials, or com- modities so long as they are governed by a Communist regime: Provided, That with respect to furnishing, selling, or selling and transporting to Cuba medical supplies, non-strategic raw materials for agriculture, and non-strategic agricultural or food commodities, sales agreements may be entered into if the President finds with respect to each such country, and so informs the Senate and the House of Representatives of the reasons therefor, that the making of each such agreement would be in the national interest of the United States and all such findings and reasons therefor shall be published in the Federal Register Private Trade and Financial Relations Export of Strategic MateriaLs As indicated in the section on military assistance, United States export control and munitions control regulations, administered by the Departments of Commerce and State, would prevent the export of strategic items, directly or indirectly, by private individuals to Communist areas. This is true whether the transactions are commercial sales, credits, or gifts. In addition, certain types of transactions are subject to restrictions even if no strategic item is transferred as a result. Private Credit Transactions-the Johnson Act The Johnson Act (18 U.S.C., sec. 955), as amended, prohibits certain financial transactions by private persons in the United States involving foreign governments which are in default in the payment. of their obligations to the United States unless they are members of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) or International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD). The prohibited trans- actions include the making of "loans" to, and the purchase or sale of "bonds, securities, or other obligations" of, a foreign government which is within the statutory category. The U.S.S.R. and all the countries of Eastern Europe with the exception of Bulgaria and Albania are governments in default in the payment of their obligations to the United States within the meaning of the Johnson Act. Yugoslavia is a member both of the International Monetary Fund and of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development and is thereby exempted by the terms of the Johnson Act, as amended, from the prohibitions therein. 6 PAGENO="0193" 625 The Attorney General has ruled that the Johnson Act does not prohibit extensions of credit "within the range of those commonly encountered in commercial sales of a comparable character." The Attorney General has also stated that the scope of the Johnson Act should not be measured in terms of distinctions among the various forms of financing export trade. He determined that financing arrangements lie beyond the scope of the Johnson Act "if they are directly tied to specific export transactions, if their terms are based upon bona fide business considerations, and if the obligations to which they give rise `move exclusively within the relatively restricted channels of banking and commercial credit.'" (42 Op. Atty. Gen. No. 27) Under section 11 of the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as amended (12 U.S.C., sec. 635h), transactions in which the Export- Import Bank participates are exempt from the provisions of the Johnson Act. Imports From Communist Countries Section 231(a) of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 (19 U.S.C., 1861(a)) directed the President, as soon as practicable, to suspend, withdraw, or prevent the application of concessions, including reduc- tions or maintenance of duties proclaimed in carrying out. any trade agreement with respect to products of any country or area dominated or controlled by communism. The effect of this directive is to prevent the extension of nondiscriminatory tariff treatment to Communist countries. In the cases of all other nations the United States has undertaken to give most-favored-nation treatment and extend to all the benefits of trade concessions negotiated with any country. The only exception to this directive is through section 231(b) of the Trade Expansion Act, which authorized the President to continue such nondiscriminatory tariff treatment for any Communist countries which were receiving trade concessions as of December 16, 1963. The only Communist countries receiving such concessions then were Poland and Yugoslavia, and most-favored-nation trade treatment has been continued for those two countries. Under existing legislation such nondiscriminatory treatment is not possible for any other Communist country. Thus, any imports from such other Communist countries would not be entitled to the more favorable tariff rates or duty-free treatment which may have been granted .by the United States since 1930 under reciprocal trade agreements legislation. The importation of seven specific types of furs from the Soviet Union is prohibited by Headnote 4 for schedule 1, part 5, subpart B of the Tariff Schedules of the United States (77 A Stat. 32; 19 U.S.C. section 1202). 7 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 13 PAGENO="0194" 626 In addition, special low duties .or none at all for a few products- bamboo pipe stems and manganese ore-has been provided by statute, but Communist countries have been excluded from the benefits of many such statutory adjustments. Cuba, Communi~st China, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam Under regulations issued pursuant to section 5(b) of the Trading with the Enemy Act, as amended (50 U.S.C., App. 5(b)), (1) no person subject to United States jurisdiction may engage in any unlicensed financial or commercial transaction, and (2) no interest in property subject to United States jurisdiction may be transferred through any unlicensed transaction with the following: Cuba, Communist China, North Korea, or North Viet-Nam; any designated national of any of those regimes; or any agent of any of those regimes. These regulations constitute a virtual embargo on all trade or finan- cial transactions, direct or indirect, with the designated regimes, their nationals, and their agents. 8 PAGENO="0195" 627 CHAPTER III TRADE IN NONSTRATEGIC GOODS WITH THE SOVIET UNION AND EASTERN EUROPE Government Policy United States controls on trade with the Soviet Union and other Communist countries have been instituted for the purpose of promot- ing the security of the United States. These controls and underlying legislation are a reflection of the state of tension that has existed be- tween the free world and the Communist countries in varying degrees since shortly after World War II. While maintaining United States defenses, successive administra- tions have been alert for ways of lessening tension between the great power groupings. In his State of the Union message on January 10, 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson characterized our relations with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe as being in transition, and he ob- served that the United States objective is not to continue the cold war but to end it. He urged the Congress to take legislative steps necessary to advance this objective. Illustrating the steps that the United States has taken in an effort to reduce international tensions, the President cited among other steps the agreement to open direct air flights with the Soviet Union, the removal of 400 nonstrategic items from export control in the previous year, and the agreement at the United Nations on the peaceful uses of outer space. During 1967 the Senate approved the Consular Convention with the Soviet Union, and it was ratified by the President. Also during the year most of the arrangements were completed toward implementation of the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Civil Air Transport Agreement establishing a direct New York-Moscow service. The position outlined by the President on East-West relations in his State of the Union message has been reflected in statements by other administration spokesmen during the year. In Cincinnati on February 17, 1967, Foy D. Kohler, Deputy Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and former Ambassador to the Soviet Union, called attention to the revolution of rising expectations 9 PAGENO="0196" 628 of the people in the Soviet Union who are becoming increasingly aware of the way we live in the West and of the benefits which are available to us. They are demanding, he stated, some of the same things for themselves and are building up irresistible pressures on their rulers. Ambassador Kohier went on to propose that it should be our role to take advantage of these trends of thought and to encourage con- structive change within the Communist states. He suggested that closer commercial relations between the Communist states and the West would be in our interest because they could help bring about a diversion of their resources from military and space programs to con- sumer goods. Trade, he commented, is a useful instrument to maintain leverage on the Communist world to encourage demands within the Communist countries for greater availability of consumer goods. Anthony M. Solomon, Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs, analyzed the role of foreign trade in moving the countries of Eastern Europe toward internal economic reform before an audience of businessmen in Chicago on March 2, 1967. Trade can play an affirmative role in the moulding of Communist economic structure. Furthermore, the increase of peaceful trade would be one most important indication to the Communist world that the United States really wants normal relations and peaceful competition, Mr. Solomon said. Such action would strengthen the hands of those in the Com- munist world who favor constructive relations with the West and would undercut those who look to the barrel of the gun. This approach was also emphasized in Secretary of Commerce Alexander Trowbridge's address at an East-West Trade Conference, Bowling Green, Ohio, on May 4, 1967. Peaceful trade, he said on this occasion, can form one of the strongest and most durable means of exchange between East and West. He also cited the notably increased national interest and national debate on this subject across the United States-by business groups and the general public. Private Boycotts In light of efforts by certain groups to prevent some commercial transactions with Eastern Europe, there was occasion during the year to reaffirm the propriety of trade conducted in accordance with United States laws and regulations. The I)amphlet entitled Private Boycotts vs the National Interest 1 clarifies United States policy in this respect. It concludes by stating: 1 Department of State publication 8117, Aug. 1966. 10 PAGENO="0197" 629 All American citizens should know that any American businessman who chooses to engage in peaceful trade with the Soviet Union or Eastern European countries and to sell the goods he buys is acting within his rights and is following the policy of his government. So, too, is any American citizen who chooses to buy such goods. Everyone should also know that state laws or municipal ordinances 1)urporting to forbid or restrict sale of such goods, or to require that signs be posted proclaim- ing that imported goods are on sale, or to require payment of special fees, are contrary to the policy of their government. Moreover, in eases where such laws and ordinances have been challenged, the courts consistently have held them to be illegal. Any citizen may properly exercise his constitutional right to speak freely. But any organization, however patriotic in intention, that undertakes to boycott, blacklist, or otherwise penalize or attack any American business for engaging in peaceful trade with Eastern European countries or the Soviet Union, is acting against the interests of the United States. Public Response The administration's view that the security and well-being of the United States are advanced by utilizing expanded trade in nonstrategic goods as one means of reducing tension with the Soviet-oriented nations was carefully examined in a number of congressional studies. There was continued interest in the issue of expanding trade with Com- munist countries by the Congress and among business and private groups. One of the most searching case studies of East-West trade was contained in the report "Our Changing Partnerships with Europe" published February, 1967 by the Special Study Mission to Europe 1966 of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representa- tives. In the section of their report dealing with Eastern Europe, five of the six mission members expressed the following conclusion: Our policy of trade restraints does, however, deny American farmers and manufacturers the opportunity to compete for markets in Eastern Europe. It restricts American presence in that part of the world and isolates us from contact with the people of Eastern Europe. And, by doing this, it diminishes whatever influence we could exert to promote the development of those countries in the direction of economic and political liberalization. For although the volume of our exports to Eastern Europe is unlikely to rise dramatically, the opportunity for a moderate expansion of trade in non-strategic commodities is there. And we believe that greater exposure to American goods, personnel, and methods, can hell) to stimulate demand for consumer goods in Eastern Europe and put increased lressure on the governments of that area to reduce the l)ortion of their national resources being devoted to military purposes. A comprehensive report on "The FIAT-Soviet Auto Plant and Corn- munist Economic Reforms" was issued on March 1, 1967 by the Sub- committee on International Trade of the Committee on Banking and Currency of the House of Representatives. 11 PAGENO="0198" 630 In its statement of March 9, 1967 on United States policy toward East-West trade, the United States Council of the International Chamber of Commerce set forth a number of recommendations which support and suggest government action iii expansion of East-West trade. The United States Council represents some 300 major United States corporations and banks engaged in international trade and production. The Council proposed a series of measures it would urge the United States Government to take over a period of time should the climate for a regularization of trade between East and West continue to improve. The Council urged that the President be empowered to grant most-favored-nation tariff status to Eastern European nations, seeking in return concessions for American businessmen including market access for United States products, protection of industrial property rights, the right to more direct contact between United States business- men and the ultimate consumer/supplier, and satisfactory arbitral arrangements for the settlement of commercial disputes. The Council also focused on problems of credit, urging that United States suppliers be enabled to match the terms offered by their competition; on the other side of the coin, it was recommended that the administration attempt to include provisions for reciprocal credit in trade agreements negotiated with individual Communist countries. Looking farther ahead, the Council favored encouraging efforts, such as Poland's, to become associated with the GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade) and emphasizing the benefits in negotiations with Eastern European countries, accruing from currency converti- bility and possible membership in the IMF and IBRD. An expansion of East-West trade was called for, by the Action Committee on Export Promotion in its report of March 10, 1967 to the National Export Expansion Council. This panel of 70 businessmen making up the Action Committee endorsed the philosophy expressed in the initial recommendation of the Miller Committee report 2 sub- mitted in 1965 to' President Johnson that "peaceful trade in non- strategic items can be an important instrument of national policy in our country's relations with individual Communist nations of Europe." The report of the Action Committee was adopted by the National Export Expansion Council on April 3, 1967 and submitted to the President on May 23, 1967. In furtherance of the objective of expansion of commercial relations with Eastern Europe, many regional East- West trade committees have been set up throughout the United States. 2 Full Title: Special Committee on United States Trade Relations with East European Countries arid the Soviet Union. 12 PAGENO="0199" 631 Meeting at Arden House, Harriman, New York, April 27-30, 1967 in the 31st American Assembly were 71 persons prominent in business, education, government, communication, labor, agriculture, and the clerical, legal, and military professions who discussed in depth "the United States and Eastern Europe." The Assembly stated in Proposal IV that the changing situation in Eastern Europe afforded new op~)ortUflitieS for mutually beneficial economic relations, especially trade. The Assembly suggested the elimination of all legislative and procedural controls over trade in nonstrategic items with Eastern Europe more restrictive than those of our allies, so that trade relations may become normal, and supported the concept of granting to the President the authority to extend nondiscriminatory treatment to imp Drts from any Eastern European state when he determines it to be in the national interest. The Bankers Association for Foreign Trade, meeting in Palm Springs, California on April 26, 1967, announced endorsement of action that would facilitate East-West trade within the framework of our nation's security and economic self-interest, favoring those nations which by their course of conduct evidence a desire to improve their relations with the United States. The Association also endorsed short- and medium-term guarantees by the Export-Import Bank for export loans to European countries. The 54th National Foreign Trade Convention, October 30-Novern- bem 1 in New York City, dealt with the question of trade with the Soviet Union and Eastern European countries. Resolution III of the published Declaration states that, in accord with the views and recom- mendations set forth by previous National Foreign Trade Conven- tions, this Convention welcomes initiatives by the United States Government in seeking to improve commercial relations with the Soviet Union and the separate countries of Eastern Europe. The resolution continues that the Convention concurs in the belief that tensions may be reduced through improved trade relations and sup- ports the continued efforts of the Government in this direction. Contrasting with the foregoing expressions of support, there were indications that many members of the Congress and the public at large had difficulty in reconciling a policy of United States initiatives to improve East-West relations with the involvement of Communist countries in Viet-Nam. While statements by individual members of the Senate and the House reflected differing viewpoints, it was clear that there was a considerable measure of concern in the Congress over legislation at the present time that would liberalize trade with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. 13 PAGENO="0200" 632 A congressional study mission3 to Europe summarized this attitude in these words: For the present, the key issue in the United States-Soviet trade formula is Vietnam. There is substantial sentiment in the U.S. Congress in-opposition to any expansion of trade with the Soviet Union or Eastern Europe while the Communist countries are furnishing assistance to North Vietnam. Trade Fairs and Trade Missions In support of the policy outlined by the President in his State of the Union message and as elaborated by other officials, government agencies have organized presentations at Trade Fairs in Eastern Europe and have encouraged private efforts along similar lines. Official support and encouragement have been given to Trade Missions going to this area. Such efforts have had among their aims that of expanding trade in nonstrategic goods. The United States Government for the first time organized an exhibit in a Soviet International Trade Fair. A separate American pavilion with 18 United States companies exhibiting was mounted at the Soviet Union's Food Machinery Exhibit (Inprodmash 67) held in Moscow May 16-29, 1967. Just about half of the (550,000) visitors to the fair also took in the American pavilion. The flow of specialists who came during the reserved hours was constant and high, and the consensus of those managing the stands was that this was an interested, well-informed group which understood what was being shown. Most United States exhibitors seemed satisfied with the experience and the working contacts established with Soviet commercial elements. Another U.S. exhibit in the Soviet Union was presented at the In- ternational Clothing Fair in Moscow in August 1967. This was a Mobile Trade Fair comprising a fashion show and clothing exhibit with American firms participating. The fashion show was very successful, but unfortunately the clothing exhibit, due to a number of factors, including the last-minute withdrawal of several exhibitors, was smaller than those of some other Western countries and disappointing in its impact on Soviet visitors. In Warsaw and Prague, where the Mobile Fair also appeared, the fashion show and exhibit were favorably re- ceived. Other Eastern European cities where the United States Government sponsored exhibits included Plovdiv, Bulgaria; Brno, Czechoslovakia; Budapest, Hungary; and Poznan, Poland; as well as our long-estab- lished participation in the International Fair at Zagreb, Yugoslavia. As in the past 2 years, the American pavilion at the Budapest Fair attracted great attention. The theme was "Building for the Future". Report of the Special Study Mission of the Subcommittee on Europe of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Nov. 13, 1967. 14 PAGENO="0201" 633 The exhibit presented the American construction industry showing new building products, machines to manufacture building products, and methods of construction. In addition to the 30 United States compa- nies participating in the United States Government-sponsored exhibit, some 30 American firms exhibited independently at the Fair. The "Building for the Future" exhibit was also utilized for the United States Government's 11th participation since World War II in the International Fair in Poznan, Poland, June 11-25, 1967. As in Budapest, the high percentage of display items with commercial or market potential caused the exhibit to be well received by Polish trade and government officials, by journalists, and by scientific and technical groups. The theme of the United States-sponsored exhibit at the Plovdiv International Fair in Bulgaria September 24-October 3, 1967, our third participation in this fair, was a similar one. Our exhibition en- titled "U.S. Construction Industry" was viewed by about 5 percent of the total Bulgarian population, including many key leaders. The United States exhibit at the International Trade Fair in Brno, Czechoslovakia, September 10-17, 1967, where we participated after a 2-year absence, had as its theme "Quality Control-Research and Development." Under the aegis of the Department of Commerce, two Trade Missions visited the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries in 1967. The. first industry-organized and United States Government-approved Trade Mission to visit the U.S.S.R. was sponsored by the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce. During the period May 2-22 it visited Moscow and continued on to Warsaw, Bucharest, and Belgrade. The 15-member Mission represented a wide range of agricultural, industrial, and consumer products and equipment. The same month a group of Californians cosponsored by the California Council and the California World Trade Authority visited Moscow, Kiev, Kishinev, Krasnodar, and Kharkov. This industry- organized Mission representing manufacturers of food processing and packaging machinery, as well as fruit and nut growers, also visited the Soviet Fair INPRODMASH 67. The participation in Trade Fairs and Trade Missions as outlined in this section has been in accordance with public policies set forth by the President and other high United States Government officials. International Discussion At the recommendation of the United States, the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) began a discussion of means of increasing nonstrategic East-West trade. A working 15 PAGENO="0202" 634 party met in September 1967 to review members' trade policies toward Eastern Europe in an effort to identify obstacles both in the East and the West that could be overcome. The discussions will continue in 1968 and will probably. concentrate on trade effects to be expected. from economic reforms going on in Eastern Europe, the specific effects on trade of particular obstacles or of their removal, prospects for industrial and technical cooperation, future trade trends, and the role of prices in trade between market economies and state trading countries. During 1967 discussions of ways to increase East-West trade were continued in the Economic Commission for Europe of which the United States and Western and Eastern European countries are full members. A declaration was passed at the 22d session in April, which, among other points, stated the following: "The member countries of the Economic Commission for Europe shall also continue their common efforts towards the expansion of trade and to this end shall seek to remove the economic, administrative and trade policy obstacles to the development of trade." Following the lines of this resolution, a group of governmental experts met in October to prepare practical proposals for the~ removal of economic, administrative, and trade policy obstacles to the development of trade. Unfortunately the meeting was less than wholly successful because of insistence by some of the Eastern Europeans on passing resolutions that would have attempted to oblige the Western countries to extend uncondi- tional most-favored-nation tariff and quota treatment in all cases. The Western countries were unwilling to obligate themselves in such a fashion fri their trade with state trading countries and were more interested in discussing practical trade obstacles that are capable of solution. 16 PAGENO="0203" 635 CHAPTER IV VALUE AND COMPOSITION OF TRADE IN 1966 BETWEEN FREE WORLD AND COMMUNIST AREAS Trade of the free world with Communist areas in Eastern Europe and Asia advanced to a new high in 1966.2 The movement of goods expanded in both directions more rapidly than total free-world trade. Compared with 1965, however, the rates of gain in free world-Commu- nist area trade were somewhat smaller. Goods valued at $8.5 billion were shipped to Communist markets, $841 million, or 1 1.% higher than in 1965. As a share of total free- world exports of $182 billion in 1966, deliveries increased to 4.7%. Imports moved up by nearly 12% to a level of $9.0 billion. Since free-world l)urchases increased more than sales, the trade deficit with Communist areas grew to $538 million. This compared with free-world deficits of $430 million in 1965 and $257 million in 1964. Two-way trade with East European countries, excluding the Soviet Union, continued to expand. Free-world exports to these nations climbed to $4.2 billion, or nearly half of total shipments to all Com- munist areas in 1966. Goods received from them were valued at $4.0 bfflion. Deliveries to the U.S.S.R. remained level but purchases showed a rise. After increasing steadily for close to a decade, free-world sales to the Soviet Union held at $2.8 billion. Imports, however, expanded to $3.2 billion, $227 million higher than the 1965 value. Free-world imports from Communist China expanded for the fifth year in a row. Merchandise arrivals from there increased by $308 Unless otherwise noted, the term "Commumst areas" includes the following: Eastern Europe-Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Soviet Zone of Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and the U.S.S.R.; Asia-Communist China (for which data refer as far as possible to Mainland China, Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, and Tibet); Outer Mongolia; North Korea; and North Viet-Nam. For purposes of this report the term "free world" includes Yugoslavia. Except in Appendix tables 8A and 8B and in the section of this chapter relating to trade with North Viet-Nam, Cuba is also included in the "free world" in order to maintain conti- nuity with tables showing global statistics in previous years. 2 Exports are generally valued f.o.b.; imports are mainly c.i.f. 17 PAGENO="0204" 636 million to $1.8 billion in 1966. Exports rose less, advancing by $188 mfflion to a total of $1.5 billion. For details of free-world trade with Communist areas, see Appendix D. Significance to the Free World of Trade With Communist Areas U.S. Trade With Communist Areas Despite a substantial increase in 1966, United States trade with European Communist countries represented less than three-fourths of 1% of United States foreign commerce. Recovering from the sharp drop in 1965, American shipments to those markets climbed by $58 million to $198 million. More than offsetting a decline in exports to the U.S.S.R. was an increase of almost two-thirds in deliveries to other East European countries. Major gains were recorded in exports to Romania, Poland, the Soviet Zone of Germany, and Czechoslowlkla. Shipments to Poland, however, fell far short of the high 1964 value when large-scale deliveries of surplus agricultural products were made mainly under Title I of Public Law 480. Most of the advance to Eastern Europe other than the U.S.S.R. was attributable to larger exports of corn, grain sorghums, hides and skins, cotton, and various types of machinery. Shipments to the Soviet Union in 1966 slipped by 8% to $42 million. Large decreases in sales of tallow and soybeans were largely respon- sible for the downturn. Imports by this country from European Communist areas have been increasing steadily in recent years. In 1966 they advanced by $41 million to $182 million. The bulk of the rise was in expanded pur- chases from Poland and Czechoslovakia, especially canned hams, frozen fish, and fur skins from the former, and machinery, pig iron, and leather footwear from the latter. Arrivals from the U.S.S.R., valued at $49 million, were $7 million higher, but this gain was only a third of the rise in 1965. Pig iron, chrome ore, and diamonds were the major buoyant items. Although somewhat lower in value than in 1965, the platinum group metals remained the principal category of goods purchased from the Soviet Union. The United States had a larger surplus in its trade with the East European Communist areas. The improvement in 1966 stemmed from a large positive balance with the smaller nations of Eastern Europe which more than offset a deficit with the U.S.S.R. In 1966 United States exports to Communist areas in Asia continued 18 PAGENO="0205" 637 to be virtually nil. United States imports from Communist China, mostly antiques, fell to $100,000 from about three times that level in 1965. Arrivals from Outer Mongolia, largely animal fur and hair, ran at $3.4 million, a little below the 1965 value. Western Europe's Trade With Communist Areas Western Europe's exports to Communist areas advanced `by 17% to a value of $4.7 billion in 1966, nearly double the rate of gain in shipments to all destinations. Despite the substantial increase, exports to those areas represented only 5% of the region's total exports to all markets. All countries shared in the rise with the exception of Ireland, Norway, Finland, and Yugoslavia. Increases of a fourth to a third were recorded by Germany, the United Kingdom, and France, the three leading West European exporters to Communist areas. Among the smaller sellers to those markets, Switzerland and Greece also had fast rates of expansion; Spain's was the sharpest, with a doubling of her exports. Only Greece and Yugoslavia shipped more than one-fifth of their goods to Communist nations. The bulk of the $661 million expansion in sales to Communist areas was accounted for by a better than one-fifth rise in deliveries to Eastern Europe excluding the U.S.S.R., principally to the Soviet Zone of Germany, Bulgaria, Poland, and Czechos1ovakia~. Exports to the U.S.S.R., on the other hand, declined by 2% to $1.1 billion. Those to North Viet-Nam (discussed in a separate section on page 28) fell by $1 million to $3.9 million, but sales grew to the other small Communist markets in Asia. Shipments to Communist China jumped by more than a third to $483 million. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom provided the bulk of $128 million increase in exports to that country. Imports into Western Europe from Communist areas passed the $5 billion mark for the first time, with a rise of 13% from the 1965 value. This compares with an 8% increase from all sources. Goods from Eastern Europe excluding the U.S.S.R. made up 54% of the $592 million rise from Communist countries. Arrivals from Poland and the Soviet Zone of Germany showed the largest increases, with purchases rising by $60 million and $66 million, respectively. The U.S.S.R. provided one-third of the additional goods and Communist China the remainder. Imports from North Viet-Nam, in contrast, showed a substantial decline. Nearly all West European countries expanded purchases from Com- munist areas. Over four-fifths of the rise was accounted for by the region's five top importers of Communist goods, Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy, Yugoslavia, and France. Only Iceland and Spain 19 PAGENO="0206" 638 received substantially less Communist merchandise, while Greece absorbed almost as much as in 1965. Although Western Europe has been buying an increasing share of its goods from Communist areas in recent years, it received only about 5% of its imports from those countries in 1966. Finland and Yugo- slavia were the sole importers, receiving as much as a fifth of their total supplies outside of free-world sources. European COCOM countries accounted for a significant proportion of free-world trade with Communist areas. Their exports and imports each represented about two-fifths of the respective totals. This trade was only a small part of the total commerce of European COCOM countries. Of the $73 billion exported by the latter group in 1966, $3.3 bfflion, or 41/2%, was shipped to Communist areas. That ratio was equaled or exceeded by Greece (24%), Turkey (15%), Germany (6%), Italy (5%), and France (43/2%). Imports, valued at $3.6 billion, were also a relatively minor part of European COCOM purchases from all sources. The highest shares were bought by Turkey, Greece, Italy, and Germany. Western Europe's Total Trade and Trade With Communist Areas Exports Imports Area 1965 1966 Increase 1965 1966 Increase over 1965 over 1965 Million $ Percent Million $ Percent Total Trade 79, 771 87, 221 +9 90, 375 97, 928 +8 Total Sino and Soviet / Areas 4, 000 4, 661 + 17 4, 470 5, 061 Eastern Europe, cx- cluding U.S.S.R. 2, 487 3, 036 +22 2, 522 2, 844 +13 U.S.S.R 1, 140 1, 122 -2 1, 599 1, 789 +12 Communist China 355 483 +36 335 417 +25 Other Communist Asia 18 20 +11 14 11 Trade of Other Countries With Communist Areas Other free-world countries, excluding the United States and Western Europe, exported $3.7 billion to Communist areas in 1966, while im- ports from these areas amounted to $3.8 billion. The greater part of this commerce was accounted for by a relatively small number of 20 PAGENO="0207" 639 countries-Japan, Cuba, Canada, United Arab Republic, India, Hong Kong, and Argentina. Of these seven, strong increases in exports were recorded by Canada, Japan, and Argentina; marked advances in imports, by Japan, Hong Kong, and the United Arab Republic. Japan's exports to Communist countries advanced by $122 mfflion to a new high of $599 million. This was a faster rate of gain than in Japan's total foreign sales, raising its relative involvement in Com- munist markets to slightly more than 6% of its total trade. Deliveries to Communist China and the U.S.S.R. went up strongly. Product exports were principally iron and steel plates and sheets, fertilizers and other chemicals, machinery, and transport equipment. Imports by Japan increased by $161 million to a value of $688 mil- liOll from Communist areas. Nearly all of the additional purchases came from Communist China and the U.S.S.R. Arrivals were mostly fish, rice, soybeans, timber, fuels, and pig iron. Canadian exports recovered from their big drop in 1965 as larger wheat deliveries were made to the U.S.S.R. and Communist China. Sales to the rest of Eastern Europe fell for the second year in a row. Purchases from all Communist areas, though increasing to $69 million, were less than 1 % of Canadian imports from all sources. After an 8~% rise in 1965, India's exports to European Communist areas advanced marginally to $295 million. Imports dropped to the 1965 value of $281 million. Trade with Communist China remained negligible. The United Arab Republic's dependence on Communist area trade became greater in 1966. Exports edged up to 52% of the country's total; the import share moved up by nearly 3 percentage points to 25%. U.A.R. shipments to Eastern Europe, largely cotton, were higher. Exports to Communist China, however, were sharply lower but were still double those of 1964. Purchases from Eastern Europe and Communist China increased, though the latter remained a relatively small supplier. Hong Kong's high rank among free-world countries as a trader with Communist areas was due entirely to its large imports from Communist China which climbed to a new peak of $485 million. This trade con- sisted mostly of Chinese food products and cotton. The Crown Colony's small, erratic export business with Communist China de- clined in 1966. Argentina stepped up its shipments by a. sixth to $228 million. Most of the rise was in larger deliveries to the smaller nations of Eastern Europe and the rest to the U.S.S.R. After almost doubling in 1965, the 21 PAGENO="0208" 640 country's imports from Communist areas went up slightly to $34 million. Australia, Brazil, Malaysia, Singapore, Pakistan, Ghana, and Morocco are also large traders with Communist areas. Shipments by Australia fell for the second successive year due to reduced purchases of wheat by the U.S.S.R. and Communist China. Brazil's exports and imports showed modera e increases. Malaysia and Singapore together had a much higher level of trade with Communist China. Detailed comparisons with 1965, however, are not possible since data for that year, when Singapore was a member of the Federation of Malaysia, are available only on a combined basis for the two areas. Pakistan had a sizable rise in deliveries to European Communist areas, but those to Communist China declined. Its purchases were higher from Communist sources in Europe and in Asia. Ghana's trade with Communist areas was reduced, especially for imports, while Morocco's expanded. Gompositiom of Trade - More than nine-tenths of the $853 million increase in free-world exports to Communist Europe and Asia in 1965 (the latest year for which detailed commodity data are available) was accounted for by larger sales of manufactured products. This contrasted sharply with developments during 1964 when food products, principally wheat, accounted for the bulk of the rise. Shipments of manufactured products as shown in the following table rose by $799 million to a total of $3.7 billion. The upward movement stemmed mainly from substantial advances in shipments of chemicals, machinery, iron and steel, and nonferrous metals. Except for a sizable decline in machinery exports to the U.S.S.R., deliveries of these manufactures to Eastern Europe and Communist China were greater than in 1964. Despite a rise in Cuban sugar shipments of $113 million largely to Eastern Europe, food exports to Communist areas declined by $218 million in 1965. This decrease was attributed largely to lower sales of wheat and wheat flour to the U.S.S.R. and other East European countries. Larger shipments of cotton and hides and skins sparked a moderate gain in exports of crude materials. The U.S.S.R. was the major recipi- ent of the additional materials; shipments rose slightly to the rest of Eastern Europe and fell to Communist China. 22 PAGENO="0209" 641 Free-World Exports to Communist Areas Commodity 1964 ~ 1965 Value Share of total Value TOTAL Mill ion 5 Percent 6, 815 7, 668 100 Food, beverages, and tobacco 1 2, 348 2, 243 29 Crude materials; fats and oils . . . . 1, 381 1, 482 19 1 Fuels 45 27 Chemicals 526 723 9 Machinery 858 1, 001 13 Transport equipment 337 395 5 Other manufactured goods 1, 167 1, 568 21 Other and unspecified merchandise 2 154 228 3 ~- I Including Cuban sugar. 2 Including Cuban exports of commodities other than sugar valued at $65 million in 1964 and $82 million in 1965. The commodity mix of free-world imports, showed a number of im- 1)ortant shifts. In contrast to 1964 when arrivals of food remained virtually unchanged due to crop shortages in, the Communist areas, imports of these products climbed by $260 million to a total of $1.4 billion. Purchases of chemicals accelerated. On the other hand, imports of machinery slowed to an 11 % rise after increasing by more than three times that rate in 1964. The additional food products taken by free-world countries reflected greater purchases of meat, live animals, fruits and vegetables, barley, wheat, and eggs. Larger deliveries came mainly from Communist China, Hungary, and Poland. Imports of crude materials were $229 million higher as arrivals increased of wood and pulp, cotton, and ores from the U.S.S.R. Purchases of soybeans, silk, and hides and skins from Communist China were also greater. Contributing to the $353 million rise in receipts of miscellaneous manufactures by free-world countries were expanded imports of tex- tiles, clothing, and wood products from Eastern Europe, excluding the U.S.S.R., and from Communist China. Substantial increases also oc- curred in arrivals of platinum, copper, alumiribum, and other base metals from Eastern Europe. In contrast to the strong rise in 1964, imports of pig iron turned downward and iron and steel showed little change. The advances in purchases of fuels, chemicals, and machinery 23 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 14 PAGENO="0210" 642 were small. Sizable gains in free-world purchases of motor vehicles and aircraft led to a $37 mfflion rise in transport equipment, though this group remained comparatively small. Free-World Imports From Communist Areas Commodity 1964 1965 Value Value Share of total TOTAL Food, beverages, and tobacco Crude materials; fats and oils Fuels Chemicals Machinery Transport equipment Other manufactured goods Other and unspecified merchandise 1 Million $ Percent 7, 072 1, 173 1, 161 1, 007 290 530 134 1, 688 1, 090 7, 984 1, 433 1, 415 1, 045 371 590 171 2, 041 918 100 18 18 13 5 7 2 S6 11 1 Includes Cuba imports valued at $689 million in 1964 and $645 million in 1965. Significance to Communist Areas of Trade With Free World Purchases by Communist areas increased by $841 mfflion, or 11 %, to a value of $8.5 billion, according to free-world statistics for 1966. Eastern Europe, excluding the U.S.S.R., and Communist China ac- counted for the rise. Sales to the free world were nearly a billion dollars higher, exceeding $9 billion. The major Communist areas shared in the expanded deliveries. 24 PAGENO="0211" 643 Trade of Communist Areas With Free World Area Imports from free Exports to free world world 1965 1966 1965 1966 COMMUNIST AREAS, TOTAL . . Million $ 7, 668 8, 509 8, 098 9, 047 U.S.S.R 2, 749 2, 769 2, 949 3, 175 Other Eastern Europe 3, 547 4, 198 3, 590 3, 991 Albania 22 21 6 6 Bulgaria 301 426 226 290 Czechoslovakia 754 802 767 797 Hungary 409 471 412 465 Poland 814 895 918 974 Romania 396 494 367 468 Soviet Zone of Germany 821 974 799 878 Unspecified Eastern Europe 30 115 135 113 Communist China 1, 307 1, 494 1, 504 1, 811 North Viet-Nam 23 13 23 20 Other Communist Asia 42 35 32 50 1 Derived from free-world statistics. Imports, f.o.b.; exports, generally c.i.f. EASTERN EUROPE, EXCLUDING THE U.S.S.R. East European imports from the free world rose more rapidly than in 1965. Of the $651 million advance in purchases by these countries, the Soviet Zone of Germany and Bulgaria accounted for over two-fifths and had the highest rates of increase. All of the other East European areas except Albania also recorded substantially higher arrivals of goods. 25 PAGENO="0212" 644 Seven-tenths of the $4.2 billion in merchandise bought by Eastern Europe from the free world originated in Western Europe. Principal suppliers were Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Italy, and Yugoslavia. More than two-fifths of free-world imports by the Soviet Zone of Germany were obtained from West Germany. Sales by Eastern Europe to the free world rose considerably less than its purchases in 1966. Romania was responsible for a fourth of the $401 million expansion in exports by these Communist countries. The bulk of the goods sold by them to the free world was shipped to Western Europe, mainly to Germany, Yugoslavia, Italy, and the United Kingdom. About 39% of East Germany's deliveries to free- world markets were made to West Germany. Eastern Europe traded with numerous developing countries but two-way commerce was substantial only with the U.A.R., India, and Cuba. Export-import trade with each of these three countries ranged from $225 to $275 million in 1966. While purchases from the U.A.R. went up only marginally to $140 mfflion, sales climbed by almost two-fifths to $134 million. Exports to Cuba expanded by a fifth, about twice as fast as imports. Trade with India, on the other hand, showed little change from 1965 levels. U.S.S.R. The Soviet Union purchased about the same value of goods from the free world as in 1965 while shipping more. Imports remained close to $2% billion as exports increased nearly 8% to $3.2 billion in 1966. Buying was reduced slightly in Western Europe, the source of 45% of Soviet imports from the free world. Cutbacks in many countries of the region more than offset increased purchases from some markets, notably the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Yugoslavia. The Far East, mainly Japan and India, supplied the Soviet Union with a fourth of its imports from the free world. Unlike purchases from Western Europe, those from the Far East grew in 1966. About half of the $99 mfflion increase came from Japan which sold the U.S.S.R. mainly ships, steel pipe, and other manufactures. Soviet imports from the Western Hemisphere increased by over 4% to a total of $751 mfflion. A substantial rise from Canada, due principally to larger arrivals of wheat, more than offset reductions in imports from the United States and Cuba. Imports from Australia fell sharply as a result of lower wheat shipments. Continuing as the U.S.S.R.'s major customer, Western Europe absorbed $190 million of the $227 million increase in Soviet sales to the free world. In the region, the largest increases were in deliveries to Yugoslavia, Germany, Finland, France, the United Kingdom, and Belgium-Luxembourg. 26 PAGENO="0213" 645 Soviet exports to the Far East fell by more than a tenth-to $525 million. Although Japan bought $60 million in additional goods, Indonesia's purchases virtually ceased and India's were sharply lower. A gain of $10 million in shipments to the U.A.R. accounted for about a third of the rise in Soviet trade with the Near East. In 1966 exports to the region reached a value of $205 million. COMMUNIST CHINA Communist China's trade with the free world continued expansive in 1966. Imports increased by over 14% to a total of $1.5 bfflion; exports, advancing even faster, climbed to a peak of $1.8 billion. Nine countries-Japan, Canada, Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Argentina, Australia, and Cuba-provided China with nearly three-fourths of its imports from free-world sources. Purchases from Japan increased by 29% to a total of $315 million. Imports from Canada more than recovered from their sharp fall in 1965 to reach a value of $171 million. In addition to large quantities of wheat from Canada and Australia, China received from other countries mainly machinery, transport equipment, copper, chemicals, steel, textiles, and other manufactures. Communist China's ranking outlets in the free world remained Hong Kong and Japan. These two markets, together with eight others-United Kingdom, Germany, France, Cuba, Singapore, Malaysia, Italy, and Ceylon-absorbed four-fifths of the country's exports to non-Communist areas. Sales to Hong Kong of $485 million were a fifth higher than in 1965. The Crown Colony bought mainly cotton fabrics and food- live animals, meat, fish, rice, fruits, and vegetables. Advancing for the second year in a row by around two-fifths, deliveries to Japan reached $306 million in 1966. Principal products purchased by the Japanese were rice, soybeans, fish, and pig iron. Various crude ma- terials comprised the bulk of Mainland China's shipments to other markets. TRADE WITH CUBA Free-world trade with Cuba rose slightly in 1966 but remained far below the high 1964 levels. Purchases from that country slipped to $183 million, while sales rose by about 15% above 1965 to $241 million. A doubling of exports by Spain to $79 million in 1966 made it the principal free-world supplier to Cuba. Canada, the second largest source, had a small rise in shipments, bringing its exports back to the 1964 value. The principal cutback was in United Kingdom sales which dropped by nearly half-to $23 million. Divergent country movements in free-world buying from Cuba 27 PAGENO="0214" 646 led, on balance, to a small decline in imports. As a result of the expansion in its purchases to a 1e~~el of $38 mfflion, Spain also became the principal outlet for Cuban goods in the free world. Among other leading markets, Japan reduced buying by a fourth to a total of $22 million and Morocco by more than half to $17 million. In contrast, the U.A.R. tripled its imports in 1966 to equal those made by Morocco. Cuba's exports to Communist countries declined to an estimated $492 million in 1966, but remained well above .1964 levels. The drop was due to a sharp fall-off in buying by the U.S.S.R., its leading customer, to $285 million. Larger purchases were made by other East European countries and Communist China, but their combined rise was insufficient to offset the Soviet reduction. Imports by Cuba in 1966 from Communist areas rose to nearly the 1964 value as shipments moved up to an estimated $682 million. Arrivals from the U.S.S.R. expanded by a sixth to a total of $479 million and from other East European countries by nearly a fifth to $113 million. In contrast, deliveries by Communist China fell sharply to $85 mfflion. Tables 7A and 7B of Appendix D contain the details of Cuban trade. NORTH VIET-NAM North Viet-Nam became an even smaller outlet and source of goods for the free world in 1966. Shipments to North Viet-Nam declined by $2 million to a total of $12.5 million in that year. The reduction was attributable to smaller deliveries mainly by Belgium-Luxembourg and Cambodia. Imports from North Viet-Nam dropped by $3 million to a total of $2O3/~ million in 1966. Japan, Cambodia, and the principal European COCOM countries bought less from that area. (For detailed data see Tables 8A and 8B of Appendix D.) North Viet-Nam's trade with European Communist areas and Cuba was far greater than that with the free world in 1966. Exports by those countries to North Viet-Nam are estimated at around $130 million, more than 10 times the value of goods shipped there by the free world. Partial data on imports from North Viet-Nam by the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Zone of Germany indicate a decline in goods received by those countries in 1966. Free-World Shipping to North Viet-Nam and Ottba Arrivals of free-world vessels to North Viet-Nam in 1967 were 78 compared with 74 in 1966, but far below the figure of 256 in 1965. These ships, as well as those going to Cuba, are barred from carrying United States Government-sponsored cargoes, and their names are published in the Federal Register. 28 PAGENO="0215" 647 The increase in 1967 was due to calls at North Vietnamese ports by Hong Kong registered vessels flying the British flag but under the effective control of Chinese Communist interests operating out of Hong Kong. These ships accounted for 85% of the total free-world arrivals compared with slightly under 70% in 1966. The remaining free-world ships in this trade are under the registry of Cyprus, Malta, Italy, and Lebanon. These free-world vessels carried no strategic goods or equipment with the exception of small amounts of petroleum products from COmmunist China which were carried on the Hong Kong registered ships. Free-world ships calling at Cuban ports have continued to decline because of diplomatic and other efforts to remove such ships from the trade. In 1965 there were 290 calls by free-world ships at Cuban ports; in 1966 there were only 224 such calls and there were only 174 during the first 10 months of 1967. The appendixes to this report include the text of the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951, the Battle 4ct lists, summaries of the trade controls of free-world countries, and a series of statistical tables on trade of the free world with Communist areas. 29 PAGENO="0216" 648 APPENDIX A Text of Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951, Public Law 213, 82d Congress [H.R. 4550], 65 Stat. 644, Approved October 26, 1951, As Amended by Public Law 87-195 [S. 1983], 75 Stat. 424, Approved September 4, 1961 AN ACT To provide for the control by the United States and cooperating foreign nations of exports to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the "Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951." TITLE I-WAR MATERIALS SEC. 101. The Congress of the United States, recognizing that in a world threatened by aggression the United States can best preserve and maintain peace by developing maximum national strength and by utilizing all of its resources in cooperation with other free nations, hereby declares it to be the policy of the United States to apply an* embargo on the shipment of arms, ammunition, and implements of war, atomic energy materials, petroleum, transportation materials of strategic value, and items of primary strategic significance used in the production of arms, ammunition, and implements of war to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all coun- tries under its domination, in order to (1) increase the national strength of the United States and of the cooperating nations; (2) impede the ability of nations threatening the security of the United States to conduct military operations; and (3) assist the people of the nations under the domination of foreign aggressors to reestab- lish their freedom. It is further declared to be the policy of the United States that no military, economic, or financial assistance shall be supplied to any 30 PAGENO="0217" 649 nation unless it applies an embargo on such shipments to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination. This Act shall be administered in such a way as to bring about the fullest support for any resolution of the General Assembly of the United Nations, supported by the United States, to prevent the ship- ment of certain commodities to areas under the control of govern- ments engaged in hostilities in defiance of the United Nations. SEc. 102. Responsibility for giving effect to the purposes of this Act shall be vested in the person occupying the senior position author- ized by subsection (e) of section 406 of the Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949, as amended, or in any person who may hereafter be charged with principal responsibility for the administration of the provisions of the Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949. Such person is hereinafter referred to as the "Administrator." SEC. 103. (a) The Administrator is hereby authorized and directed to determine within thirty days after enactment of this Act after full and complete consideration of the views of the Department of State, Defense, and Commerce; the Economic Cooperation Administration; and any other appropriate agencies, and notwithstanding the pro- visions of any other law, which items are, for the purpose of this Act, arms, ammunition, and implements of war, atomic energy ma- terials, petroleum, transportation materials of strategic value, and those items of primary strategic significance used in the production of arms, ammunition, and implements of war which should be embar- goed to effectuate the purposes of this Act: Provided, That such deter- minations shall be continuously adjusted to current conditions on the basis of investigation and consultation, and that all nations receiving United States military, economic, or financial assistance shall be kept informed of such determinations. (b) All military, economic, or financial assistance to any nation shall, upon the recommendation of the Administrator, be terminated forthwith if such nation after sixty days from the date of a deter- mination under section 103(a) knowingly permits the shipment to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination, of any such item which he has deter- mined under section 103(a) after a full and complete investigation to be included in any of the following categories: Arms, ammunition, and implements of war, atomic energy materials, petroleum, transpor- tation materials of strategic value, and items of primary strategic significance used in the production of arms, ammunition, and imple- 31 PAGENO="0218" 650 ments of war: Provided, That the President after receiving the advice of the Administrator and after taking into account the contribution of such country to the mutual security of the free world, the impor- tance of such assistance to the security of the United States, the strategic importance of imports received from countries of the Soviet bloc, and the adequacy of such country's controls over the export to the Soviet bloc of items of strategic importance, may direct the con- tinuance of such assistance to a country which permits shipments of items other than arms, ammunition, implements of war, and atomic energy materials when unusual circumstances indicate that the cessa-. tion of aid would clearly be detrimental to the security of the United States: Provided further, That the President shall immediately report any determination made pursuant to the first proviso of this section with reasons therefor to the Appropriations and Armed Services Committees of the Senate and of the House of Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the President shall at least once each quarter review all determinations made previ- ously and shall report his conclusions to the foregoing committees of the House and Senate, which reports shall contain an analysis of the trade with the Soviet bloc of countries for which determinations have been made. SEC. 104. Whenever military, economic, or financial assistance has been terminated as provided in this Act, such assistance can be re- sumed only upon determination by the President that adequate meas- ures have been taken by the nation concerned to assure full compliance with the provisions of this Act. SEc. 105. For the purposes of this Act the term "assistance" does not include activities carried on for the purpose of facilitating the procurement of materials in which the United States is deficient. TITLE IT-OTHER MATERIALS SEC. 201. The Congress of the United States further declares it to be the policy of the United States to regulate the export of commodi- ties other than those specified in Title I of this Act to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination, in order to strengthen the United States and other cooperating nations of the free world and to oppose and offset by nonmilitary action acts which threaten the security of the United States and the peace of the world. * SEc. 202. The United States shall negotiate with any country re- ceiving military, economic, or financial assistance arrangements for 32 * PAGENO="0219" 651 the recipient country to undertake a program for controlling exports of items not subject to embargo under Title I of this Act, but which in the judgment of the Administrator should be controlled to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination. - SEC. 203. All military, economic, and financial assistance shall be terminated when the President determines that the recipient country (1) is not effectively cooperating with the United States pursuant to this title, or (2) is failing to furnish to the United States infor-. mation sufficient for the President to determine that the recipient country is effectively cooperating with the United States. TITLE ITT-GENERAL PRovIsIoNs SEc. 301. All other nations (those not receiving United States military, economic, or financial assistance) shall be invited by the President to cooperate jointly in a group or groups or on an individual basis in controlling the export of the commodities referred to in Title I and Title TI of this Act to any nation or combination of nations threatening the security of the United States, including the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and all countries under its domination. SEC. 302. The Administrator with regard to all titles of this Act shall- (a) coordinate those activities of the various United States departments and agencies which are concerned with security con- trols over exports from other countries; (b) make a continuing study of the administration of export control measures undertaken by foreign governments in accord- ance with the provisions of this Act, and shall report to the Congress from time to time but not less than once every six months recommending action where appropriate; and (c) make available technical advice and assistance on export control procedures to any nation desiring such cooperation. SEC. 303. The provisions of subsection (a) of section 403, of section 404, and of subsections (c) and (d) of section 406 of the Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949 (Public Law 329, Eighty-first Congress), as amended, insofar as they are consistent with this Act, shall be appli- cable to this Act. Funds made available for the Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949, as amended, shall be available for carrying out this Act in such amounts as the President shall direct. SEC. 304. Tn every recipient country where local currency is made available for local currency expenses of the United States in connection with assistance furnished by the United States, the local currency 33 PAGENO="0220" 652 administrative and operating expenses incurred in the administration of this Act shall be charged to such local currency funds to the extent available. SEC. 305. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State such sums as may be necessary from time to time to administer and carry out the objectives of this Act. `34 PAGENO="0221" 653 APPENDIX B Battle Act Title I List-Category A1 100-199 Series: Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War Item No. Description 101 Small arms and machine guns, as follows: (a) Rifles, carbines, revolvers, pistols, machine pistols and machine guns designed specifically for military use; (b) All specifically designed components and parts therefor. 102 Artillery, as follows: (a) Guns, howitzers, cannon, mortars, tank destroyers, rocket launchers, military flame throwers, recoilless rifles; (b) All specifically designed components and parts for the foregoing. 103 Ammunition, and all specifically designed components and parts thereof, for the weapons enumerated under Items 101 and 102. 104 Bombs, torpedoes, rockets, and missiles guided or unguided, as follows: (a) Bombs, torpedoes, grenades (including smoke grenades), smoke canisters, rockets, mines, missiles guided or unguided, depth charges, fire bombs, incendiary bombs; and all specifically de- signed components and parts theref or; (b) Apparatus and devices specifically designed for the handling, control, activation, launching, laying, sweeping, discharging, detonation or detection of items enumerated in sub-item (a); a~id all specifically designed components and parts theref or; (c) Military fuel thickeners, including but not limited to: com- pounds (e.g., octal) or mixtures of such compounds (e.g., napalm) specifically formulated for the purpose of producing materials which, when added to petroleum products, provide a gel-type incendiary material for use in bombs, projectiles, flame throwers or other implements of war. 105 Fire control equipment and range finders, as follows: (a) Fire control, gun laying, night sighting, missile tracking and guidance equipment; (b) Range, position and h&ght finders, and spotting instruments specially designed for military purposes; (c) Aiming devices, electronic, gyroscopic, acoustic and optical, specially designed for military purposes; (d) Bomb sights, bombing computers, gun sights and periscopes specially designed for military purposes; (e) Television sighting units specially designed for military purposes, and inertial platforms; (f) Components, parts, accessories, and attachments specifically designed for the arficles enumerated in sub-items (a), (b), Cc), __________ (d) and (e) above. I List Revision of Mar. 15, 1967. 35 PAGENO="0222" 654 100-199 Series: Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War-Continued Item No. Description 106 Tanks and vehicles specially designed for military purposes, as follows: (a) Tanks and self-propelled guns; (b) Military type armed or armored vehicles, and vehicles fitted with mountings for arms; (c) Armored railway trains; (d) Military half tracks; (e) Military type recovery vehicles; (f) Gun carriers and tractors specially designed for towing artillery; (g) Trailers specifically designed to carry ammunition; (h) Amp?iibious and deep water fording military vehicles; (i) Military mobile repair shops specifically designed to service military equipment; (j) All other specjally designed military vehicles; (k) All specifically designed components and parts for the foregoing. 107 Toxicological agents, as follows: (a) Biological, chemical and radio-active materials adapted for use in war to produce casualties in men or animals, or to damage crops; (b) Equipment specifically designed and intended for the dissemina- tion of the materials described in sub-item (a); (c) Equipment specifically designed and intended for defense against the materials described in sub-item (a), and for their detection and identification; (d) Components and parts specially designed for the items listed in (b) and (c) above. (NOTES: 1. Sub-item (a) above does not include cyanogen chloride, hydrocyanic acid, chlorine, carbonyl chloride (phos- gene), and diphosgene (trichloromethyl-chlorOfOrmate). 2. Sub-item (c) above does not include masks used for protection against specific industrial hazards, such as fumes or powders in mining, quarrying and chemical plants, and gas masks designed for civilian use. 3. Sub-item (c) above does not include personal radiation monitoring dosimeters-see Title I List, Category B.) 108 Powders, explosives and propellants, as follows: (a) Powders and liquid or solid propellants for the articles enumer- ated in Items Nos. 103, 104 and 107; (b) Military high explosives; (c) Chemical base high energy solid or liquid fuels specially formu- lated for military purposes. (NoTE: Sub-items (a) and (b) above are not intended to prevent exports in reasonable quantities of propellants and explosives nor- mally used for civilian or industrial purposes or made up into car- tridges or charges of an exclusively civilian or industrial nature.) 109 Vessels of war, and special naval equipment, as follows: (a) Combatant vessels or vessels designed for offensive or defensive action (surface or underwater); 30 PAGENO="0223" 655 100-199 Series: Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War-~-Continued Item No. Description 109 Vessels of war, and special naval equipment, as follows-Con. (b) (1) Diesel engines of 1,500 h.p. and over with rotary speed of 700 r.p.m. or over specially designed for submarines; (2) Electric motors specially designed for submarines, i.e. over 1,000 h.p. quick reversing type, liquid cooled and totally enclosed; (c) Magnetic, pressure, and acoustic underwater detection devices specially designed for military purposes; controls and compo- nents thereof; (d) Submarine and torpedo nets; (e) Components, parts, accessories and attachments for the fore- going, such as turrets, naval gun mounts, submarine batteries and catapults. 110 Aircraft and helicopters, of the piloted or pilotless types and nero- engines and aircraft or helicopter equipment, associated equipment and components, specially designed for military purposes as set out below: (a) Combat aircraft and helicopters and other aircraft and helicop- ters specially designed for military purposes, including military reconnaissance, assault, military training and logistic support, and all aircraft and helicopters having special structural features such as multiple hatches, special doors, ramps, ieinforced floors and the like, for transporting and airdropping troops, military equipment and supplies; aero-engines specially designed or adapted for use with such aircraft and helicopters, with the exception of aero-engines excepted under Title I-Category B; and component parts thereof; (b) Airborne equipment, including airborne refueling equipment, specially designed for use With the aircraft and helicopters, and the engines of the types of aircraft and helicopters covered by sub-item (a), and component parts thereof. 111 Electronic equipment specially designed for military use, and com- ponents and parts therefor. 115 Military infra-red equipment and specialized components therefor, n.e.s. 116 Munitions components and materials, as follows: (a) Brass and bronze fabrications for primer anvils, fabrications for bullet cups (gilding metal clad steel), cartridge link, primer cap, shell rotating band; (b) Copper rotating bands for shells, and other copper munitions components; (c) Gilding metal clad steel; (d) Rough steel forgings, steel and alloy castings for guns and for arms. 37 PAGENO="0224" 656 200-299 Series: Atomic Energy Materials Item No. Description 201 Source (fertile) and fissionable materials, as follows: (a) Uranium 233, alloys containing uranium 233 and compounds of uranium 233; (b) Uranium enriched in the isotope 235, alloys containing uranium enriched in the isotope 235, and compounds of uranium enriched in the isotope 235; (c) Irradiated uranium containing plutonium; (d) Plutonium, alloys containing plutonium and compounds con- taining plutonium; (e) Irradiated thorium containing uranium 233. (NOTES: (1) This item excludes fuel for civil research and power reactors in connection with which the recipient country has agreed to allow the safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency to be applied. See Title I List, Category B. (2) It is not intended to prevent the export of shipments not exceeding a total of ~ooo microcurie of the materials embargoed by this item.) 218 Equipment specifically designed for the separation of isotopes of uranium and/or lithium. 236 Nuclear reactors, i.e. reactors capable of operation so as to main- tain a controlled, self-sustaining fission chain reaction; major com- ponents designed or intended for use in a nuclear reactor such as reactor vessels, core support structures, coolant pumps, fuel element handling equipment, heat exchangers and control rod drive mecha- nisms; and power generating and/or propulsion equipment, n.e.s., specially designed for use with nuclear reactors. (NoTE: This item excludes civil research and power reactors, in- cluding major components thereof, in connection with which the recipient country has agreed to allow the safeguards of the Inter- national Atomic Energy Agency to be applied. Such reactors are covered separately in the Title I List, Category B.) Battle Act Title I List-Category B The Category B portion of the Title I embargo list, as of March 15, 1967, covers parti~ular $7)eCifled form~s, including specialized parts and assemblies, of the following items: Metalworking Machinery: Grinding heads and spindle assemblies; presses; spin-forming machines; equipment for producing gas turbine blades; aircraft manufacturing machinery; machinery for manufacture of jet engines; gear making machinery; numerical control systems. Chemical and Petroleum Equipment: Equipment for processing irradiated materials; gas liquefying equipment; equipment for production of deuterium oxide; equipment for production of 38 PAGENO="0225" 657 military explosives and solid propellants; gas centrifuges; electrolytic cells for production of fluorine; vacuum pumps; pumps delivering liquids; valves, cocks, and pressure regulators; heat exchangers; pipe and tubing made with fluoro- carbons; containers for liquefied gases. Electrical and Power-Generating Equipment: Electric vacuum furnaces; electron beam equipment; devices for direct coli- version of chemical, solar or nuclear energy to electrical energy; electric arc devices; civil research and power reactors, for which safeguards of International Atomic Energy Agency apply; non-magnetic diesel engines. Industrial Equipment: Metal rolling mills; machinery for extrusion of polytetrafluoroethylene; cable- making machinery; equipment for manufacture of electronic components; syn- thetic film machinery; blowers and compressors. Transportation Equipment: Warships (whether or not converted to non-military use) ; other vessels (in- cluding fishing and hydrofoil) ; cable suitable for sweeping mines; automotive vehicles, tractors, and lift trucks built to military specifications; aircraft and helicopters; compasses and gyroscopic equipment. Electronic and Precision Instruments: Airborne communication equipment; airborne navigation equipment and ground and marine equipment for use therewith; airborne, ground, and marine direction- finding equipment; airborne, ground and marine radar equipment; communica- tion, detection and tracking equipment using infra-red radiation, ultra-violet radiation, ultrasonic waves, or tropospheric, ionospheric, or meteoric scatter phenomena; jamming apparatus; underwater location apparatus; pulse modu- lators; panoramic radio receivers; radio transmitters; telemetering and tele- control equipment; telegraph equipment; radio relay communications equip- mnent; amplifiers and oscillators; dosimeters and dose rate meters; other com- munication transmission equipment; mass spectrographs and spectrometers; communication cable; equipment for providing communication secrecy; meas- uring, testing and calibrating instruments; radio spectrum analyzers; electro- magnetic waves guides; cathode-ray tubes; cold cathode tubes and switches; semi-conductor diodes; transistors; dendritic produced forms of semi-conductor material; photo cells; photomultiplier tubes; thermal detecting cells; flash dis- charge X-ray tubes; image intensifiers, image comiverters, electronic storage-tubes and vidicon-type tubes; other electronic tubes; thyratron and modulator gas- discharge tubes; resistive, inductive, and capacitive components; materials for use as absorbers of electromagnetic waves; tantalum and niobium electrolytic capacitors; high component density electronic assemblies and modular insulator panels; computers; control equipment; thermoelectric material and devices; magnetometers; recording and reproducing equipment; centrifugal testing ap- paratus; ion microscopes; oscilloscopes; photographic equipment; quartz crys- tals; materials composed of crystals having spinel hexagonal or garnet crystal structures, and thin film devices; neutron generator tubes; instrumentation to control processing of irradiated materials; frequency measuring equipment; gravity meters. 39 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 15 PAGENO="0226" 658 Metals, Minerals, Alloys Thereof, Source Materials Thereof and Manufactures Thereof: Anti-friction bearings; source (fertile) and fissionable materials (in addition to those specified in Item 201) ; zirconium; beryllium; magnetic metals; lithium; steel alloys; hafnium; calcium; tritium; niobium and tantalum; magnesium; molybdenum; nickel powder; tungsten; titanium; artificial graphite. Chemicals, Metalloids, Petroleum Products and Rubber Products: Primary explosives and priming compositions; synthetic and super refined hydraulic fluids; deuterium; fluorine; boron; chlorine trifluoride; diethylene triamine; polymeric substances; fluorocarbon compounds and manufactures; silicone fluids and greases; silicon, gallium and indium; filament winding material; high energy liquid fuel; synthetic lubricating oils and greases; syn- thetic rubber. Miscellaneous: Synthetic dielectric film; small arms not designed specifically for military use and ammunition therefor; military smoke, gas, and pyrotechnic projectors; stabilizers for explosives; pneumatic tire casings specially constructed to be bullet proof or to run when deflated; special armored equipment; specialized military training equipment; tear gas equipment; self-contained diving and underwater swimming apparatus, bayonets, firearms silencers, power-controlled searchlights, military construction equipment designed for airborne transport; specialized equipment for examination, testing and manufacture of military equipment; environmental chambers; cryogenic equipment; devices for meas- uring the speed of sound in water. Battle Act Title II List The Title II List covers the same general categories of items as the Title I, Category B List, but the specific items listed are ones of lesser strategic importance. 40 PAGENO="0227" 659 APPENDIX C Trade Controls of Free-World Countries This appendix summarizes the iuttional trade-control procedures of the COCOM countries. Descriptions of the trade controls of other friendly countries were presented in previous Mutual Defense Assist- ance Control Act reports and, since their control procedures have not in most cases undergone substantial revision, they are not repeated in this report. These summaries are concerned primarily with the basic export license and customs control procedures originally established for eco- nomic or financial reasons. Security trade controls have been gen- erally exercised through these basic procedures supplemented, to increase their effectiveness, by Import Certificate-Delivery Verifica- tion (IC/DV) procedures, shipping controls, Transit Authorization Certificate (TAC) procedures, and transaction or financial controls. The summaries which follow describe the main features of these national control systems as they stood June 30, 1967. BELGIUM-LUXEMBOURG License Requirements The legislation which is the basis for import and export controls is contained in a law dated September 11, 1962, which, in general terms, authorizes the regulation of Belgian foreign trade in order to insure the economic stability of the country. The agreement concluded on May 23, 1935, with the Grand Duchy of Luxem- bourg amending the Economic Union Agreement of 1921, established the Belgiun- Luxembourg Administrative Commission with the function of coordinating the regulations in force in both countries concerning the issue of import and export licenses. Pursuant to the 1935 agreement, any recommendation from one of the two Governments to amend or to extend the regulations governing import and export controls must be discussed with the appropriate authorities of the other Government. If an agreement has been concluded in that respect, the new regu- lations are submitted to the Commission which then communicates the pertinent instructions to the Belgian Bureau of Licenses and Quotas, and to the Luxem- bourg Bureau of Licenses. This procedure enables both Governments to carry out the coordination of the import and export license procedures, and thus pro- tect their mutual interests. 41 PAGENO="0228" 660 The foregoing agreements have been amended by a protocol dated January 29, 1963, approved by a law dated January 26, 1965. A royal decree dated October 24, 1962, regulating the import, export and transit of goods, authorized certain ministers to require an import, export or transit license for merchandise specified by them. The ministers may apply the license sy'stem to national goods or to material coming from or destined to such coun- tries as they may determine. The control of exports through licenses can be reinforced by special controls effective during the actual shipping of goods covered by licenses. In order to obtain export licenses in such cases, the exporter must agree to comply with these special controls. These controls are put into effect either to determine the nature of the merchandise which is to be exported, or to insure the direct delivery of a specific commodity to the client abroad. Individuals who make applications for export licenses must specify in a written statement that they are familiar with the pertinent provisions in the regulations concerning the issue of these licenses as well as those concerning foreign exchange operations, and that they agree to comply with them without reservation. They must also acknowledge that they know that licenses are not transferable and that any irregularity in the utilization of these documents will make them liable to prosecution. Exporters of products, the final destination of which is subject to control, must sign a special commitment specifying that the goods they propose to export will be delivered in accordance with statements supplied to the responsible license bureau. In addition to this commitment a statement, either formal or private, is re- quired from the foreign consignee concerning the end-use of the goods in the country of destination. Transit Controls The royal decree of October 24, 1962, previously referred to, authorizes the Minister of Economic Affairs to require a license for such goods as he may determine. The Minister of Economic Affairs may apply this license procedure to goods originating from or destined to such countries as he may determine. Thus the ministerial decree of December 31, 1962, ~peclfies that a license is required for the transportation through Belgian territory of transit goads, spe- cifically listed in the decree, which originate from countries which participate in the TAO system, and which are destined to a Communist area. A license, how- ever, is not required when a participating country has issued a statement which guarantees that a transit permit has been issuecT. Luxembourg published identical ministerial regulations on January 21, 1963. Financial Controls Prior authorization must be obtained for any purchase from or sale to foreign countries made by Belgium or Luxembourg residents. The foreign exchange control is carried out by the Belgium-Luxembourg Foreign Exchange Bureau. Shipping Controls Belgium has adopted measures to prevent Belgian ships from transporting strategic products to Communist China and North Korea. 42 PAGENO="0229" 661 CANADA Authority for the control of exports in Canada is derived from the Export and Import Permits Act, an act of Parliament, which came into effect on June 1, 1954. Permit Requirements The Canadian approach to export control is based on two lists: (1) the Export Control List of strategic commodities for which export permits are required for practically all commercial exports to any destination, except the United States, and (2) the Area Control List of countries, the shipment to which of any goods requires an export permit. The Area Control List corn- prises the countries of the Sino and Soviet areas. General export permits are in effect which enable shipments of a list of nonstrategic items, when of Canadian origin, to be made to countries of the European Soviet area; ship- mnents of casual gift parcels of trivial value to Communist countries; shipments to Canadian diplomatic missions, etc. Canada participates in the international IC/DY system. Transaction Controls Under the Act, Canada has also enacted a form of transaction control whereby it becomes an offense for a resident of Canada to knowingly cause or assist any shipment of strategic goods to be made from Canada or any other place, to a country included in the Area Control List. Transit Controls Regulations respecting transit shipments stipulate that no person shall trans- ship or cause or assist in the transshipment of or accept for transshipment to a country included in the Area Control List any goods included in the Export Con- trol List, unless a Transit Authorization Certificate covering such goods and issued by the exporting country, or by the country of residence of the exporter, has been presented to and endorsed by a Canadian collector of customs or, in time absence of such certificate, approval for the transshipment has been given by the Minister of Trade and Commerce, or by a person authorized by him to do so. An export permit is required for all goods originating outside Canada when tendered for export in the same condition as when imported, without further processing or manufacture in Canada. Goods in transit in bond on a through journey on a billing originating outside of Canada, clearly indicating the ulti- mate destination of the goods to a third country, do not require a Canadian export permit. With certain exceptions, foreign goo(ls passing through Canada to a third country without a through bill of lading require a Canadian export permit. (If such goods represent United States shipments of controlled goods passing through Canada to third countries, they must be covered by a United States export permit.) All Canadian goods having an undeclared ultimate destination require export permits. Shipments of United States goods through Canada must be accompanied by a copy of the United States export declaration authenticated by a United States Collector of Customs. Export controls are administered by the Transportation and Trade Services Branch of the Canadian Department of Trade and Commerce. 43 PAGENO="0230" 662 DENMARK License Requirements Export licenses are required for all commodities, except certain agricultural products, unless the goods are exported to or intended for end-use in Finland, countries which `are members of the European Monetary Agreement, or countries within the dollar area. For the goods enumerated in the below-mentioned Commodity Lists A and B, export licenses are required, irrespective of the country of destination. List A of the Danish export regulations consists of items of strategic signi- ficance. For most of these items the licensing authority is the Import and Ex- port Licensing Office of the Ministry of Commerce, but the Ministry of Justice controls exports of arms, munitions, military equipment, and machinery for the production thereof. List B consists of nonstrategic goods. Export licenses for these are issued by the Import and Export Licensing Office, the Board of Health, the Ministry of Public Works, or the National Bank of Denmark according to the nature of the commodity concerned. Denmark applies IC/DY procedures. Transit Controls The export controls apply to merchandise exported from the Copenhagen free port, including exports from transit or bonded warehouses and goods from free port or private warehouses. They also apply to goods in transit through Den- mark, unless these are transiting on a through bill of ladin~ and there is no change in ultimate destination. In addition, Denmark has adopted the TAC scheme. These control measures thus prevent unauthorized diversion of embargo goods in transit through Denmark. All transit transactions financed by Denmark are subject to control by the National Bank of Denmark if the goods in question are forwarded directly be- tween the countries of origin and destination or are transiting on a through bill of lading. In its administration of these provisions the Bank observes the same rules as the export control authorities with which the Bank cooperates closely in this field. Exchange Controls The National Bank of Denmark exercises controls over all transactions in foreign exchange but has given the authorized exchange dealers a general au- thorization to perform nearly all current payments. Earnings in foreign currencies must be repatriated and sold to the authorized exchange dealers unless special exceptions are made. Shipping Controls An informal arrangement has been made by the Danish Government with Danish shipping companies to prevent the carrying in Danish vessels of strategic goods to Communist China and North Korea. This `arrangement is implemented under a voluntary agreement with Danish shipowners. FRANCE License Requirements Export licenses are required for over 20 percent of the conirnodities identified in the French tariff nomenclature. Governmental authority for this control is contained in various decrees, the latest dfitecl Nôvemb~r ~O, 1944. Ph~~ doer~o~ 44 PAGENO="0231" 663 permit addition to or removal from the list of controlled commodities merely by publication of a notice in the Journal Officici. The list of strategic commodities subject to export licensing is publi.shed periodically in the Journal Officici. Applications for license to export are submitted by French exporters to the French Ministry of Industry, which passes themmi on to the Ministry of Finance and Economic Affairs. On occasion they are examined by appropriate technical committees and personnel in other agencies, in the case of strategic products the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. At the time the application for an export license is submitted, the exporter may be instructed by the competent technical ministry to submit a sample, photograph, blueprint, drawing, or other detailed description of the commodity in question. These data are used in determining the advisability of issuing the export license requested. At the port of exit, random samples of actual exports may be extracted by customs officials and these are compared by competent technicians with the original data submitted with the license application. This procedure is designed to assure in an mnammy instances as practical that the commodity exported is identical with the commodity for which the export license is issued. In the event fraudulent action on the part of the exporter is found and can be legally established, the exporter is subject to confiscation of the goods in question and fines ranging upward to four times the value of the shipment plus penal servitude. The control system in operation in France makes it possible to block or encourage exports to any destination of commodities requiring export licenses. France employs IC/DV procedures and, when appropriate, conducts end-use checks on exports of strategic goods. Transit Controls On December 30, 1954, and January 12, 1955, the French Government pub- lished new regulations effective respectively on the 1st and 15th of January, 1955, concerning the regulation of imports, exports, and reexports of a certain number of product,s which enter France under transit status. In essence, these regu- lations state that the products affected cannot be diverted to certain specified countries (which comprise the Soviet-oriented areas.), if the country of origin participates in the TAC scheme unless the country of origin authorizes the change in destination. Financial Controls Under the revised Exchange Control Regulations effective January 31, 1t~7, the franc is now a fully convertible currency. French residents and businesses, including French companies (whether or not controlled by foreigners), and the French branches of foreign companies may maintain bank accounts in France or abroad in foreign currencies, may make payments abroad in francs or in foreign currencies for all sorts of expenses and in general may freely transfer funds abroad and hold property abroad without restriction. Shipping Controls In order to avoid the transport on French vessels of strategic products to Coma- munist China, the French Government asked owners controlling ships serving China not to transport strategic goods unless these are covered by an export license or a document issued by the French Government indicating Communist China as the final destination. 45 PAGENO="0232" 664 FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY AND WEST BERLIN License Requirements Present regulations governing trade controls in the Federal Republic went into effect on September 1, 1961. They are contained in two documents, the Foreign Commerce Ordinance (Aussenwirtschaftsverordnung or AWV) of August 22, 1961, and the Foreign Commerce Licensing Jurisdiction Ordinance (Verordnung zur Regelung von, Zustaendigkeiten `in~ Au~ssenwirtsc1iaftsverkeJtr) of August 7, 1961. These regulations find their legal basis in the Foreign Commerce Law (Aussenwirtsohaftsgesetz) of April 28, 1961. Section 7 of this Law, entitled "Protection of Security and of Foreign Interests", provides the specific authority for security trade controls. Export licenses (Au~fn1ir-genehmigwngen) are required for all goods listed on the 0000M Strategic Materials Embargo, Munitions, and Atomic Energy Lists as well as for documentary data required in the production of these goods. Li- censing requirements do not apply to goods included in the C000M lists if valued at DM 1000 ($250) or less for export to certain free-world countries. A list of permissible destinations is given in Section II of the Annex to the Foreign Commerce Law. An application for Export License can be executed only by the exporting person or firm, `and when COCOM-controlled commodities are involved, the license appli- cation must be accompanied by an Import Certificate (Unbedenklie1~k-eitsbestaeti- gung) from another country recognizing COCOM controls or other satisfactory documentation concerning the intended end-use of the commodities when non- C000M countries are involved in the transaction. German authorities do not always ask that proof of end-use be obtained follow- ing the export from the Federal Republic of a COCOM-controlled commodity. They are, however, authorized to do so by a special set of rules published in a circular of the Federal Ministry for Economics (Runderlass Au,,ssenwirtschaft No. 39/61). Acceptable proof of end-use consists of either a Delivery Verification (Wareneingangsbescheinigwng) from a country recognizing C000M controls or other satisfactory documentation from non-COCOM countries. The circular also describes in detail the conditions under which the Federal Government will issue its own ICs and DVs for use by other 0000M countries. In general, the request for either of these documents from an American exporter is sufficient to cause their issuance. All imports into the Federal Republic or West Berlin from Sino and Soviet areas require licenses. Federal authorities may require a certificate of origin in the case of ostensibly non-Communist imports which they may suspect as being originally from Communist areas. Transit Controls Goods on COCOM lists which are bound for free-world destinations are not permitted to transit the Federal Republic unless accompanied by an Import Certificate from a country of destination recognizing COCOM controls or other satisfactory documentation concerning the intended end-use of the goods if bound for a country not recognizing COCOM controls. COCOM-controlled goods originating in countries adhering to OOCOM transit regulations and destined for Communist countries other than Yugoslavia 46 PAGENO="0233" 665 will not be permitted to transit the Federal Republic unless accompanied by Transit Authorization Certificates-TAOs (D urchfuhrbcreClitif/UflgSSClICifle). C000M-controlled goods shipped through the Federal Republic to these same destinations from Sweden or Switzerland must be accompanied by a properly authenticated copy of a Swedish or Swiss export permit. TACs and Swedish or Swiss export permits are recognized as valid for transit purposes only for a l)eriod of four months following the goods' departure from the shipping country. Financial Controls German residents are prohibited from acting as middlemen in certain types of triangular transactions unless they obtain a Transit License (Transitltaadelsf1C- nchmigung). The type of triangular deal subject to licensing is that involving Sino and Soviet areas and COCOM-controlled commodities which are not physi- cally located in the Federal Republic or West Berlin. The license is necessary in transactions involving controlled goods either bound for or sold by Communist areas. The Federal Government would not, of course, license a transaction in- volving 0000M-controlled commodities bound for the Communist areas unless a C000M exception had been obtained. Shipping Controls Since October 7, 1962, all German ship chartering involving contracts with Communist areas or Cuba have been subject to licensing. The chartering of Communist ships-and, since March 3, 1965, the chartering of Cuban ships-by persons doing business in Germany is subject to licensing as well. The installation of COCOM-controlled commodities on ships and aircraft owned by Communist-controlled areas also requires licensing. Soviet Zone of Germany and East Berlin Trade between the Federal Republic and the Soviet Zone of Germany and East Berlin is controlled through separate laws and regulations under which all shipments of goods in either direction are subject to special licensing and special documentation. GREECE License Requirements Export licenses are required for all strategic commodities and for certain nomi- strategic commodities for which export quotas have, been established. For non- strategic shipments, licenses are issued by the Bank of Greece in accordance with directives from the Greek Foreign Trade Board and the Ministry of Commerce. In the case of countries with which Greece has bilateral trade agreements (which includes the Soviet-oriented countries), such licenses are limited to the quanti- ties specified in the respective agreements. For strategic shipments, including those to the Soviet-oriented countries, licenses must be obtained from the Minis- try of Commerce. Greece applies IC/DY procedures. Transit Controls Transit shipments of strategic commodities must be licensed by the Ministry of Commerce prior to being reexported or transshipped. 47 PAGENO="0234" 666 Financial Controls Foreign exchange proceeds must he surrendered to the Bank of Greece. Shipping Controls In response to a recommendation made on October 1, 1962, by the Greek Gov- ernment, Greek shipowners began to refuse charters for shipments to rind froni Cuba. On March 20, 1963, a royal decree became effective which prohibits trans- port of any cargo to Cuba by Greek-flag vessels, except under charters signed prior to the decree. Another royal decree effective September 27, 1963, extended the prohibition to include the carriage of aiiy cargo from Cuba. On March 12, 1966, another royal decree became effective which prohibits transport of any cargo to or from North Viet-Nam by Greek-flag vessels. The transport of strategic items to Communist China or North Korea has been banned since .1953, although on October 10, 1958, the Greek Government rescinded a provision which had prohibited Greek-flag ships from calling at ports in those two countries. The Greek foreign investment law (No. 2637 of 1953) provides that foreign vessels transferred to the Greek flag may only be resold to countries named in the instrument of approval executed at the time of the transfer of the vessel to Greek registry. So far, such instruments have not included Soviet-oriented countries. With only minor exceptions, the sale to other countries of Greek-flag ships not covered by an instrument under law 2687 requires the prior approval of the Greek Government. Ship repairs are subject to export licensing under the procedures covering transit shipments. Current bunkering controls require licensing by the Bank of Greece with respect to payment in foreign exchange for the value of fuel and by customs authorities for removal from customs precincts. ITALY License Requirements All commodities listed in the Tabella Esport (Export List) effective October 1, 1962, require an export license for all destinations. Export licenses are issued by the Ministry of Finance upon the authorization of the Ministry of Foreign Trade. All items internationally accepted for embargo are included in the Tabella Esport. Commodities not listed in the Tabclla Esport are exempt from license for export to all destinations, Sino and `Soviet areas included, with the exception of East Germany. Exports to East Germany are regulated by the National Foreign Trade Institute (ICE). Licenses are required for exports to Sino and Soviet areas of all commodities listed in the Tabefla Esport. Licenses are required for imports from the Sino and Soviet areas of all commodities listed in the Tabdfla B Import (Import List B) effective January 31, 1964. This provides for a lower level of liberalization than the list of all other areas of the world, the Tabefla A Import (Import List A) effective December 3, 1962. 48 PAGENO="0235" 667 The formulation of export control policy and the administration of the export licensing system are the primary responsibilities of the Ministry of Foreign Trade. This Ministry is advised by a special interministerial committee which screens all export license applications for goods subject to strategic control. Italy employs IC/DY procedures and, when considered appropriate, carries out end-use checks on exports of strategic goods. Import certificates are issued by the Ministry of Foreign Trade and are granted only to firms cleared by the Ministry for foreign trade activity. Delivery verifications are issued by the Customs Service of the Ministry of Finance. Certain strategic imports and certain raw materials destined for reexport as finished products are kept under special customs supervision until their actual consumption in the manufacturing process. Transit Controls A Transit Authorization Certificate is required for shipments passing in transit through Italy of goods listed in the Tabclla Esport coming from countries par- ticipating in the TAC scheme and destined for any of the Soviet-oriented countries. Financial Controls Financial control over all export transactions is maintained through the licensing system and through implementation of existing exchange control regulations which require bank validations covering all export shipments of commercial size. Shipping Controls Control over Italian-flag vessels carrying goods to the Sino and Soviet areas is exercised through voluntary informal cooperation between the Italian authori- ties and the shipping companies. Penalties Penalties that may be imposed under Italian law for violations of export control regulations include imprisonment up to 3 months, fines up to 40,000 lire, and confiscation of the merchandise involved. Such penalties, in case of currency violations, may be supplemented by fines as high as five times the value of the merchandise. Persons and firms under investigation for illegal expoit trans- actions are denied foreign trading privileges. Irregularities under the customs law may be punished by fines from 2,000 to 20,000 lire, while other infractions may incur the penalties contemplated by the penal code. JAPAN License Requirements Licenses from the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry are required for exports of any commodity on the Japanese export control list, which includes all items internation~illy accepted for embargo control. End-use checks are made also on suspicious exports of strategic items, and IC/DY procedures have been utilized since April 1, 1953. 49 PAGENO="0236" 668 Transit Controls Intransit cargo is offloaded under customs supervision and is normally kept in a bonded warehouse or other area under the complete control of customs officials. Japan applies TAO procedures to certain offloaded intransit cargo destined for Soviet-oriented countries exported from any country cooperating in the TAO scheme, or which was exported from any country if the principal in the transaction is a resident of a 000GM country. Financial Controls The Japanese Government closely controls the extension of medium- and long-term credits. These controls, however, are not directly related to security measures. Shipping Controls Since Japan does not engage in strategic trade with Oommunist Ohina or North Korea, it is highly unlikely that Japanese ships carry strategic goods to those areas. Japanese shipowners have withdrawn their ships from the Ouban and North Vietnamese trade. THE NETHERLANDS License Requirements Individual export licenses are required for the export of all strategic goods. These licenses are issued by the (Jentrale Dienst voor In- en Uitvoer (Oentral Import and Export Office) in The Hague. The JO/DY system is applied extensively. In oases involving the export of strategic goods to countries not participating in the JO/DY system, the exporter can be obliged, before the license is granted, to prove that the goods will be imported into the country mentioned in the export license as the country of final destination and is often obliged to prove that the goods have been imported into that country. Finally, when a shipment leaves the country, the customs authorities have the right to satisfy themselves that the goods to be exported are identical with the description given in the export license, and that the direction in which the ship- ment is being sent is not incompatible with the final destination mentioned in the license. Transit Controls Pursuant to royal decree regarding the transit control of strategic commodities, strategic goods sent from specifically mentioned countries or shipped on the behalf of residents of some of these countries, which after unloading pass in transit through the Netherlands, are subject to control over their destination. Financial Controls All financial transactions by Netherlands residents involving payments to or received from a party abroad are subject to foreign exchange licenses. Through the means of these licenses, it is possible to control triangular transactions in which a Netherlands resident is involved as a middleman. Within the framework of these controls, the JO/DY system is also applied. 50 PAGENO="0237" 669 Shipping Controls Voyage controls have been instituted which are aimed at preventing the car- riage of certain strategic commodities by Netherlands ships to Communist China and North Korea except pursuant to special permission. After an appeal was made by the Netherlands Government to the N'etherlands shipowners to refrain from trading with Cuba and North Viet-Nam, the Netherlands shipowners volun- tarily withdrew their ships from the Ouban and North Viet-Nam trade. NORWAY License Requirements Export licenses are required for the export of all commodities to countries outside the "export free-list area." Sino and Soviet countries are not included in this area, and exports destined for any of these countries are subject to licensing. Since Norway does not recognize East Germany, trade `arrangements with that area are made by a non-official agency. For shipments to countries in the "export free-list area" certain strategic and other goods produced in Norway require export licenses. The licensing authorities using existing powers can prevent, for security reasons, the export of any controlled item. Norway applies IC/DV procedures. Transit Controls Goods which are to pass through the territory of Norway may be reexported without license only if it is clearly stated by their conveying documents that the goods are going straight to the foreign destination. If the reexport does not take place within 90 days, a Norwegian export license must be secured. The destina- tion listed on the original documents must remain the same, and the goods may not be transformed in any way during their stay in the country. The customs authority applies a control to that effect. An export license is required for all commodities in transit to a Soviet-oriented country even though the reexport takes place within 90 days. There are no free port areas in Nor~ay. Financial Controls Exchange controls are maintained by the Government through the Bank of Norway. Transfers of capital to and from Norway are subject to license by the Bank. Receipts of foreign exchange as a result of exports and/or of invisible transactions must be surrendered by residents to the Bank of Norway or to authorized foreign exchange banks. Norway established nonresident kroner convertibility for current transactions on December 29, 1958. Bilateral clearing accounts with maximum swing credits are retained only for the Eastern Zone of Germany. Shipping Controls The Norwegian Foreign `Office announced publicly in April 1953, that the Norwegian war risk insurance club had refused to insure Norwegian vessels delivering strategic articles to Communist China and North Korean ports. The Foreign Office also announced that Norwegian ships had not violated the United Nations Resolution of May 18, 1951, prohibiting the shipment of strategic material to Communist China and North Korea. Norwegian shipowners have voluntarily withdrawn their ships from the Cuban and North Vietnamese trade. 51 PAGENO="0238" 670 PORTUGAL License Requirements Exports to all foreign destinations are subject to prior registration or license control. Exports to Portugal's overseas provinces have been exempt from the license requirement since August 14, 1962. Licenses are not approved for export of strategic materials to Soviet-oriented areas. Licenses for export of strategic material to other areas are granted only after assurance has been obtained that the goods will be imported into the country mentioned in the export licenses as the country of final destination. Portugal implements the IC/DY procedures. Import and export licensing activities are exercised by the Division of Foreign Trade of the Ministry of Economy and by other delegated agencies. In the Portuguese overseas provinces imports, exports, and reexports are subject to license and exchange control by designated agencies of the provincial governments. Transit Controls - Intransit cargo is offloaded under customs supervision and is stored under the complete control of customs officials. If the goods are not forwarded within 60 days a Portuguese reexport license must be secured. The destination listed on the original documents must remain the same, and the goods may not be trans- formed in any way during their stay in the country. A reexport license is required for all commodities in transit to a Soviet-oriented country even though the reexport takes place within 60 days. Financial Controls The financial aspects of trade control are coordinated with the Ministry of Finance through the Bank of Portugal. Imports and exports are subject to exchange controls, implemented through the prior registration process. Shipping Controls Portugal does not exercise voyage licensing, but Portuguese vessels plying be- tween Europe and Macau have been instructed not to accept cargo for Macau unless it is covered by a Macau Import Certificate. There are no Portuguese- flag shipping services to European Communist ports. TURKEY License Requirements Regulations governing Turkey's imports and exports are subject to revision every 6 months. According to regulations which became effective July 2, 1966, licenses are required for the export to any destination of wheat, barley, oats, corn, products of wheat and oats, margarine, cotton seed, sunflower seed, sesame seed, soybeans, molybdenum, wolfram, scrap metals, articles made of or con- taining precious metals and stones. All exports through the southern and eastern borders are subject to price control and registration. Exports of the following goods are subject to regis- tration: Cotton, mohair, wool, goat hair, skins of small-head livestock, oil seeds, dried figs, olive oil, sponges, bird seeds, vetchling, licorice, leguminous seeds, walnuts, mineral ores, marble, filberts, seedless raisins, tobacco, live animals, pistachios, bran, oil seed cakes, guts, walnut logs. Exportation of the commodities included under the Liberation Lists and the List of Import Goods Subject to Allocation are subject to licensing, as are exports 52 PAGENO="0239" 671 under the provisions of bilateral Trade and Payment Agreements. An export license is required, in effect, for all reexports. All exports for other than dollar and convertible European Monetary Agreement currencies must be licensed. Turkey applies IC/DV procedures with respect to the shipment of strategic commodities. Transit Controls There is almost no transit trade through Turkey. A transit agreement with Iran permits shipment in sealed cars to and from the port of Trabzon. Any other transit of goods across Turkey must be arranged on an ad hoc basis with the countries concerned. Financial Controls Strict exchange controls are maintained by the Government through the Ministry of Finance and the Central Bank. Exporters are required to provide export declarations for examination and endorsement by the Customs Office. Shipping establishments and agencies which are required to draw up bills of lading are obliged to deliver the bills of lading to the authorized bank for for- warding to the purchaser. The bank examines the correctness, not only of these bills of lading, but of the invoices, certificates of origin, insurance policies and all other export documents. Regulations stipulate that the countervalue in foreign exchange must be imported within three months of the date of actual export of goods of any kind and must be sold to an authorized bank within ten days of the date on which it is acquired. UNITED KINGDOM License Requirements The export control system in the United Kingdom is similar to but not identical with that of the United States. It is administered by the Board of Trade. Although the present `system grew `out of measures originally promulgated at the start of World War II, its primary purpose now is the restriction of the flow of strategic goods to undesirable destinations. The United Kingdom security trade control program was instituted in 1947. The United Kingdom export control mechanism operates in the following manner: Export control orders which detail the items subject to control are Statutory Instruments, and revisions to them are issued through H.M. Stationery Office. The current orders provide that certain specified goods are controlled to all destinations; certain other specified goods are controlled to all destinations other than the British Commonwealth, the Republic of Ireland, the Republic of South Africa, or the United States of America, and all goods are controlled to Rhodesia. Strict control is maintained over items which are prohibited exportation to certain areas, as, for instance, aircraft, firearms, ammunition, and atomic mate- rials. The exportation of a range of goods of strategic importance to the Sino and Soviet areas is prohibited. The United Kingdom has effectively implemented IC/DV procedures. Transit Controls The United Kingdom has had in effect since November 1951 a system whereby certain items arriving from other countries are subject to transshipment control. Individual licenses are required for all of the items on the licensing list before 53 PAGENO="0240" 672 any of the goods, after being landed in the United Kingdom, can be transshipped to any destination other than the British Commonwealth, Ireland, and the United States. The present control is operated over all goods embargoed to the Sino and Soviet areas. In administering the control, the British authorities normally grant licenses when they are satisfied that the goods will not be diverted to the Soviet- oriented areas, Communist China, etc., contrary to the wishes of the exporting country. The United Kingdom also cooperates fully in the implementation of the TAC scheme. Transaction Controls As one of the reinforcement measures to strengthen security controls agreed when the Soviet area embargo list was reviewed in 1954, the United Kingdom introduced a control on merchanting transactions operative from January 7, 1955. This control prohibits the disposal by persons in, or ordinarily resident in, the United Kingdom of specified strategic goods which are situated outside the United Kingdom to any authority of, or person in, the Sino and Soviet areas, or to any other person if the person disposing of the goods has reasonable cause to believe that the goods will be imported directly or indirectly into the Sino and Soviet areas. The goods covered by the control are those which are subject to embargo for Soviet-oriented countries. UNITED STATES Export Controls in General The Department of Commerce, under the Export Control Act of 1949, as amended and extended, is responsible for controls over nearly all commercial exports from the United States. The Department of State is responsible for controls over the export of arms, ammunition, and implements of war; the Atomic Energy Commission administers controls over the export of major atomic items; and the Department of the Treasury administers controls over the export of gold and narcotics. Other government departments administer controls over the export of a few other commodities, e.g., the Department of Agriculture controls tobacco seed and plant exports. Export Controls of the Department of Commerce The export control regulations administered by the Department of Commerce are contained in the Comprehensive Export Schedule, published annually by the Bureau of International Commerce (BIC) of the Department of Commerce. Changes in these regulations are published regularly by BIC in Current Export Bulletins. These publications must be consulted to determine the applicable re- quirements for the exportation of any given commodity to a specific destination. Quarterly Reports submitted by the Secretary of Commerce to the President and to the Congress under the Export Control Act review the activities of the Depart- ment of Commerce in carrying out the Act, including major policy changes. With two exceptions, most commercial exports from the United States, its territories, and possessions are prohibited unless the Department of Commerce has either issued a "validated license" or established a "general license" permitting such shipments. The two exceptions are: exports from the United States to its 54 PAGENO="0241" 673 territories and possessions, and most exports to Canada for internal consumption. Commercial exports not subject to the jurisdiction of the Department of Com- merce are under the control of other Departments as set forth in the section above entitled "Export Controls in General." A validated export license is a formal document issued to an exporter by the Department of Commerce which authorizes export within specific limitations. A general license is a broad authorization issued by the Department of Commerce which permits certain exports ~mder specified conditions. A determination can be made as to whether a validated license or general license (usually General License G-DEST) applies to a given commodity for a given destination by consulting the Commodity Control List. This list is maintained on a current basis in the Com- prehensive Export Schedule. Export controls are maintained for three purposes-"national security," "foreign policy," and "short supply". National security controls, and short-supply controls as required, are always coordinated to reflect U.S. foreign policy and international responsibilities. In addition, the 1965 amendment to the Act in- cluded a policy statement that the United States opposes restrictive trade practices or boycotts by foreign countries against other countries friendly to the United States. National security controls are instituted to provide control of exports from the standpoint of their significance to the security of the United States. They include an embargo on exports to Communist China, North Korea, the Communist- controlled area of Viet-Nam, and Cuba, as well as broad controls over exports to the U.S.S. R. and other Eastern European areas. Controls to free-world countries apply to a highly selected list of commodities and technical data to prevent their unauthorized diversion or reexport to the foregoing countries, thus frustrating U.S. controls over shipments to them. Commerce regulations have permitted exports to Poland since 1957, and to Romania since 1964, of many commodities without a validated export license. However, strategic commodities which are under export control to free-world destinations and a group of other commodities of some strategic value-including a few specialized agricultural items, machine to~ils, petroleum and petroleum products, and certain electronic equipment-continue to require a validated license to these two countries. Short-supply controls are used only when it becomes necessary to protect the domestic economy from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the inflationary impact of abnormal foreign demand. Such controls are usually exer- cised by means of export programs or quotas fixed by the Secretary of Commerce. Currently, short-supply controls are maintained over copper and related products. In order to prevent unauthorized transshipment abroad of commodities of U.S. origin, the Department of Commerce has regulations covering the movement of such commodities after they leave the United States. These "destination control" i~egulations prohibit the reexport of such goods from the country of original destination to a third country unless the commodities can be sent directly to the third country under a general license or prior written authorization has been ob- tained from the Commerce Department. The export control regulations also restrict vessels, aircraft, or other carriers from delivering goods of U.S. origin to unauthorized destinations. Moreover, the United States participates in* the international IC/DV systems. I Other than commodities related to nuclear weapons, nuclear explosive devices or nuclear testing, and certain technical data. 55 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 16 PAGENO="0242" 674 In view of the proximity and trade relationships of Hong Kong and Macau with Communist China, validated licenses are required for exportations to Hong Kong and Macau (Country Group X) 2 for a wider range of commodities than are under validated license to the rest of the free world, with the exception of shipments of certain nonstrategic commodities valued at $100 or less. In addition, proposed shipments of strategic commodities are carefully scruti- nized to assure that the goods will not be transshipped or diverted. To prevent frustration of U.S. export controls, Department of Commerce regu1ations also provide that parts, components, materials, or other commodities exported from the United States and used abroad to manufacture or produce a foreign-made end-product are subject to the export control laws of the United States. The De- partment of Commerce exercises vigilance over exports and reexports of these commodities in order to prevent such exports or reexports from being used for a purpose detrimental to the national security or foreign policy of the United States. Transit Controls Commodities of foreign origin which transit the United States for shipment to Country Groups W, X, Y, and Z2 require a validated export license, except in those instances where the shipments, if of U.S. origin, could be made under the provisions of general licenses applicable to the respective destinations. The United States participates fully in the International Transit Authorization Certificate scheme. Shipping Controls Department of Commerce Transportation Order T-1 prohibits any U.S.-regis- tere~1 vessel or aircraft from carrying to or discharging at any destination in Coun- try Groups X, Y or Z (1) items not identified by the symbol B in the last column of the Commodity Control List, (2) arms, ammunition, and implements of war or (3) fissionable material, unless specifically authorized by the appropriate U.S. Govern- ment agency. Department of Commerce Transportation Order T-2 prohibits U.S. vessels and aircraft from transporting any commodities directly or indirectly to Communist China, North Korea, the Communist-controlled area of Viet-Nam or other areas under Chinese Communist control. It also prohibits them from calling at any point in Communist China, North Korea, the Communist-controlled area of Viet-Nam, or other areas under Chinese Communist control. A validated license is required for delivery in U.S. ports of specified types of petroleum and petroleum products to a foreign vessel or aircraft, if the foreign carrier has called at any point under Far Eastern Communist control during the 180 days preceding the date on which such commodities are to be laden aboard the vessel or aircraft, or if the carrier will call at a port under Far Eastern Communist control or will carry any commodities regardless of origin, destined directly or indirectly for any such point, within a period of 120 days in the case of a vessel, or 30 days in the case of an aircraft. If a carrier is registered in or under charter to a country in Groups W, Y, or Z, or is under charter to a national of a country in Groups W, Y, or Z, a validated license must be obtained from the Department of 2 Country Group W: Poland and Romania. Country Group X: Hong Kong and Macau. Country Group Y: Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany (including Soviet Sector of Berlin), Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Outer Mongolia, and U.S.S.R. Country Group Z: Communist China, North Korea, Communist-controlled area of Viet-Nam, and Cuba. 56 PAGENO="0243" 675 Commerce prior to loading aboard the carrier any petroleum and petroleum prod- ucts and certain equipment and spare parts. Department of Commerce regulations also deny petroleum and petroleum prod- ucts under general license Ship Stores to any foreign vessel departing from the United States which is scheduled to call at Cuba on its current voyage or which is determined to be ineligible to carry U.S-financed cargo because of having called at a Cuban port since January 1, 1963. Under these regulations, any foreign vessel determined to be ineligible may not be serviced unless a validated export license is issued. American petroleum companies at certain foreign ports are prohibited without a Treasury Department authorization from bunkering any vessel bound for a port in Communist. China, North Korea, or the Communist-controlled area of Viet-Nam, or which is carrying goods destined for such a port. Similar restrictions apply to the bunkering by these companies of vessels returning from ports in Communist China, North Korea, and the Communist-controlled area of Viet-Nam. Financial and Transaction Controls-Treasury Department The Foreign Assets Control Regulations, administered by the Treasury Depart- ment, block the assets here of Communist China, North Korea, North Viet-Nam, and their nationals, and prohibit unlicensed dealings by Americans and by foreign subsidiaries of U.S. firms with Communist China, North Korea, North Viet- Nam, or their nationals. In addition, the Cuban Assets Control Regulations block assets here of Cuba and prohibit unlicensed dealings with Cuban nationals. The regulations prevent the use of U.S. financial facilities* by those countries and their nationals. These regulations also prohibit the unlicensed importation of goods of Chinese Communist, North Korean, North Vietnamese, or Cuban origin. The Transaction Control Regulations of the Treasury Department prohibit Americans, including foreign subsidiaries of U.S. firms, from participating in the purchase or sale of certain strategic commodities for ultimate shipment from any country outside the United States to the Soviet-oriented countries. Attempts to commit the prohibited acts are also covered. 57 PAGENO="0244" 676 APPENDIX D Statistical Tables TABLE 1. Free-World Trade With Communist Areas, 1965-66 TABLE 2. Total Free-World Trade and Free-World Trade With Communist Areas, 1947-66 TABLE 3A. Free-World Exports to Communist Areas, by Regions, 1964-66 TABLE 3B. Free-World Imports From Communist Areas, by Re- gions, 1964-66 TABLE 3C. Exports of Selected Free-World Countries to the World and to Communist Areas, 1964-66 TABLE 3D. Imports of Selected Free-World Countries From the World and From Communist Areas, 1964-66 TABLE 4. Trade of Free-World and COCOM Countries With Communist Areas, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1952, 1959, and 1962-66 TABLE 5A. Exports of the Free World and European COCOM Countries to Communist Areas, by Selected Com- modities and Commodity Groups, 1964-65 TABLE 5B. Imports of the Free World and European C000M Countries From Communist Areas, by Selected Commodities and Commodity Groups, 1964-65 TABLE 6A. United States Trade With Communist Areas, 1938, 1948, and 1963-66 TABLE 6B. United States Exports to Communist Areas, by Prin- cipal Commodities, 1965-66 TABLE 6C. United States Imports From Communist Areas, by Principal Commodities, 1965-66 TABLE 7A. Trade of Free World and of Communist Areas With Cuba, 1959-66 TABLE 7B. Trade of Free World and of U.S.S.R. With Cuba, by Principal Commodities, 1963-65 TABLE 8A. Trade of Free World, Communist Areas in Eastern Europe, and Cuba With North Viet-Nam, 1963-66 TABLE 8B. Trade of Free World and of U.S.S.R. With North Viet-Nam, by Principal Commodities, 1963-65 58 PAGENO="0245" 677 TABLE 1.-FREE-WORLD TRADE WITH COMMIJNIST AREAS, 1965-66 (Millions of dollars) Period Total Eastern Europe and Commu- nist Asia 1 Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, exclud- ing U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Commu- fist China Free-world exports (f.o.b.) 1965 1966 2 Percentage change Free-world imports (elf.) 1965 2 1966 2 Percentage change 7, 667. 7 8,508. 7 +11.0 8,097. 6 9,047. 1 +11. 7 6,296. 3 6,967.0 +10.7 6,538.8 7, 166.3 +9.6 3,546. 9 4,198.2 +18.4 3,590.2 3,990.9 +11.2 2,749. 4 2,768.8 +. 7 2,948.7 3,175. 4 +7.7 1,306. 6 1,494.4 +14.4 1,503. 5 1,811.3 +20.5 1 Includes trade with Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam, where data are available. 2 Preliminary and incomplete. GENERAL N0TE.-Unless otherwise noted, the term "Communist Areas" includes the following: Eastern Europe-Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Soviet Zone of Germany, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and the U.S.S.R.; Asia-Communist China, for which data since 1949 refer (as far as possible) to Mainland China, Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, and Tibet; Outer Mongolia; North Korea, beginning 1951; North Viet-Nam, beginning 1955. For purposes of this report, the term "free-world" includes Yugoslavia and Cuba. Source for all tables: International Trade Analysis Division, Bureau of Inter- national Commerce, U.S. Department of Commerce. 59 PAGENO="0246" Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co CC CC CC Co -ICC CC CC CC 0 Co 00-I 0 Co 000 ~ CC CC CC 000 Co 00-I -10000CC CC CCI 00CC ~ 000 0 - 00 Co Co CC 0CC Co CCI Co Co Co CO Co Co Co Co Co CO Co Co Co Co Co Co Co ~CC~Co~-4CC~CCtCCC0Co00-4 00400CC CC ~ ~ CC CC CC CC CCCC CC0-'C--'C~CC CC rio ~CQ - ~ -~ ~Q~CII - CCC> ~ CoC~ CC ~ 0 C ~ ~> CC >40 ~ ~ t~i2 <, >0C~ 0 t>i~ CC CC ~ 00 CC CC C> C * CC 0 000CC CC CC ~;r>~- 0 0 *~ j2~ III tlj CC C-lb &~CC CC~ F~trj~ ~ - CCcC CC 00= z;o ~> C 0C~ C0004CCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCC>CC~CCCCCCCC -400CC CC ~ ~ CC CC CC CC CCCCCCCCCC>-'CCCCC->C I-'CC 00CC CC 00 4CC CC Co ~ CC CC CC CC CC ~ CC ~ CC Co CC CC CC CC Co CC CC 0 Co CC CC00000CC0CC0CCCC0Co~1CoCCCCCC~4OO 0 CC C0 0 C0 tli CCj 0 i~h1j CC~1. ~ c"~j 0 C0 tTJ a 0 CC 00CC CC CC CC IC CCCCCCC-CC CC CC Co 00CC 00 ~ CC CC -C CC CC ~ CC Co 00-I Co Co 0-I Co Co CC CC CoO ~ Co Co CC -100CC 0 CoO ~ CC CC 00CC 4CC 4 CC 0000CC ~ CC4 ~ -40 Co CC CC CC CC 0000CC Co CC CC CC 0CC CC Co 00CC 0 Co 0 Co CC00CC~C~CCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCC>-~CCCCCC CC CC 400CC 00CC 00 CC -I ~ 000CC CC CC CC CC 0CC ~ 0000CC ~ CC 0CC CC CC 0 ~ 4 CC 400CC CC 0 CC >4 0 CC CC CC CC CC ~00CC00~CCCCCC~CC 0000CC CC CC ~ CC CC CC CC CC CC 0CC CC ~ -000CC CC CC CC CC Co CC Co ~ 00CC 00CC 41 Co CC CC CC CC CC CCCCCCCCCCCC 0-'CCCCCC ~ CCCC 000000CC CC 0000 00 3 Co Co 00 ~00CCCCCI~ CC Co 00000000CC CC CC CC 0 Co ~ 0000CC-ICC CCCC Co Co 00CC 0000CC ~ CC 4 Co CC 4 ~ 0000 4 CC CC CC 4 CC ~ 00CC 000 ~ CC 4 -I Co -I 000 Co CCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCC CC~CCO~CC~CI Co CCCC -ICC Co CC 00 Co CC CC -ICC CC 4 00 ~ 00000000 ~ CC Co Co CC 00-400CC 00CC ~ 000 ~00CCCC>~CoCo0Co00tCCCCC>~CC CCCCCCCCCC PAGENO="0247" 679 TABLE 3A.-FREE-WORLD EXPORTS TO COMMUNIST AREAS, BY REGIONS, 1964-66 (Millions of dollars) Exports to ~ Exporting region ~ and year Total Eastern Europe and Communist Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Conunu- fist China Exports, total 1964 1965 1966 2 COCOM countries, total 1964 1965 6,814.9 7, 667.7 8,508. 7 5,732.4 6,296.3 6,967. 0 3, 150. 6 3,546.9 4, 198.2 2,581.8 2,749.4 2,768.8 1,045. 2 1,306. 6 1,494.4 3,515. 2 3, 674.9 3, 045. 2 2,982.2 1,848.9 1,993. 1 1, 196.3 989. 1 443. 0 655.8 1966 EUROPEAN COCOM countries, total 4, 598.4 3, 660.2 2, 530. 1 1, 130. 1 908. 2 1964 2,220.3 2, 044.7 1,469.7 575. 0 165.9 1965 2, 676. 6 2,347. 1 1,754.9 592.2 313.3 1966 OTHER EUROPE, total of 8 countries 3,264. 6 2,823.5 2, 245. 7 577.8 422. 0 1964 1, 044.8 1, 012.5 572.5 440. 0 32. 0 1965 1,323.4 1,280. 1 732.3 547.8 41.7 1966 NEAR EAST, total of 14 countries 1964 1,396. 3 403.9 1,334.4 347.8 790. 5 200.5 543.9 147.3 60.9 54.9 1965 492.9 408.9 220.7 188. 2 83. 2 1966 2 494. 6 425.3 227.2 198. 1 68. 1 AFRICA, total of 24 countries 1964 152.3 113.3 75.7 37. 6 39. 0 1965 198.5 147.8 85.3 62.5 50.7 1966 2 180.4 150.4 98.6 51.8 29.9 FAR EAST, except Japan, total of 13 countries 1964 648.9 501.4 192.0 309.4 143.5 1965 723.6 562.1 187.5 374. 6 155. 1 1966 2 759.3 590.4 206.5 383.9 165. 1 OCEANIA, total of 2 countries 1964 336. 6 177. 1 53.6 123. 5 159.5 1965 309.3 130.9 35. 5 95.4 171.3 1966 183.9 90.3 42.8 47. 5 90. 6 LATIN AMERICA, total of 17 countries 1964 713. 2 535. 1 207.4 327. 7 173.3 1965 945. 1 784.3 292. 5 491.8 148.8 1966 2 . 895.8 715.9 302.5 413.4 171. 6 N0TE.-The above totals include the values for all countries in the free world, for which figures are avail- able, that are known to have exported to or imported from Communist areas in Eastern Europe and Asia $1 million or more in any year since 1960. Figures for listed countries in table 3C do not necessarily add to regional totals in the above table because of rounding. See note, table 4, for definition of COCOM countries. 1 Includes exports to Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam. 2 Preliminary and incomplete. 61 PAGENO="0248" 680 TABLE 3B.-FREE-WORLD IMPORTS FROM COMMUNIST AREAS, BY REGIONS, 1964-66 (Millions of dollars) tingregiOn~ and year Total Eastern Europe and Corn- munist AsIa 1 Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Corn- munist China Imports, total 1964 2 7,136.6 5,824.0 3,212.0 2,612.0 1 259.2 1965 2 8,097.6 6,538.8 3,590.2 2,948. 7 1 503.5 1966 2 9,047.1 7,166.3 3,990.9 3,175.4 1,811.3 COCOM countries, total 1964 3,263.4 2,830. 6 1,677.0 1, 153.6 390.2 1965 3,883.5 3,309. 0 1,930.9 1,378. 1 531.8 1966 4,516.0 3,783. 1 2,218.5 1,564.6 686. 0 EUROPEAN COCOM countries, total * 1964 2,682.6 2,450.3 1,546.8 903.5 223.3 1965 3,162.8 2,856.9 1,770.9 1,036.0 293.3 1966 3,576.9 3,205.6 2,001.7 1,203.9 360.6 OTHER EUROPE, total of 8 countries 1964 1,220.9 1,186.3 692.2 494.1 34.3 1965 1,306.9 1,263.6 750.8 512.8 41.8 1966 1,484.3 1,427. 1 841.8 585.3 55.9 NEAR EAST, total of 14 countries 1964 469. 1 407.2 256. 1 151.1 60.8 1965 574.9 487.7 316.9 170.8 86.6 1966 2 72L 3 531.7 377.0 204.7 137.5 AFRICA, total of 24 countries 1964 196.0 153.3 109.1 49.2 37.7 1965 257. 1 185.7 127.3 58.4 71.3 1966 2 243.9 160.3 102. 1 58.2 83.6 FAR EAST, except Japan, total of 13 countries 1964 2 1,151.9 541. 1 222.4 318.7 601.8 1965 2 1,230.2 611.4 260.7 350.7 608.8 1966 2 1,200.1 457.0 232.7 224.3 730.7 OCEANIA, total of 2 countries 1964 43.7 18.4 16. 1 2.3 24.9 1965 60.0 30.0 27.2 2.8 29.7 1966 51.3 20.6 18.7 1.9 30.5 LATIN AMERICA, total of 17 countries 1964 791.6 682. 1 239. 1 443. 0 109.5 1965 785.0 651. 5 176.4 475. 1 133.5 1966 2 830.3 736. 5 200. 1 536.4 87.1 .___._. __.-- _._ --- -- _____._ Norx.-The above totals include the values for all countries in the free world, for which figures are avail- able, that are known to have exported to or imported from Communist areas in Eastern Europe and Asia $1 million or more in any year since 1960. Figures for listed countries in table 3D do not necessarily add to regional totals in the above table because of rounding. See note, table 4, for definition of COCOM countries. I Includes imports from Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nnm. 2 Preliminary and incomplete. 62 PAGENO="0249" 681 TABLE 3C.-EXPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66 (Millions of dollars) and year Woild Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent of world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Corn- munist China NON-EUROPEAN COCOM COUNTRIES United States 1964 1965 1966 Canada 1964 1965 1966 Japan 1964 1965 1966 EUROPEAN COCOM COUNTRIES Belgium-Luxembourg 1964 1965 1966 Denmark 1964 1965 1966 France 1964 1965 1966 Germany, Federal Republic of 1964 1965 1966 Greece 1964 1965 1966 1964 1965 1966 Netherlands 1964 1965 1966 Norway 1964 1965 1966 Portugal 1964 1965 1966 Turkey 1964 1965 1966 United Kingdom 1964 1965 1966 OIlIER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES Austria 1964 1965 1966 Finland 1964 1965 1966 26, 488. 8 27, 478. 2 30,319.6 7, 699. 4 8,127.3 9,551.4 6, 673. 7 8, 452. 4 9, 777. 2 5, 589.8 6,381.7 6, 829. 0 2,083.0 2, 273. 6 2, 402. 2 8, 992. 7 10,050.7 10,888.9 16,502.7 18,193.9 20, 540. 5 308. 5 327. 7 405. 9 5,956. 3 7,188.0 8,031.9 5,807.2 6,392. 4 6,749. 4 1,290.7 1,442.6 1,561.8 515.8 576. 4 626.8 410.8 458.9 490. 5 12,782.2 13,710.3 14,660.9 1,446.1 1,599.9 1,683.5 1,291.3 1,426.8 1,505. 3 193.5 94.8 156. 1 149.5 99.7 68.9 36. 1 43. 7 59. 2 62. 5 70. 7 93. 4 49. 5 64.9 74. 7 170.8 229. 0 311.0 645. 4 742. 7 966.8 40. 5 48. 0 88.5 184.9 231. 3 267. 5 59. 0 75. 1 91. 2 41.5 44. 7 34. 0 6.8 6. 2 6. 7 28. 7 48. 0 56. 0 180. 1 194.3 279. 7 339.9 140.0 197.8 ~69. 0 380. 6 536. 5 2 385. 9 2 477~ 7 2 599~ 2 2 84. 6 2 112. 3 2140.7 2 86. 1 2 97~9 100.5 2 287. 1 2 367. 6 2 488. 1 2 866. 5 2 970. 1 21,232.9 64. 7 74.9 2 98. 3 2 296. 1 2 386. 6 2 420. 2 2 84. 7 2128.0 2134.2 64. 4 68. 4 53. 8 7.0 6.2 6. 7 37. 7 69. 0 74. 5 2 341. 5 2 395~ 5 2 514. 6 2 215. 6 2 247. 1 2 264. 6 226. 8 301. 1 284. 5 146.4 45. 2 41.7 293. 2 183. 4 296. 6 181.8 168.4 214.0 14.7 22.8 26. 4 35. 4 30. 8 23. 3 64. 1 72.0 75.8 193. 6 146.5 135.3 24. 2 26.9 28.3 90. 7 98. 1 89. 3 14.9 29.3 25. 2 17.0 18.5 14.5 (1) (1) (*) 9.0 18.7 18.5 111.3 128.6 141.1 1.3 .5 7.4 4.7 5.6 5. 8 5. 7 6. 1 1.5 1.8 2. 1 4.1 4.3 4.2 3.2 5.7 4.5 5.3 5.3 6.0 21.0 22. 8 24.2 5.0 5.4 5. 2 1.5 2.0 2.0 5.0 4.7 3.4 1.4 I. I 1. 1 9.2 15.0 15.~ 2. 7 2.9 3.5 14.9 15.4 15.7 17.6 21.1 18.9 339.9 140.0 197.8 442. 7 283. 1 365. 5 217.9 212. 1 273. 2 77. 2 93. 5 119.8 84.9 95. 7 98. 0 234. 9 301.0 386. 8 839.0 889. 2 1, 102. 1 64. 7 74. 9 92. 8 275. 6 329. 4 356. 8 73.9 104.4 116.4 58. 5 63. 2 48. 5 (1.8 6.2 37. 7 66. 7 74. 5 291. 4 322. 9 420. 8 214.7 244. 5 259. 8 220. 2 293.0 274. 3 (I) (I) (1) 126.3 97. 5 171.0 152.8 245. 1 315. 2 7.3 17.0 20. 3 1. 1 2. 1 2.5 40. 6 60.1 92. 1 25. 4 79.0 129. 4 (I) (1) (I) 18.5 56.4 62. 7 5.9 19.0 16. 1 9 5.3 (1) (1) (3) 2.3 (*) 49.9 72.3 93. 6 4:7 6. 6 8. 1 10.2 See footnotes at end of table. 157.0 57.7 187. 4 57. 1 200.3 59.5 64.5 155.7 66. 4 226. 6 60.8 213.5 63 PAGENO="0250" 682 TABLE 3C.-EXPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Expoits to tii~gcoun~~ld and year Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent of world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. USSR. Corn- munist China 15.9 14.9 16.7 14.3 11.5 11.9 15.9 14.9 16.7 2.8 4.4 1.5 .5 .7 .2 2.8 4.4 1.5 17.5 24.6 57.2 1.8 2.5 4.6 17.5 24.6 57.2 182.4 168.5 188.7 5.0 4.2 4.4 168.4 154.8 164.0 2753 21026 2134.6 2.8 3.5 4.1 64.6 84.1 113.0 23085 2464)3 24486 34.5 42.2 36.8 308.3 459.8 447.9 OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES- continued Iceland j964 111.1 1965 129.3 1966 140.7 Ireland 1964 622.2 1965 627.0 1966 681.6 Spain 1964 954.6 1965 966.7 1966 1,253.8 Sweden 1964 3,673.8 1965 3,973.0 1966 4,272. 5 Switzerland 1964 2,649.0 1965 2,960.3 1966 3,275.3 Yugoslavia 1964 893. 1 1965 1:091.4 1966 1,220.1 NEAR EASTERN COUNTRIES Cyprus 1964 57.8 1965 68.9 1966 77. 5 Ethiopia 1964 104.9 1965~ 124.0 1966 111.0 Iran 1964 1,254.0 1965 1,303.0 1966 1,309.3 Iraq 1964 839.7 1965 885.3 1966 934.9 Israel 1964 369. 7 1965 429.1 1966 502.2 Jordan 1964 24.4 1965 27.8 1966 36. 1 Kuwait 1964 1,218.0 1965 1,243.0 1966 1,304. 0 Lebanon 1964 89.7 1965 118.9 1966 102.7 Libya 1964 708.7 1965 796.5 1966 995. 1 Malta 1964 19.4 1965 24.3 1966 30. 1 See footnotes at end of table. 5.8 8. 1 6.8 2.7 2.3 1.5 14.2 22.6 51.2 81.7 104. 5 124. 7 54. 6 68.8 91.0 192. 0 272.2 254.2 2.2 4.4 4.1 .6 1.5 .8 18. 7 21.0 22.0 1.4 1.6 2.7 14.4 16.4 20. 5 1. 1 1.1 10.1 6.8 9.9 2.1 (*) 3.3 2.0 6.0 86. 7 50.3 39.3 10.0 15.3 22.0 116.3 187.6 193. 7 .5 3.0 4. 7 .6 1.0 2.2 21.2 17.3 16.7 2. 1 4. 1 2.2 .5 .6 1.9 (*) (*) (*) (3) (1) (1) 3.8 1.8 2.7 .7 .3 (1) (*) (*) (1) (1) (1) (I) (I) (1) 14.0 13.7 24.7 10.6 18.2 21. 1 .2 C') C') (3) C') 1 .5 C') C') .1 4.9 5.0 6.6 (1) .2 C') (*) C') .3 (3) (I) (1) .5 (1) (*) C') C') (*) C') 2.7 7.4 8.8 1.2 2.5 3.0 39.9 38.3 38. 7 3. 5 5.7 4.9 14.9 17. 0 22.4 1. 1 1. 1 .7 4.7 10.7 11.4 1. 1 2.1 3. 1 3.2 2.9 3.0 1.0 1.2 1.2 4.0 4.0 4.5 4.4 3.8 2.9 (6) (5) 7.0 5.3 7.0 2.7 7.4 8.8 1.2 2.6 3.5 39.9 38.3. 38.8 8.4 10. 7 11.5 14.9 17.2 22.4 1. 1 1. 1 1.0 (3) (1) 6.3 6.3 7.2 .~ .2 (I) (I) (3) (3) (1) (1) (1) (1) 6.3 2.5 5.8 4.0 7.2 4.5 .7 (1) (3) .4 .1 (3) .2 (1) .1 (1) (1) C') (3) (1) (1) (1) .5 (1) (1) (3) 64 PAGENO="0251" 683 TABLE 3C.-EXPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) and year - Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent of world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Corn- munist China NEAR EASTERN COUNTRIES- continued South Arabia, Federation of (Aden) 1964 208.0 (1) (3) (1) (1) (*) (1) 1965 186. 9 . 1 . 1 (1) (~) (I) . 1 1966 190. 2 . 1 (2) . 1 (1) . 1 (1) Sudan 1964 197. 1 24. 3 12.3 19. 4 14. 3 5. 1 4.9 1965 195. 2 40.3 20.6 24. 9 12. 3 12. 6 15.4 January-September 1966. 150. 7 25.8 17. 1 17. 4 10.9 6.5 8.4 Syria - 1964 176. 1 2 71.2 40.4 42. 5 26. 1 16.4 28.3 1965 168. 5 57. 1 33.9 40.4 23. 2 17.2 16.7 1966 169.0 59.3 35.1 39.9 21.5 18.4 19.4 United Arab Republic (Egypt) 1964 539. 1 2 233. 2 43.3 215.6 119.2 96.4 16.7 1965 605.2 2 311.4 51.5 265. 5 135. 1 130.4 45. 1 1966 605.2 2 315.8 52.2 282. 1 139. 5 142.6 32.5 AFRICAN COUNTRIES Angola 1964 204. 1 . 6 .3 .4 . 4 (3) .2 1965 199.9 1.4 .7 1.4 1.4 (3) (1) 1966 221.2 1.8 .8 1.8 1.8 (3) (*) Cameroon 19646 121.7 .6 .5 .6 .6 (*) (*) 19656 118.8 .3 .2 .3 .3 (~) (~) January-June 1966 . . . 89.0 .8 .9 .8 . 5 .3 (3) Chad 1964 26.5 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1965 27.2 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1966 23. 7 . 1 .4 . 1 . 1 (3) (3) Congo (Kinshasa) 1964 349.7 . 2 . I . 2 . 2 (3) (1) 1965 336,9 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) January-September 1966. 325. 4 (1) (3) (1) (I) (*) (*) Dahomey 1964 13.2 .1 .4 .1 .1 (*) (*) 1965 13.6 (1) .1 (1) (1) (*) (*) 1966 10.5 (12) .2 (*) () (*) (*) Ghana 1964 293. 2 31. 0 10.6 28.2 10. 4 17.8 2.8 1965 292. 1 57. 6 19. 7 51.9 20.4 31.5 5. 7 1966 245. 3 48. 9 20.0 43. 7 18.3 25.4 5.2 Ivory Coast 1964 301.8 5. 1 1. 7 5. 1 2.5 2. 6 (3) 1965 . 277.2 5.9 2. 1 5.9 3.2 2. 7 (*) 1966 310. 5 3. 1 1.0 3. 1 2. 6 . 5 (`) Kenya 1964 149.9 4.3 2.9 3.2 3.2 (1) 1.1 1965 145.7 4. 5 3. 1 2. 7 2.0 . 7 1.8 1966 174.5 6.9 4.0 4.3 3.3 1.0 2.6 Malagasy Republic 1964 91.8 .9 1.0 .9 .9 (3) (3) 1965 91.7 .9 1.0 .9 .9 (3) (1) 1966 97. 8 . 5 . 5 . 5 . 5 (3) (3) 1964 16. 6 6. 2 37. 1 4. 2 1. 2 3. 0 2.0 1965 15. 7 . 6 3.9 . 6 (I) . 6 (1) 1966 13.1 (I) (3) (1) (3) (I) (I) Morocco 1964 431.9 41. 4 9.6 29. 1 23. 7 5.4 12.3 1965 430. 0 41.0 9.5 31.8 20. 7 11. 1 9.2 1966 428. 4 48. 7 11. 4 40.9 29.8 11. 1 7.8 Mozamb~iquc 1964 105.8 .4 .4 .3 .2 .1 .1 1965 108. 1 . 1 . I . 1 . 1 (1) (*) January-October 1966 . . 88.8 . 1 . I . 1 - 1 (*) * (*) See footnotes at end of table. 65 PAGENO="0252" 684 TABLE 3C.-EXPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Exporting country and year World Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent 01 world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Com- muhist China 2.2 2.9 1.2 .3 .3 .3 .3 (3) (3) .2 .8 1.2 5.1 7.7 6.6 1.5 2.2 (3) 7.1 7.1 10.9 6.0 12.0 6.6 2.4 2.3 2.1 (3) (1) (3) 11.6 20.0 9.1 .4 (1) (3) (1) 2.7 1.4 2.0 2.6 5.3 3.6 1.8 6. 1 .4 (1) 9.0 6.0 14.4 2.0 4.1 9.0 8.4 12.1 13.9 AFRICAN COUNTRIES- continued Niger 1964 1965 1966 Nigeria 1964 1965 1966 Senegal 1964 1965 1966 Sierra Leone 1964 1965 1966 Somali Republic 1964 South Africa, Republic of 1964 1965 1966 Southern Rhodesia 1964 1965 Tanzania 1964 1965 1966 Togo 1964 1965 1966 Tunisia 1964 1965 1966 Uganda 1964 1965 1966 Zambia 1964 1965 1966 FAR EASTERN COUNTRIES Afghanistan S 1964 1965 Burma 1964 1965 January-October 1966 Cambodia 1964 1965 January-November 1966. Ceylon 1964 1965 1966 Hong Kong 10 1964 1965 1966 See footnotes at end of table. 18.9 25.3 34.7 661.0 751.2 792. 1 122.5 128.5 148.9 85.2 82.2 82.9 36. 1 1,453.5 1,469.9 1,664.6 373.7 442.1 200.0 179.4 236.9 30.2 26.8 35.9 129.7 119.9 140.4 186.0 179.1 187.9 469.7 532.4 690.8 70.7 70.0 236.6 225. 1 171.0 87.5 105.4 61.1 393.9 409.2 357.0 774.8 879.7 1,002.7 (3) (1) (3) 13.2 22.0 9. 1 .4 .4 .5 .3 (1) (3) (1) 2.7 1.4 2.0 2.6 5.3 10. 1 13.9 15.6 .4 .6 (1) 9.3 8.5 15.2 11.1 21.6 12.4 11.4 12. 1 14.5 2 26.8 2 19.3 41.7 35. 1 1 19. 1 2 13.3 2 14.7 2 11.9 2 57.6 271.4 69.3 22.5 2 3~5 22.9 (3) (1) (3) 7. 1 13.7 8.4 (1) (1) .3 (1) (3) (1) 2.7 1.4 2.0 1.9 5.3 2.7 1.0 4.5 (1) (1) (s) 7.8 4.8 9.5 2.0 4. 1 8.8 7.7 5.4 8.2 ~ 3.0 ~ 7.2 8. 1 2.9 937 5. 1 4.8 4.9 10.7 14.8 14.9 (1) (3) (1) (3) 4.5 6.3 .7 .3 .4 .5 (3) (3) (3) (1) (3) (3) (3) .7 (1) .9 .8 1.6 .4 .6 (1) 1.2 1.2 4.9 (1) (1) .2 .7 6.7 5.7 22.5 17.5 16.8 13.5 p1.1 .8 1.2 .5 21.2 20.4 17.2 (1) (1) (1) (3) (3) (3) 1.6 2.0 (1) (3) (*) (*) (3) (3) (3) (1) (3) (3) (3) (*) (1) 6.5 12.1 9.5 (*) (.) (*) .3 2.5 .8 9. 1 17.5 3.4 3.0 (.) (3) (3) 16.8 18.7 9 14.3 6.2 6.5 5.5 25.6 36. 1 37.2 2.3 3.1 2.7 37.9 625.5 27.5 ~l8.7 17.6 24.9 15.6 16.4 11.2 p4.8 15.2 5.9 14.0 6.0 19.4 5.4 14.6 31.9 17.4 35.2 19.4 32.1 .3 .1 .4 .1 .3 (1) 66 PAGENO="0253" 685 TABLE 3C.-EXPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) tingcount~orts0 and year World Tota Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent of world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Corn- munist China . FAR EASTERN COUNTRIES- continued India 1964 .. 1,741.0 270.4 15.5 270. 4 112.6 157.8 (1) 1965 1,691.2 293.4 17.4 293.4 110.4 183.0 (1) 1966 1,605.8 295. 1 18.4 295. 1 112.7 182.4 (1) Indonesia 1964 724. 1 ii 87.2 11.5 11 34 5 Ii 8.7 12 25.8 ii 52.7 1965 706. 5 2 76. 5 10.8 36. 0 9.7 26.3 40.0 January-November 1966. 646.0 2 46.3 7.2 36.3 12.4 23.9 9.3 Malaysia and Singapore Malaya and Singapore 1964 1,252.7 2 93.8 7.5 92.2 30.9 61.3 .3 1965 1,399.0 2 144.4 10.3 134.3 27.8 106. 5 7.3 Malaysia 13 1966 1,019. 1 135.3 18.3 114. 1 18.3 95.8 21.2 Sarawak 1964 130.9 (1) (5) (1) (1) (*) (1) 1965 204.5 (1) (2) (1) (1) (3) (1) January-June 1966 . . . 73. 1 (1) (2) (*) (*) (*) (1) Singapore 1966 1, 101.2 2 96. 1 8.7 49. 5 13.4 36. 1 44.8 Pakistan 1964 520.7 53.0 10.2 13.3 10. 1 3.2 39.7 1965 530.0 60.9 11.5 17.6 12.0 5.6 43.3 1966 600.8 77.4 12.9 47.2 20.4 26.8 30.2 Taiwan 1964 433.0 (1) (3) (1) (1) (3) (3) 1965 449. 7 (1) (5) (1) (1) (3) (3) 1966 536.3 (1) ~5) (1) (1) (*) (*) Thailand 1964 591. 1 2. 5 .4 2.5 2.5 (*) () 1965 624. 1 4.4 .7 4.4 3.9 .5 (3) 1966 694.4 5.8 .8 5.8 5.8 (1) (*) COUNTRIES IN OCEANIA Australia 1964 3,036.0 318. 1 10.5 165. 1 44.7 120.4 153.0 1965 2,971. 1 2 292.5 9.8 121.0 30.3 90.7 164.5 1966 3,080.8 2 155. 5 5.0 69.0 36.0 33.0 83. 5 New Zealand 1964 1,074. 1 18. 5 1.7 12. 1 8.9 3.2 6.4 1965 1,006.6 16.8 1.7 10.0 5.2 4.8 6.8 1966 1,061.4 28.4 2. 7 21.3 6.8 14.5 7. 1 LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES Argetina 1964 1,410.4 2 152.8 10.8 60.5 45.9 14.6 91. 7 1965 1,492.8 196.3 18. 1. 112.6 30.7 81.9 83.7 1966 1,593.2 2 227.9 14.8 142.7 55. 1 87.6 84.0 Bolivia 1964 113.8 (*) (*) ~ (*) (*) 1965 131.8 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1966 150.4 (8) (3) (3) (3) (3) Brazil 1964 1,429.8 88.6 6.2 88.4 51.3 37. 1 . 2 1965 1,595. 5 89. 7 5.6 89.3 60.0 29.3 .4 1966 1,741.4 105.3 6.0 104.2 72.6 31.6 1.1 Chile 1964 625.7 2.0 .3 2.0 2.0 (3) (*) 1965 687.9 7.4 1.1 1.0 .9 .1 6.4 1966 880.8 5.3 .6 4.1 3.9 .2 1.2 Colombia 1964 . 548. 1 8.0 1.5 8. 0 8.0 (3) (3) 1965 539.1 212.1 2.2 11.5 10.8 .7 (*) 1966 507. 6 18. 0 3.5 18. 0 16. 1 1. 9 () Cuba 1964 709. 4 2 415. 8 58. 6 330.4 55. 5 274.9 81. 4 1965 686. 0 2 546. 5 79. 7 480.0 105.0 375.0 55.0 1966 14 640.0 2 492.0 76.9 401.0 116.0 285.0 85.0 See footnotes at end of table. 67 PAGENO="0254" 686 TABLE 3C.-ExPoRTs OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES TO THE WORLD AND TO COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66--Continued (Millions of dollars) tingcount~ and year World Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia ~ Value Percent of world Eastern Europe Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Corn- munlst China LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES- continued Ecuador 1964 130.4 (1) (5) (1) (1) (*) (8) 1965 133.8 (1) (5) (1) (1) (*) (*) 1966 147.5 21.1 7 (15) (15) (15) (15) Guyana 1964 94.8 (1) (3) (1) . (1) (8) (*) 1965 97.3 .2 .2 .2 .2 (*) (*) 1966 108. 7 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) Haiti 16 1964 38.0 (1) (3) (1) (1) (*) (*) 1965 38. 2 . 1 . 2 . 1 . 1 (*) (*) Honduras 1964 94.7 (3) (3) (3) (8) (*) 1965 126.6 (3) (3) (3) (~) (*) 1966 145.0 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) Jamaica 1964 218. 1 2.8 1.3 2. 8 2.0 . 8 (*) 1965 214. 7 1.3 .6 1.3 .9 . 4 (1) 1966 224.9 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) Mexico 1964 934.9 217.6 1.9 17.5 17.4 .1 (`) 1965 1,030. 2 61. 2 5. 9 58. 7 58.6 . 1 2. 5 1966 1,072.2 8.5 .8 8.5 8.0 .5 (1) Peru 1964 667. 2 2 12. 7 1.9 12.6 12. 6 (1) (1) 1965 667. 6 16.9 2.5 16.9 16.9 (1) (1) 1966 764. 7 21. 2 2. 8 21.2 21. 2 (4) (1) Surinam 1964 47.8 (1) (3) (3) (3) (3) (1) 1965 58.7 (1) (5) (3) (3) (3) (1) Trinidad and Tobago 1964 405.1 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) 1965 401.8 (1) (3) (1) (1) (3) (1) 1966 426.1 (3) (3) (3) (3) (3) Uruguay 1964 178.9 13.0 7.3 13.0 12.8 . 2 (1) 1965 191. 2 10. 1 5.3 9.9 5. 5 4.4 . 2 1966 185.8 16. 3 8.8 16.0 9. 5 6. 5 .3 Venezuela 1964 2, 703. 0 . 1 (3) . 1 . 1 (3) (3) 1965 2,743.2 2.9 .1 2.9 2.9 (4) (4) 1966 2, 712. 8 . 1 (3) . 1 . 1 (`) (4) NOTE. Data for 1964-66 are shown wherever they are available. In this table exports include reexports for Australia, Burma, Canada, Ceylon, Colombia, Cyprus, Denmark, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Finland, Ghana, Honduras, India, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Libya, Malaysia and Singapore, Malta, Mexico, New Zea- land, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Southern Rhodesia, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, Republic of South Africa, Federation of South Arabia (Aden), Sudan, Sweden, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela, and Zambia. I Less than $0.05 million. 2 Includes exports to Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam. 3 Not reported in the source. 4 Figures are based on export licenses issued. Less than 0.05 percent. 6 East Cameroon only. `Excludes Zanzibar. 8 Year ending March of stated year. `May be incomplete. 10 Figures are for domestic exports only. Hong Kong reexports to Eastens Europe and Communist Asia were valued at $10.2 million in 1964, $9.9 million in 1965, and $9.9 million in 1966. ii Data are partly estimated. 12 Data are imports from Indonesia derived from U.S.S.R. sources. 13 States of Malaya only. I~ Data are estimates. IS Not available. 18 Year ending September of stated year. * None. 68 PAGENO="0255" 687 TABLE 3D-IMPORTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66 (Millions of dollars) Imports from Total Eastern Europe and Eastern Communist Asia Eastern Europe, Com- World Europe excluding U.S.S.R. munist U.S.S.R. China Value Percent Importing country of world NON-EUROPEAN COCOM COUNTRIES United States 1964 18, 684.0 1 102.3 . 5 98.5 77.8 20. 7 . 5 1965 21,365. 6 1 141. 6 .7 137.4 94.8 42. 6 . 5 1966 25,550.3 1 182. 2 .7 178. 7 129. 1 49.6 . 1 Canada 1964 6,944.4 34. 1 .5 25. 4 22.8 2. 6 8. 7 1965 8,005.8 51.9 .6 38. 5 29.3 9.2 13.4 1966 9, 126.8 68.9 . 8 49.9 39. 1 10.8 19. 0 Japan 1964 7,938.2 1 444~ 4 5.6 256.4 29. 7 226.7 157.8 1965 5,169.7 1 527. 1 6.5 276.0 35.8 240.2 224.7 1966 9, 523. 5 1 688. 0 7.2 349. 0 48. 6 300. 4 306.3 EUROPEAN COCOM COUNTRIES Belgium-Luxembourg 1964 5,922. 5 1 132. 5 2.2 117.3 67.6 49. 7 13.7 196.5 6,373.6 1 137. 3 2.2 120.6 74.3 46.3 14.2 1966 7,174. 0 1 154.8 2.2 136.3 75.7 60. 6 15.4 Denmark 1964 2,668.8 112. 5 4.3 101.6 74.6 27. 0 10.9 1965 2,811. 6 I 124. 5 4. 4 113.7 79.2 34. 5 10.5 1966 2,990. 4 1 137. 4 4. 6 125. 6 85.7 39.9 fl. 7 France 1964 10,069.7 1 294. 1 2.9 259. 1 118.0 141. 1 30.8 1965 10,338.4 1 319. 5 3. 1 272.4 126.4 146.0 43.7 1966 11,842.5 1 4.05.9 3. 4 348. 5 176.7 171.8 53.9 Germany, Federal Republic of 1964 14,613.4 1 796. 1 5. 4 743. 5 573.1 170.4 51. 7 1965 17,772.3 1 979~ 7 5.5 904.3 693.8 210. 5 72. 7 1966 18,358.9 11, 080. 8 5.9 986.7 741.4 245.3 92.5 Greece 1964 885.0 73.4 8.3 73.3 45.9 27.4 - 1965 1,133.6 1 102. 6 9.0 102.4 65.9 36. 5 . 1 1966 1,222.7 101.2 8.5 100.7 62. 6 38. 1 . 5 Italy 1964 7,231.3 1 394~4 5.5 370. 2 223.2 147.0 23.8 1965 7,347.3 1 477 5 6.5 438. 3 257.0 181. 3 38.4 1966 8, 571.3 1 570. 5 6.7 513. 7 323.8 189.9 56. 5 Netherlands 1964 7,053.9 1 146. 5 2. 1 125.2 89.5 35.7 20.0 1965 7,463. 0 1 177. 6 2.4 150.8 97.9 52.9 25.4 1966 8,016. 2 1 182. 0 2.3 150. 5 102. 1 48. 4 30. 2 Norway 1964 1,983.7 70. 2 3. 5 67. 0 41.3 25. 7 3. 2 1965 2, 205. 7 73. 1 3.3 68.3 40.1 28. 2 4.8 1966 2,402. 6 76. 2 3.2 71.3 39.8 31. 5 4.9 Portugal 1964 776. 3 9.9 1.3 9. 7 9. 7 (2) . 2 19115 923.5 12.2 1.3 12.0 11.9 .1 .2 1966 1, 012. 0 13. 2 1.3 13. 0 12.5 - 5 . 2 Turkey 1964 542.0 42. 0 7.8 42. 0 34.0 8. 0 (3) 1965 576. 7 57. 6 10. 0 57. 6 40. 9 16. 7 (3) 1966 724. 6 84. 4 11.6 84.3 58. 2 26. 1 - United Kingdom 1964 15,949. 0 1 610. 9 3. 8 541.3 269.8 271. 5 68.9 196.5 16, 137.8 1 701. 2 4.3 616.7 283. 7 333. 0 83. 2 1966 16, 671. 1 1 770. 6 4.6 675. 1 323.3 351.8 94. 7 OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES Austria 1964 1,862. 7 1 201. 4 10. 8 198. 1 146. 0 52. 1 3. 2 1965 2,100. 4 1 231. 6 11.0 226.3 173.6 52.7 4.9 1966 2,327. 6 1 232. 3 10.0 223.0 174. 1 48.9 9. 2 See footnotes at end of table. 09 PAGENO="0256" 688 TABLE 3D.-IMP0RT5 OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Impor tingcoui~try~om ---~---- World Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Value Percent of world Europe Eastern Eastern excluding Europe, U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. munist Corn- China OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES- continued Finland 1964 1,505.0 321.2 21.3 314.4 67.0 247.4 6.8 1965 1,645.7 305. 5 18.6 299.6 68.4 231.2 5.9 1966 1,726.4 337.8 19.6 329.3 66.7 262.6 8. 5 Iceland 1964 131. 1 21.3 16.2 21.3 10.3 11.0 (2) 1965 137.3 22.0 16.0 21.9 9.8 12.1 .1 1966 159.4 18.1 11.8 18.0 7.0 11.0 .1 Ireland 1964 973.9 13.6 1.8 12.6 10.3 2.3 1.0 1965 1,040.6 17.8 1.7 16.6 13.5 3.1 1.2 1966 1,043.3 18. 4 1.8 16. 4 12. 4 4.0 2.~0 Spain 1964 2,259.3 29.8 1.8 29.6 26.0 3.6 .2 196.5 3,003.9 70.4 2.8 68. 7 47.6 21.1 1.7 1966 3,591.4 50. 5 1.4 46.9 39.9 7.0 3. 6 Sweden 1964 3,855.0 171.7 4.5 159.5 90.1 69.4 12.2 1965 4,378.4 1 195.6 4.5 180. 1 107. 7 72.4 15. 1 1966 4,573.8 216.9 4.7 201. 5 115.9 85. 6 14. 4 Switzerland 1964 3,610.3 l 83.2 2.8 72.3 64. 1 8.2 10.8 1965 3,697.4 1 94.2 2.5 81.0 68.8 12.2 12.7 1966 3,944. 1 1 112. 7 2.9 96. 3 75. 6 20. 7 16. 1 Yugoslavia 1964 1,323.0 1 378.7 28.6 378.5 273.4 100.1 . 1 1965 1,237.8 1 369.8 28.7 369.3 261.4 107.9 .2 1966 1,576. 4 1 498.5 81.6 495.8 350. 1 145. 7 1.9 NEAR EASTERN COUNTRIES Cyprus 1964 105.1 6.6 5.8 5.6 4.0 1.6 (1) 196.5 143.8 9.7 6.7 9.7 5.3 4.4 (~) 1966 154.4 9.3 6.0 9.3 5.0 4.3 (3) Ethiopia 1964 122.9 7.2 5.9 5.4 4.2 1.2 1.8 1965~ 126.8 8.7 6.9 6.0 4.7 1.3 2.7 1966 161.7 10.3 6.8 7.7 5.1 2.6 2.6 Iran 1964 672. 7 63.7 8.0 53. 7 21.6 32.1 () 1965 860.0 37.7 4.4 37.7 25.0 12.7 (`) 1966 929.6 1 66.6 7.2 55.2 28.8 26.4 11.2 Iraq - 1964 412.6 67.8 16.4 53.2 32.0 21.2 14.6 1965 450.6 110.6 24.5 93.6 60.6 33.0 16.9 1966 492.2 1 89.2 18.1 67.9 42.2 25. 7 21.2 Israel 1964 826.0 16.4 2.0 16.4 16.3 .1 (2) 1965 835.4 16.6 2.0 16.6 16.2 .4 (2) 1966 839.2 17.9 2.1 17.9 16.9 1.0 (2) Jordan 1964 150.0 15. 7 10.5 13. 5 11. 5 2.0 2.2 1965 156.9' 18.0 11.5 14.3 11.2 3.1 3.7 1966 186. 7 20. 1 10.8 14. 6 10. 5 4.0 5. 6 Kuwait 1964 322.5 9.6 3.0 3. 7 3. 7 (3) 5.9 1965 377.2 28.5 7.6 16.3 10.5 5.8 12.2 1966 462.8 37.4 8.1 22.2 13.8 8.4 15.2 Lebanon 1964 428.2 37.5 8.7 33.9 28.2 6.7 3.6 1965 485.1 42.8 8.8 37.9 31.9 6.0 4.9 1966 632.8 50.1 9.4 42.4 36.8 5.6 7. 7 See footnotes at end of table. 70 PAGENO="0257" 689 TABLE 3D-IMPoRTS OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Impoits from ~tingcouii~ and year ::: Total Eastern Europe and ~__~____ Communist Asia Value Percent of world Europe Eastern Eastern excluding Eurone, U.S.S.R. U.S.S. R. munist Corn- China `NEAR EASTERN COUNTRIES- continued Libya 1964 292.3 14.3 4.9 12.8 8.8 4.0 1.5 1965 320. 4 21.3 6.6 16. 5 13.3 3.2 4.8 1966 405.0 30. 7 7.6 22.8 19.2 3. 6 7.9 Malta 1964 96.5 4. 2 4.3 3.9 3.8 . i~ss 99.0 4.7 4.8 4.2 3.8 .4 .5 1966 108. 4 5. 4 5.0 4. 7 4. 5 . 2 . 7 South Arabia, Federation of (Aden) 1964 297. 1 10. 1 3.7 9.0 8.2 .8 1. 1 1965 301.2 9.2 3.0 7.3 5.0 2.3 1.9 1966 285. 4 7. 6 2. 7 6.2 4.3 1.9 1.4 Sudan 1964 274.2 26.0 9. 5 19. 4 15.2 4.2 6 6 1965 207. 6 26. 3 12.6 19. 7 12. 3 7. 4 6.6 January-September 1966. 162. 3 24. 1 14.9 16.3 10.8 5. 5 7.8 Syria 1964 235. 2 32. 7 13.9 27. 3 23. 0 4.3 5 4 1965 212. 6 32. 2 15. 1 26. 4 19. 7 6. 7 5.8 1966 . 293. 0 82. 5 28. 2 66.8 45. 0 21.8 15.7 United Arab Republic (Egypt) 1964 953.2 1168. 2 17.7 149.3 75. 5 73.8 17.8 1965 933 5 1 208.8 22.4 181. 5 97.5 84.0 26. 7 1966 1,070.4 1 270. 0 25.2 227. 8 134. 1 93. 7 40.3 AFRICAN COUNTRIES Angola 1964 164. 0 . 5 .3 . 5 . 5 (3) (2) 1965 194.8 . 5 . 2 . 5 . 5 (3) (2) 1966 208.8 1. 2 .6 1. 2 1. 2 (3) (2) Caineroon 1964~ 115.8 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.4 (2) (2) 1965~ 134.9 1.6 1.2 1.6 1.5 .1 (3) January-June 1966. . . . 87. 7 1. 9 2. 2 1. 8 1.8 (2) . 1 Chad 1964 34. 6 . 8 2.4 . 3 . 3 (~) . 5 1965 31.2 .6 2.0 .2 .2 (2) .4 1966 32. 3 1. 2 3.7 . 6 . 6 (2) . 6 Congo (Kinshasa) 1964 288. 3 . 7 . 2 . 7 . 7 (2) (2) 1965 319. 9 (6) (6) (6) (6) (6) January-September 1966. 256. 8 1. 4 .6 1. 4 1. 4 (2) (3) 1)ahorney 1964 31.4 .5 1.5 .3 .3 (2) .2 1965 34.4 1.4 4.0 .9 .5 .4 .5 1966 33.5 1.8 5.2 1.2 .7 .5 .6 Ghana 1964 340.2 50. 4 14.8 47. 7 30.9 16.8 2. 7 1965 450. 1 104.8 23.3 90. 1 60. 1 30.0 14. 7 1966 362. 7 47. 6 iS. 1 40. 1 19. 7 20.4 7. 5 Ivory Coast 1964 238. 5 1. 5 . 6 1. 0 1. 0 (2) . 5 1965 236. 3 2. 1 . 9 2. 1 1. 5 . 6 (6) 1966 257.7 1.9 .7 1.7 1.6 .1 .2 Kenya 1964 214.5 6.7 3.1 4.8 4.7 .1 1.9 1965 249.3 6.1 2.5 3.4 2.2 1.2 2.7 1966 314. 7 12. 7 4.0 7. 3 4. 6 2. 7 5. 4 Malagasy Republic 1964 135.5 1.6 1.2 1.3 1.3 (3) .3 1965 138.1 3.1 2.4 1.5 1.5 (3) 1.6 1966 141.5 ~2.9 2.1 .7 7,7 (2) 2.2 See footnotes at end of table. 71 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 17 PAGENO="0258" 690 TABLE 3D.-IMP0RTs OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST ARE AS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Imports from I~ing country --~-~--- World Total Eastern Europe and ~_________ Communist Asia Value Percent of world Europe Eastern Eastern excluding Europe, U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. munist Corn- China AFRICAN COUNTRIES- continued Mali 1964 36.6 13. 7 37.3 10.9 1. 7 9.2 2.8 1965 42.9 19.2 44.7 9. 4 1. 4 8.0 9.8 1966 36.0 16. 5 45.8 6. 2 1. 6 4. 6 10. 3 Morocco 1964 459.9 40. 5 8.8 28. 7 18. 1 10. 6 11.8 1965 452.8 35. 7 7.9 23. 7 14. 2 9. 5 12. 0 1966 477.0 52.7 11.0 36.3 20.3 16.0 16.4 Mozambiquc 1964 156.2 . 3 . 2 . 3 . 3 (~) (2) 1965 173. 2 . 3 . 2 . 3 . 3 () (2) January-October 1966 . . 172. 5 . 2 . 1 . 2 . 2 (8) (2) Niger 1964 33.5 .7 2.0 .2 .2 (3) .5 1965 37.7 2.1 5.6 .3 .2 .1 1.8 1966 45.0 2. 6 5.9 . 1 . 1 (2) 2. 5 Nigeria 1964 710.9 27. 7 3.9 18.9 18.8 . 1 8.8 1965 770.4 31. 5 4. 1 17.9 17. 1 .8 13. 6 1966 717.8 30.2 4.2 16.1 14.7 1.4 14.1 Senegal 1964 171.6 3.6 2.1 .3 .2 .1 3.3 1965 164.3 3.4 2.1 .4 .3 .1 3.0 1966 161.0 5.1 3.1 1.0 .7 .3 4.1 Sierra Leone 1964 99.4 4.4 4.4 3. 6 3. 6 (2) .8 1965 107.5 6.0 5.6 4.7 4.6 .1 1.3 1966 100.0 7.6 7.6 6. 1 5. 7 . 4 1. 5 Somali Republic 1964 54.7 7.1 13.0 6.6 .5 6.1 .5 South Africa, Republic of 1964 2,220.0 9.7 .4 9. 7 8.2 1.5 (3) 1965 2, 455. 4 6. 7 .3 6. 7 6. 4 .3 (~) 1966 2,299.8 5.8 . 2 5.8 5.5 .3 (~) Southern Rhodesia 1964 307.1 1.1 .4 .6 .6 (2) .5 1965 335.4 1.0 .3 .9 - .9 (2) .1 Tanzania 8 1964 123.1 2.5 2.0 1.6 1.4 .2 .9 1965 140.1 7.3 5.2 2.4 2.0 .4 4.9 1966 179.9 14.4 8.0 4.0 3.5 .5 10.4 Togo 1964 41.7 1.7 4.1 1.1 .6 .5 .6 1965 45.0 1.8 4.1 1.2 .4 .8 .6 1966 47.3 2.8 5.9 1.5 .8 .7 1.3 Tunisia 1964 250.7 17.1 6.8 16.9 13.0 3.9 . 2 1965 245.9 16.4 6.7 14.8 9.1 5.7 1.6 1966 250.0 25.4 10.2 23. 7 14.0 9. 7 1. 7 Uganda 1964 91.9 1.8 1.9 1.1 1.1 (3) .7 1965 114. 4 4.9 4.3 2.2 2. 1 . 1 2. 7 1966 120.3 7.5 6.2 2.7 2.2 .5 4.8 Zambia 1964 219.0 .3 . 1 .3 .3 (2) (2) 1965 295.0 .4 .1 .4 .4 (2) (3) 1966 344. 6 .8 . 2 . 6 . 6 (2) FAR EASTERN COUNTRIES Afghanistan 9 1964 141. 4 1 71.2 50.4 70.3 5. 1 65.2 (3) 1965 131.0 1 66. 6 50.9 7 64.9 7 3.9 61.0 (3) Burma 1964 271.5 49.3 18.2 17. 5 9.6 7.9 31.8 1965 247.4 47.8 19.3 20.1 12.9 7.2 27.7 January-October 1966 . . 136.3 7 19.3 14.2 9.8 6.5 3.3 9.5 See footnotes at end of table. 72 PAGENO="0259" 691 TABLE 3D-IMPoRTs OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTRIES FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST AREAS, 1964-66-Continued (Millions of dollars) Imports horn tingcountiy and year Total Eastern Europe and -_________ Communist Asia Value Percent of world Europe Eastern Eastern excluding Europe, U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. munist Corn- China FAR EASTERN COUNTRIES- continued Cambodia 1964 81.8 119.8 24.2 8. 1 6. 1 2.0 10.4 1965 102.9 1 29.3 28.5 13.3 10.7 2.6 14.1 January-November 1966. 103.9 1 29.8 28.6 10.8 7.7 3.1 17.1 Ceylon 1964 414. 6 75.8 18.8 32.9 18.5 14.4 42.9 1965 309. 6 60~ 2 19.4 36.3 15.3 21.0 23.9 1966 425.9 1 88. 6 20.8 42.0 17. 6 24.4 45.6 Ilong Kong 1964 1,496.3 1 355.3 23. 7 5. 1 3. 6 1. 5 344.8 1965 1, 568.8 1 415.9 26. 5 5. 1 3. 5 1. 6 406.3 1966 1,767.0 1 497 4 28.2 5. 6 2. 7 2.9 484.6 India 1964 2, 714.6 280.9 10.8 280.8 116. 2 164. 6 . 1 1965 2,990. 1 1 309.5 10.4 309. 4 126.9 182.5 (2) 1966 2, 750. 1 1 281. 4 10. 2 281.2 130.5 150. 7 (2) Indonesia 1964 622.0 10 133.9 10 89.3 1042.6 1046. 7 11 44.6 1965 718.0 10 113. 2 . * `~ 113.2 10 58.8 10 54 4 (3) 1966 583.0 10 39~7 ~ 39 7 ~ 34.8 10 4.8 (3) Malaysia and Singapore Malaya and Singapore 1964 1,399. 1 1 110.0 7.9 9. 7 6. 7 3.0 98.9 1965 1,500.2 1 117. 3 7.8 9. 1 5. 2 3.9 106.4 Malaysia 12 1966 860. 1 1 60.9 7. 1 4. 1 2. 4 1. 7 56.6 Sarawak 1964 145. 7 1 j~* 5 7.9 .2 . 2 (2) 11.2 1965 225.9 12. 1 5.8 ~. 1 ~. 1 (2 7) 12.0 January-June 1966. . . . 83. 1 6. 7 8.0 . 1 . 1 (2) 6.6 Singapore 1966 1,328.3 1 96. 7 7.3 6. 3 3. 2 3. 1 88.8 Pakistan 1964 997.4 36.9 8.7 20. 6 9.3 11.3 16.3 1965 1,043. 1 49. 6 4.8 31.2 17. 4 13.8 18.4 1966 899. 7 76. 4 8. 5 47.9 20. 3 27. 6 28.5 Taiwan 1964 428.0 .9 . 2 (2) (2) (3) 13~ 9 1965 556.0 . 1 (14) (2) (2) (3) 13 1 1966 622. 4 . 1 (14) . 1 . 1 (*) (2 13) Thailand 1964 666.4 6.5 1.0 6.5 4.5 2.0 (*) 1965 731. 7 8. 6 1. 2 8. 6 5.9 2. 7 (2) 1966 1, 173. 7 9. 7 . 8 9. 7 6.9 2.8 (2) COUNTRIES IN OCEANIA Australia 1964 2,973.0 1 39.0 1.3 16. 0 14.0 2.0 22.6 1965 3,353~4 1 53.8 1.6 27. 1 24.8 2.3 26.3 1966 3,196.8 144.1 1.4 17.4 15.9 1.5 26.4 New Zealand 1964 881. 6 4. 7 . .5 2. 4 2. 0 . 4 2.3 1965 967.5 6.2 .6 2.8 2. 4 . 4 3.4 1966 997.9 7. 2 . 7 3. 1 2. 7 . 4 4. 1 LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES Argentina 1964 1,077.2 16.5 1.5 16.3 13.4 2.9 .2 1965 1,198.4 31.5 2.6 31.2 13.3 17.9 .3 1966 1, 124.3 33.9 8.0 33. 5 15. 3 18.2 .4 Bolivia 1964 102.7 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 (2) (*) 1965 133.9 2.0 1. 5 2. 0 2. 0 (2) (*) 1966 138. 4 I 2. 1 1. 5 2. 1 2. 1 (2) (2) See footnotes at end of table. 78 PAGENO="0260" 1 Includes imports from Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam. 2 Less than $0.05 million. Not reported in the source. 4 Figures are based on import licenses issued. East Cameroon only. Not available. 7 May be incomplete. 8 Excludes Zanzibar. Year ending March of stated year. 10 Data are exports to Indonesia, derived from Eastern European sources. 11January~-June 1964. 15 States of Malaya only. 13 Chinese goods imported via Hong Kong. 14 Less than 0.05 percent. 15 Data are estimates. 16 Year ending September of stated year. *None 692 TABLE 3D.-IMPORTs OF SELECTED FREE-WORLD COUNTIIIEs FROM THE WORLD AND FROM COMMUNIST AlcEAs, 1964-66----Continued (Millions of dollars) Imports from Importin~~ --~i~-- World Total Eastern Europe and ~____________ Communist Asia Value Percent of world Europe Ea~ern Eastern excluding Europe, U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. . munist Com- China .6 (2) (2) (2) (3) (3) (2) 106.3 130.0 85.0 (2) .1 (6) 27. 6 35.0 36.6 (2) .5 .4 (3) (3) 411.4 420.0 479.0 (2) (2) (6) .4 .~ (6) (4) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (3) LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES- continued Brazil 1964 1965 1966 Chile 1964 1965 January-November 1966 Colombia 1964 1965 1966 Cuba 1964 1965 1966 12 Ecuador 1964 1965 1966 Guyana 1964 1965 1966 Haiti 16 1964 1965 Honduras 1964 1965 1966 Jamaica 1964 1965 1966 Mexico 1964 1965 1966 Peru 1964 1965 1966 Surinam 1964 1965 Trinidad and Tobago 1964 1965 1966 Uruguay 1964 1965 1966 Venezuela 1964 1965 1966 1,263.5 1,096.4 1,496.2 667.2 604.2 626. 6 586.3 453. 5 674. 3 1,014.6 865.0 900.0 152.0 170.8 171.9 87.4 104.3 117.8 35.9 37.1 101. 6 121.9 149.0 281.8 294A 320.9 1,492.9 1,559.6 1,605.2 579.9 729. 7 817.2 80.2 95.2 422.8 474.6 456.8 198.4 150.7 164.2 1,149.7 1,323.1 1,188.3 69. 0 64. 4 73.0 2.0 2. 5 3.7 8. 5 10. 0 11.9 688.6 645.0 682.0 1.5 1.2 1 1.6 2. 1 2.9 ~ 2.8 1.7 2.3 1.8 1.5 1.1 .3 .2 (3) 4. 1 5. 7 3.7 1.6 2.1 3. 1 .1.5 1.9 3. 1 2.1 3. 0 7.0 9.0 8.4 5.5 5.9 4.9 .3 .4 .6 1.5 2.2 1.8 65.9 74.6 75.8 1.0 .7 .9 2.4 2.8 2.4 4.7 6.2 1.8 1.3 .7 .3 .4 .2 .3 .3 .4 1.9 2.0 1.5 1.4 1.8 .6 .7 .7 68.4 64. 4 73. 0 2.0 2.4 3. 5 8.5 10.0 11.9 562.3 515.0 592.0 1.4 1.2 (6) 1.5 2.0 ~1.9 1.6 2.2 1.8 1.5 1. 1 .3 .2 (3) 4. 1 5.6 3.6 1.6 2. 1 3. 1 .4 .5 .6 3. 1 2.0 2.9 6.6 8.4 7.9 40.8 29. 4 36.4 2.0 1.9 3. 1 8. 5 10. 0 11.2 150.9 95.0 113.0 1.4 1.2 (6) 1.1 1.5 ~1.2 1.6 2.2 1.8 1.5 1.1 .3 .2 (3) 4.0 4.9 3.5 1.6 2.1 3.1 .3 .3 .6 2.8 1.7 99 6.5 8.3 7.9 (2) (2) (4) (2) (2) (3) (2) .6 .9 .9 .1 .1 .1 .1 1.1 1.4 .7 (2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2) .2 (3) (3) (3) NOTE. Data for 1964-66 are shown wherever they are available. (3) (3) (2) (2) .4 .6 .5 .3 .3 .7 .1 .1 (2) 74 PAGENO="0261" Co~ Co Co Co Co CC CC Co CC Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co CC CC Co CC CC Co ~4 Co Co Co Co Co ~o Co Co CC Co CC CC Co ~.J CC Co CC Co ~4 . * * . . . . . . - . . . CC* . * . . . . . * . . . * . . Qt~1 . ~o C~CC CCC . Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co Co CCC CCC... *. CC ZtCC - . 0 CC o . ~tCC 0 CCCCCC ~ ~CCC~ CoCo CbCCCC-' !~!!E!!!!~ !!!!~!!~! ~CCCCC~CoCCC.~CC !!~!~!~ !~~~!!~!!! !!!!!!!~!! !~! !!~ ~0CC00 000 oCCCCCC00000 ~CC0000 ~0o0oCCCo 00 CCCCCCCC00CC 000C0 CoO 00-Co - CC Co CCC ~ - Co CC Co ~ Co ~C Co -~ Co CC CC Co ~ -1 Co CC -~ CC ~ 000 ~ Co CC CC CC 00CC CCC Co Co CC Co CC 0 CC CC 0 00 co 0000 -~ -~ -~ CC~S CC CC 00 ~ COO 00 CCC CC 00000 O~ C0-OOCCC CC CC 0CC-CCOCC ~-0o~OoCO CO CCCC*- ~0~-CCCC CCCOCC0COCCC~&CC CCCCCCo-CCCCCo CC0CCCCCCCCC-0Co CoC.COCCCoCCCCCCCOCo CCCCoCCCC0CCCCoCCC~Co C-'CCCCCCCoCoCoCCCC-1 CCCCCCCC'CCC CCC.CC- CCCCCC0-0CO~CC `0' 0000C-C-CCCC~CCCCCC-' ~CoCCC~COCoCoCOC0~ ~C~CC CCCoCCC,~0CCC~CC-5CC CoCC-1Co ~.CCCCCC~ CCCCCCCC' .000Co~00-0CC1CoCo 00C~Co~COCCCCC~ CCCCCCCCC~ 00~CCCo~Co-I~0~ CC~Co-J~CC OCoOCCo-OCoCoCCO CCC-CCCoCo~CoCCCCC0 CoCoCCCCCC0~CCC~ `CCCCCCCCo~CCC0CCC~ 000 ~0CoCoCoCo-1~ t~t~ CC ~0 CC 00CC CC 000 CO Co 000CC 000000 Co CC CC 00000 CC~~ CC ~- CC CC 0000 Co 0CC -~ CC CC 0 COO 00CC ~0 Co CC Co Co -~ -1 Co Co CC CC CCC CC CCCC CC CC Co CCC Co 00CC 00CC 0000 00~ CCC 00~- o~0~e9o~0*09o COO ~0 00CC CC 0000CC CC 00 -0 000000 CO 0000 CO 000000 00 -~ PAGENO="0262" 694 CO ~ Co* C cc - C) ~ ~ CO I - ~C C) - C) C) ° ~° ~ ~~c~-cc~ 2~~ ~ 0 - C) CC CO CO `~ 0 C) ~ C) C) C) COO C) ~ CC 0CC C) C) Co - o E ~ ~ ~ ~CC~ ~ E o Co co 0 ~ ~o CCC'. ~ Co Co CC C- CO C- ~ C) ~ CC CO C) ~ C) ~C ~ c~cT~~ C~ C/) C) CO ~4 CC 0 Co C) Co C) ~ C) CC Co C) CC CC C'- CC s~ ~ ~ CO o0~ ~ 0 ~ 0 CCC) - C) C- CO - ,~,CO C- C) - °C)C) C) ~C 00CC C) CC CC) ~ ~ ~ CO Co COC-C)OCCCC COCOCOCoOCo CC0'-4~COCOC)C)CO C) - C) Co0C)'4C)C-CO ~ CC ~ ~ 0 C'. CO Co 0 __________________________ 0 - C)) Co C-CC - .-4 Co CO `-4 - C- - COO COO C) Co Co CC ~) CC C- CO ~ Co C) ci5~ *~c~C~ ~ ~ ~ ,~ C) CCC) CO C) C) Co CO COO 0 CC Co - CC - CO - COO CO C) C) C) ~ ~rii _______________________ 00 0 0 CCC) - CO C- CO ~` C) Co Co C) C) ~4 C- C) - C- C) ~C ,-4 CO C-C) Co 00 C) `~ ~ -g ______________ O ~ *~ 0 00CC 0-C COO `~ Co Co C') CO C) C") C) CC) CC Co CO .~ 0 C- 00 CO CO `C' 0 0 C~C4~0 ©-CC-~C C'~1'C'COCC z ~ O)COCO t-COC)C)~-4CCCO~-C OCC)CO~COC)COCCC)'C4~COCOCO'C' ~L) C)C)L'-~)'-4~ C~COC)COC-CC0COCCCO0~Co~ C~CO0'-' o0~ - ~ 0 ~ C) CC ~ C-CO C- Co CO CO COO Co - CCC) C) C) .0 CO C) C- C) `CCC) C) - C) - r~0Q CO~C)C ~ ~0CO0C)C-COC)COCoCoC)C)CCCOCOOC-C)~C)CO CCC) CO C- C) C) ~ CO Co CO Co 0CC CO `C' `C' CC Co C' Co `CCC) C) - Co C- Co C' C) ~ C~ C)'C'OCO 0 .~ 0 . . 0 C.)C)COC)~ .~ ~ I 2 I F 4#~0 CC 0 C) 00 - 0 0 CC 0 76 PAGENO="0263" 00 00 ~ COCOC 00 00 0 .,-`--~~ 0,00 CO 000000 0 *1 ~ 000000 C- 000000 0 ~ ~ 00 -o~ ~ 000000 Co *40000 0 G,00- CO 00 - 0O-',00 CO CO 0~ 00 CO CO 00000000 Co 00 ~oCOC0C-*~ ~ ~ 0 CO 00000000 Co 00 Cot'- CO 0000 C'- CO 0000 C' OCO C-00'-*OOOO CO CO CO 00 CO COO 0000 O~4 C-0000C000C- 00000000 ~4 0000 CO C- ~4 0 ~4 000 Co CO a~cc ~ Co CO ~ 00 , Co ~4 ~ `-40000 COCo C- ~cc,44*; -~ ~` CO ~ ~4 ~4 C-CO Co 00004'- 00 Co 00 Co ~ 00 0100 CO C- 0 -~ CC 0000 C- ~ COt- 000000 CO CoCO~'CO 00,00CO CO CO C-COOl `-*00000 OCOCO00000 00 CO 695 Co Co CO CO Cl t- Co Co COO Co ~ Co CO CO Co Co 00 CO ~ CO ,-4 CoCOCO00~CO~Co~ COCOCO~00 CO Co Co Co ~ CoOl ~ Co 00000 ~ CO CO 00 4- COt- Co CO Co Co~0,COCO~ CO CO Co~ 49 ~ ~j Co Co CO CO CO CO 010000 CO C- 00 Cl 00 Cl Co Co C'- 00 0 Co0401 C- 0O00COC'-!~ 00 00 Cl ~t- Co Co Co Co CO C- 00000000 COO CO C- ~ Co 00 0 C- 0 40 ~ 0,00Co CO Co CO 040 C1Co000 CO COO CO 00 CO ~ CO C- Co Co CO ~ ClCOCOt- 400001 00 CO 0 C- 0000400 ~ CO CO CO CO 00 00 COOl CO 00000 CO ~` Cl ~C CO 000000 C'- CO Cl C- Co 00 Cl Co CO Cl C-CO 00000 CO 0000000 Cl Cl CO Co CO CO CO 0000 C- 0000 Co C- Co 0000 CO C- 0000 `-* 00 Co Cl 0000 Co ~ ~ ~ ~ ;~ CO Co 40 COO CoOCo00 CO 0000 Co 00 CC CoCO CO ;~ -~~- ~ Co Cl Cl 00 CO Co 00 C- Cl 00 CO 00 CO 00 01 Co C~C~ C- 00CO Co CO 00 CO 4 -~ 00 0 CO CO C- Co g 77 PAGENO="0264" `TABLE 5A.-EXPORTS OF THE FREE WORLD AND EUROPEAN COCOM COUNTRIES TO COMMUNIST AREAS, BY SELECTED COMMODITIES AND COMMODITY GROUPS, 1964-65--Continued (Millions of dollars) Exports to ~rtsfro~ Commodity and commodity Total Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Eastern Europe excluding U.S.S.I'I. U.S.S.R. Communist China Free world' COCOM European countries Free world' COCOM European countries Free world' COCOM European countries Free world' ~ COCOM European countries 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 group 1tAanufactured good8, other, total- Continued Copper and semimanufac- tures 52.5 86.9 23.8 57.7 29. 6 46.3 14.5 32.5 13.9 16.4 3.5 2.0 9.0 24.2 5.8 23.2 Base metals and manufactures, other 129.6 178. 1 57.2 91.2 79.4 108.4 39.9 59.4 44.2 50.8 13.7 16.5 5.5 18.7 3.5 15.3 - Clothing and footwear 72.2 106.3 10.7 26.5 28.7 41.7 5.6 11.8 43.4 63.9 5.1 14.7 (3) .2 (3) (3) Instruments 33.5 54.3 23.3 33.9 19.3 24.4 15.4 19.2 6.3 11.0 3.8 5.7 7.8 18.7 4.0 8.9 Manufactured goods, other . . . 128.6 180.3 72.9 104.0 88.4 119. 1 61.7 74.1 29.9 31.8 7.2 7.4 8.7 28.2 3.3 21.9 Odher and unspecified ?nerchan- disc 504.0 692.4 20.0 24.1 108.0 162.2 18.1 15.4 296.9 393.5 5.5 8.0 94.0 118.8 1.0 .5 NoTE.-Because of limitations in original source materials, values of commodities munist areas, 351.0 and 463.9; Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. 35.0 and 74.9 arid groups shown above are known to be `somewhat understated and should not be U.S.S.R. 261.0 and 324.9 CommunIst China, 51.0 and 52.6; and Outer Tlongolia, NortI cc.nsidered exact measures of exports in each commodity group. Korea, an'd North Vlet-l4am, 4.0 and 11.5. 2 exports to Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Viet-Nam, in millions `Cuban exports are included in the free-world totals and in other merchandise but of dollars for 1964 and 1965: Free-world total, 37.3 and 64.8; European, COCOM total, excluded from thecommodity detail as follows, In millions of dollars for 1964 and 1965: 11.7 and 16.2. Total Communist areas, 415.8 and 54'6.5; Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R., 55.5and 10~.5.0; U.S.S.R., 274.9 and 375.0; Communist China 81.4 and 55.0; and Outer Mongolia, 3 Less than $0.05 million. Nmrth Korea, and North Viet-Nam, 4.0 and 11.5. Exports of sugar were: Total Com- *None or negligible. 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C- C- CC ~` C- eq ~ - 000CC ~` ~o eq - 0-~ 0)~ ~ t-,-~ C) 1- "4 C) 000000 "4CC eq C) 00CC ~ C-C- CC 0000 `3 0000 CCC) 1-0000 ~` 0000 ~~eqeqeq03*CCC)CCeq0003C-~~CC CC 0000 ~ `0~C~ 0)00 ,400 eq 03 00 eq 4)) ` t- eq eq CC C)000~'CCCO C~i)4~CC3 `~ 1000 ~ "4 000000000000 0'-4 C) ~4 CCC) C) 00000 ~` ~4 C- eq 00 eq C'.~)) C) 100000 C'. 0CC C) eq eq "40000000000 CC ~ 0 ~ t'-~ CC 00 ~` CC 00 ))4'*C0 ))1C'- CC0~1-.00C)~C- "4 0)00 eq ~ eq 0 0) eq 000 C) C) 000000 ~ 0 CC CCC) eq CC))) eq 0)00000CC 003 CCCC C'~00~CC~CC~C- 0"4C) CC CC 00000 ~ ~ eq t-t-eq eq 0 000 CCC) CC 0000 0001-0 ~ 1-030) `-4CC CO C) ~ 0)-4C) 0 ~ 00 eq C) CCCC40'0'CCCC030CCCC~4CC000CCCCCC C) C-CC CCC) CC eq C-CC C0) CC 1'- ~,.4~,-u~.o)~)eqCCeq CO C~CC CC,~eqeq *~ 4)00 ~..Ci -~ . .~.. ~ ~ ~J:':~:~~ ~:~::~ 80 PAGENO="0267" 699 .-.~ 0 0 ~ c31 o~i~ EZ~ ;3; ~ *~ ~ ~ji:ii ~ o ~ 3000 bG 0 *~ 0 ~ ~ `do ~ 00 ~ h c~ ~ u)0 `~`b~ d~ 0'd*~0 u)t~0 0~)4 *~)~0 0~ Th~o ~ ~E ~ ~E0 ~ ~ ~ b~ 3.,'*~00 *~*~ ~ 00~ :~ ~ ~ ~r0co~ ~ *0 ~0 ~ ~O ~d - 003) ~ oh h~ ~EP~°~ ~3)C) *~0~ 10:0 o0~ f*'~-"0 0'd~ 0 *~ Q0c3 9~ -*~~ 30 Cd Cd 0) ~ ,-~ ~ c;ç'~-~ C3) ` 30 ~4 0 *c'c~ ~-` c' *;~`~~ `~-~-`~-` Cd ~ CO `-4 ~ ~ ~ 30 0 ~ C~ 0 03 ~ c~ c~ C~ 0) ~c0 03- ` 03 ~i 03 Cd 0) CO ~ 00 ~ `-4 C') 0 CO 0 4030 C') ~ 300400 ~) C') Cd 3000) ~ 030 03 C') 3-3-300 `-403 C') 0340 Cd 0 ~ , 3- Cd 3- 83) 03033- CO - C0C0 Cd 0) ~4 03000 ~ - ~ 3-03 0 ;~ Cd Q3 Cd 03 0300 ~ Cd 3'- 3030 30 Cd 3- 003-0 ~ ? ~CO0~ `- 3-0-400 ~ G) ;~ 40 ~` 0 83) 03300 03 ~CO~ 3000 0 Cd 03 ~0 0)003 ~ Cd -g~eo 0303-00 C')~ ii, ~ :~*~ ,,,.`0v~ 00 0 0 4.8 *.***~ **..**~ ~83)0~0 ~! ~ .833 3) E `0 0 * **cZ 81 PAGENO="0268" z Cl) 0 - .~ Cl) z 0 0 Co Co 8 ~ Co~ ~ ~`-~ ~, * .l)~ **:~* ~ **~Co~* :D ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ h~ ~~00 ~r~o ooZ~ 700 ~ Co ~2 ~ §(~~ ~ C0C9~'-4 Co~ Co ~ 8~ `*~*0 - ~ 1 Co~ ~2 ~ o_~ CO ~ Co'.4 `.4 ~- c~ C~ c~' ~- Co ~ Cl) Co Co *0 Co 0*0 ~ CP~ ~ *0 ~ ~-~- 80 CO - CO ~ Co Co 04 C4~Co~~ ~ 0 `4 0 CO 0 0 0 `4 1z~ ~2 ~ 0 ©~ ~ Co ~---~ ~ CoCo*0Co~.*0 ~ Co~03~CO C- *0~Co~*0 c~ ~ C- ~ ~ C-Cl) ~ ~O4~ Cl) `.4 `.4 `003 ~ 03*0C-~ ~- 03 ~f1 Cl) 988004 `.4~C 04 ~ *00CC `.4*0*0 04 Co03' 043-80 ,~t- CC Co 09 04 82 PAGENO="0269" 701 0 E E 0 0 c4 ci:~ cCC~ ~ IC - Co ~o CCC CCC ~CC CC CCC CCC CCC CC) CO - CO CCC C~ CCC CC CCC CC) C- C- CO ~ CCC CO ~ CO ~ C~C~ t'.COCOCC) ~ ~CCC~CC ~C'-~N E~ C - ~: i:i ~! - C) CI) rCl 0 0 0 C) C) z U) U).... -o OE~ 0~-. 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C) CD ~ E * * . ~.* CD - :::::::~:::.:::~::.:~~:::::: :::::::::::::~:::::::::::. 0 ~ ~1~z CD a9~ ~CD~ c'z~ ~ C 0.~ ~ ~ P2~ 0 -~ C CD CD CD ~ CD ~ 0 COCD ~ ~CDC C~ CCD ~ CDCC) E CD~ ~ o ~ o CDCD ~ C) 0 C CD C C. tn tn 0 tn tn 0 ~ CJD 0 ~ iZ C. ~ 0 0 z rID tn rID C-) w * ~. . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~-4 ~OO o~ 333. ~ ~ ~ CD CD CDb~CDCD~ C) CC CDI ~~43 ~`~-occ ~ ~c~n ~ -`4 CD ~ CD C CD CD ,~ CD CD ~ -~ bD CC CD ~ C `4CC ~ CD CD CD CD CD ~ ~ 3CDCDLCO bD -4 CD 4 ~ CD CD -4 CD CC CC C 4 ~ CD CD `40) D" CC -4 CD CD CD CC CC ~. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~. ~ C)t~DCC'4O© ~-`t~.)CC CDCCDCDC~.DCDCDC"-4CD CD1 C)CDCC)~ CCCDCD~CC CCDCCCCD'4C)CD CC I ~. ~poI~33p~c~. ~ CCC-4~CC CD'CDCD~ CCCCCDb~CDCD-4CDCDCDCCCD ~b3-4XCD-4OO 4C)CD~DCDCDD'CD-4CDtDC)~D~)" CC ~. ~ ~ `4CC~CCCCt~D ~P-0'4CD `4 CCCC~"4CC-' -~ CC ~. ~ ~ CDCCDCCD ~ C ç3~~ ODICC t~ ~CDC CDCDCDCDCD~C)CDtD CDCD11~ ~` ~-h~ ~3ç~3pn~p, ~ ~ CCDbD~-'CD C CD-i bD'4'4'4CD~CDb3CC CD'4 CD `4~, ~ ~ CDCOCCt~ CD CCCDC'4t~D-4CCD~C)-'CD)' CD ~` CD ~ ~ P~3~** ~ CCD,~C~C CDCt0b~CCCCCbDCDCD~-4CDC b~CD CD PAGENO="0272" 704 TABLE 7B.-TRADE OF FREE WORLD AND OF U.S.S.R. WITH CUBA, BY PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES, 1963-65 (Millions of dollai's) Commodity and commodity group Free world - 1963 1964 1965 U.S.S.R. -_____ 1963 1964 1965 145.9 288.1 208.8 399.8 366.0 375.4 Exportato Cuba,total Food and beverages Crude materials Mineral fuels and related materials Crude petroleum Fuel oils Mineral fuels and related materials, other Fats and oils Chemicals Medicines and pharmaceuticals Chemicals, other Machinery Power.generating machinery Electric power machinery and switchgear Machinery, other Transport equipment Trucks Transport equipment, other Manufactured goods, othei Other and unspecified merchandise Imports from Cuba,total Sugar, sugar preparations, and honey Tobacco and manufactures Other and unspecified merchandise 56.1 7.3 4.3 (*) 2.7 1.6 1.8 29.8 18.6 11.2 9.7 2.7 .9 6. 1 1.9 .3 1.6 26.5 8.5 100.7 13.6 .2 (*) (.) .2 3.2 36. 7 5.7 31.0 40.2 3.5 3.1 33.6 15.2 4.8 10.4 64.7 13. 6 66.0 3.8 (*) 1 2:5 10.7 1.9 8.8 36.4 4.3 3.1 29.0 36.2 4.6 31.6 46.8 6.3 91.6 15.3 56.8 43.4 .3 13. 1 10.2 21.5 2.4 19.1 96.8 } 4.6 92.2 39.3 10.8 28.5 43.2 25. 1 80.3 25.6 60.3 39.1 7.3 13.9 1.4 17.5 1.3 16.2 76.1 ç 2.0 .5 73.6 55.9 18.4 37.5 40.2 8.7 92.6 33. 5 62.8 41.1 8.2 13.5 .8 23.1 .9 22.2 69.7 1.7 1.1 56.9 43.0 .6.0 37.0 48.8 11.1 342.2 303.7 6.2 32.3 247. 7 297.5 185.7 164.4 288.0 226.2 259.0 141.7 11.5 13.5 16.6 10.0 25.0 27.4 136.9 3.7 23.8 247.9 8.2 31.9 NoTE-Figures are compilations of unadjusted data as reported by free-world countries and the U.S.S.R. `None or negligible. 86 PAGENO="0273" 705 84th Quarterly Report 2d Quarter 1968 Export Control Oc Co4 by the Secretary of Commerce to the President, the Senate, and the House of Representatives 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 18 PAGENO="0274" 706 Letter of Transmittal AUGUST 14, 1968. THE PRESIDENT THE HONORABLE PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE THE HONORABLE SPEAKER OF THE HousE OF REPRESENTATIVES SIRS: I have the honor to submit herewith the Eighty-Fourth Quarterly Report, covering the second quarter 1968, as required under the Export Control Act of 1949. Respectfully submitted. 1/Ik Secreta~'y Commerce PAGENO="0275" 707 Contents Page I. Introduction 1 II. Security Export Controls 4 III. Special Foreign Policy Export Controls 29 IV. Short Supply Export Controls 31 V. Export Control Enforcement Activities 33 VI. The Commodity Control List as of June 30, 1968 38 VII. Supplementary Trade Tables: A. U.S. Exports and Imports by Areas, 1961-67 and January-March 1968 44 B. U.S. Exports to and Imports From Eastern Europe and Communist Areas in Asia, 1961-67 and January-March 1968 45 C. U.S. Exports to Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965-67 46 D. U.S. Imports From Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965-67 48 Appendix-Export Control Act of 1949, as amended 50 a PAGENO="0276" PAGENO="0277" 709 I Introduction The Export Control Act of 1949, as amended, provides the Pres- ident with the authority to prohibit or curtail exports from the United States, its territories, and possessions; and authorizes him to delegate this authority to such departments, agencies, and officials of the Government as he deems appropriate. The export control authority, which has been delegated to the Secretary of Commerce, is administere4~ by the Office of Export Control of the Bureau of International Commerce. The Act authorizes controls over exports for three purposes- "national security," "foreign policy," and "short supply." National security controls, and short supply controls as required, are always coordinated to reflect U.S. foreign policy and international responsi- bilities. In addition, the 1965 amendment to the Act included a policy statement that the United States opposes restrictive trade practices or boycotts by foreign countries against other countries friendly to the United States, and required exporters to report to the Secretary of Commerce any requests they receive for information or for action that would interfere with normal trade relations such as restrictive trade practices and boycotts. National security controls are instituted to provide control of exports from the standpoint of their significance to the security of the United States. They include an embargo on exports to Communist China, North Korea, the Communist-controlled area of Vietnam, and Cuba, as well as broad controls over exports to the U.S.S.R. and other Eastern European areas. Controls to free world countries apply to a highly selected list of commodities and technical data to prevent their unauthorized diversion or reexport to the foregoing countries, thus frustrating U.S. controls over shipments to them. Short supply controls, as directed by the policy of the Act, are used only when it becomes necessary to protect the domestic economy from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the inflation- ary impact of abnormal foreign demand. With two exceptions, the Department of Commerce controls exports from the United States, its territories, and possessions through either the issuance of a "validated license" or the establishment of a 1 PAGENO="0278" 710 "general license" authorizing such shipments. The two exceptions, which require neither a validated nor a general license, are: exports from the United States to its territories, and most 1 exports to Canada for internal consumption. A validated license is a formal document issued to an exporter by the Department. It authorizes the export of commodities within the specific limitations of the document. It is based upon a signed application submitted by the exporter. A general license is a broad authorization issued by the Department of Commerce which permits certain exports under specified con- ditions. Neither the filing of an application by the exporter nor the issuance of a license document is required in connection with any general license. The authority to export in such an instance is given in the Comprehensive Export Schedule, published by the Department of Commerce, which specifies the conditions under which each general license may be used. For purposes of export control, all destinations (excluding Canada) are divided into seven Country Groups:2 GroupS, Southern Rhodesia; Group T, all countries of the Western Hemisphere, excluding Canada and Cuba; Group W, Poland (including Danzig) and Rumania; Group X, Hong Kong and Macao; Group Y, Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslo- vakia, East Germany (Soviet Zone of Germany and the Soviet Sector of Berlin), Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Outer Mongolia, and the U.S.S.R. (including the Pacific Region); Group Z, Communist China, North Korea, Communist-controlled area of Vietnam, and Cuba; and Group V, all other countries, excluding Canada. Canada is not included in any Country Group. The Commodity Control List is a numerical listing by Export Control Commodity Number of all commodities for which export licensing authority is exercised by the Department of Commerce. It identifies for each listed commodity the destinations for which a validated export license is required. (For example, a commodity requires a validated license for shipment to a specific destination if the Group symbol for that destination appears in column 4 entitled "Validated License Required for Country Groups Shown Below," unless the export is specifically authorized under a general license.) The export of commodities to destinations other than Canada for which a validated license is not required, may be made under general license G-DEST. This Commodity Control List is maintained on a current basis through the periodic issuance of Current Export Bulletins, which are supplements to the Comprehensive Export Schedule. 1 than commodities related to nuclear weapons, nuclear explosive devices or nuclear testing and certain technical data. For further detail, see Comprehensive Export Schedule, paragraph 370.1(g). 2 PAGENO="0279" 711 Regulations concerning the export of technical data, including validated license requirements therefor, are covered in the Compre- hertsive Export Schedule, Part 385. The Department of Commerce, through its Bureau of International Commerce, exercises control over all exports from the United States, except: 1. Commodities for the official use of or consumption by the Armed Forces of the United States, and commodities for general consumption in occupied areas under their jurisdiction, when the transport facilities of the Armed Forces are used to carry such shipments. 2. Commodities exported by the Department of Defense pursuant to section 414 of the Mutual Security Act of 1954. 3. Arms, ammunition, implements of war (including helium), technical data relating thereto, and certain classified information, which are licensed by the Department of State. 4. Gold (except fabricated gold with a gold content value of 90 percent or less) and United States coins containing silver, which are licensed by the Treasury Department. 5. Source material, "byproduct material," special nuclear material, and facilities for the production or utilization of special nuclear material (except components for such facilities, which are licensed for export by the Bureau of International Commerce), and technical data relating thereto, which are licensed by the Atomic Energy Commission. 6. Vessels, other than vessels of war, and vessels exported for scrapping abroad, which are licensed by the U.S. Maritime Administration, Department of Com- merce. 7. Natural gas and electric energy, which are licensed by the Federal Power Commission. 8. Tobacco seed and plants, which are licensed by the Department of Agri- culture. 9. Narcotic drugs and marihuana, which are licensed by the Department of Justice. The Act, as amended, is reproduced in the appendix. 3 PAGENO="0280" 712 II Security Export Controls U.S. Trade With Eastern Europe' Exports U.S. exports to the U.S.S.R. and other Eastern European countries during the first quarter 1968 totaled $55.2 million.2 This compares with exports of $41.6 million in the previous quarter and $7 1.8 million in the first quarter 1967. Exports to these countries in the first quarter 1968 represented 0.7 percent of total U.S. exports for that period. Poland received $21.6 million of the first quarter 1968 exports and the U.S.S.R. $14.9 million. Other destinations were East Germany, $6.3 million; Czechoslovakia, $4.9 million; Rumania, $3.9 million; Hungary, $2.1 million; and Bulgaria, $1.4 million. Agricultural commodities, valued at $19.4 million, were the prin- cipal exports to Poland. These included unmilled corn, $4.9 million; soybeans, $3.5 million; raw cotton, $3.4 million; oilseed cake and meal, $2 million; wheat, $1.7 million; and animal and vegetable oils, $1.1 million. Exports of unmilled corn to East Germany totaled $4.3 mil- lion and to Czechoslovakia $2.4 million. Shipments of soybean oilcake and meal to Hungary were valued at $1.2 million, to Czechoslovakia, $0.9 million, and to Bulgaria, $0.9 million. In all, agricultural com- modities valued at $32.9 million were exported to Eastern Europe during the first quarter. Exports to the U.S.S.R. included aluminum oxide, valued at $4.3 million; hides and skins, $2.1 million; nonelectric machinery, $1.8 million; woodpulp, $1.7 million; agricultural insecticides, $1.2 million; and other chemicals, $1.8 million. Exports to Rumania included various machinery, totaling $1.4 million. Imports U.S. imports from these same Eastern European countries during the first quarter 1968 amounted to $58.5 million. This compares with 1 The term "Eastern Europe" as used throughout this report is employed in a special sense, and is defined to include the following areas: Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany (including the Soviet Sector of Berlin), Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland (including Danzig), Rumania, and the U.S.S.R. 2 Export and import data for the second quarter 1968 were not available when this report was written. 4 PAGENO="0281" 713 $38.4 million imported in the previous quarter and $53.6 million imported in the first quarter 1967. Imports from these countries during the first quarter 1968 represented 0.8 percent of total U.S. imports for that period. Poland accounted for $26 million of this total, principally in canned hams and preserved pork, $11.7 million; iron and steel products, $2.8 million; unwrought aluminum, $1.6 million; textiles, $1.3 million; and fur skins, $1.1 million. Imports from the U.S.S.R. were valued at $20.7 million, including platinum group metals, $11.3 million; diamonds, $3.5 million; and chrome ore, $1.7 million. Commodities valued at $5.8 million were imported from Czechoslovakia, including various machinery and tools, $1.6 million; glass and glassware, $1 mfflion; and leather footwear, $1 million. Other imports from Eastern Europe included $2.1 million from Bulgaria, principally inedible molasses, $1.2 million. 5 PAGENO="0282" UaS. TRADE WITH EASTERN EUROPE Million $ 180 QUARTERLY, 1960-1968 160 140 120 ` U.S. EXPORTS TO EASTERN EUROPE 100 o~J 60 A U.S. iMPORTS FROM A 40 EASTERN EUROPE A' 20 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~- 0 ~ 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 PAGENO="0283" 715 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968 [Thousands of dollars] Commodity 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH BULGARIA Exports, total 3,631 4,219 1,446 Baby chicks 16 30 Grain sorghums 17 101 Soybean oilcake and meal 1,207 2,802 881 Meat and fish meal, inedible 345 Tobacco, unmanufactured 19 29 Cattle hides, undressed 90 Clay, including calcined 17 Seeds for planting 1 11 82 Lubricating oils and greases 6 28 Polychlor insecticides 57 Organic chemicals, other 17 (1) 1 Antibiotics, bulk 101 91 41 Hormones, bulk 48 38 Vitamins and fish liver oils, for retail 90 136 Medicaments, other 414 206 26 Plastic resins 182 15 Plastic materials, other 20 Herbicidal preparations 187 Chemicals, other 26 13 3 Card punching and auxiliary machinery 11 10 Textile machinery and parts 375 61 Pulp mill machines, new 348 Paper cutting and paper products manufacturing machinery and parts 108 Fruit and vegetable processing machines 32 Boring and drilling machines for mining and construction 318 Glassworking machinery and parts 35 Heating and cooling equipment 30 Gas compressors 21 Pumps, centrifuges, and parts, other 20 6 Taps, cocks, valves, and similar appliances 30 Electric circuit apparatus 31 25 Electronic navigational aids 122 12 Telecommunications apparatus, other 19 1 (1) Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus 7 18 32 Machinery, other 26 41 1 Professional, scientific, measuring , and controlling instruments and ap- paratus 42 16 3 Developed motion picture film 6 7 13 Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts 12 5 1 Pen nibs and nib points 15 5 2 Other domestic exports 9 19 1 Reexports 2 6 Imports, total 2,529 2,814 2, 100 Cheese 451 574 266 Nuts, edible 45 12 Plums, prunes, and prunelles, dried 4 49 5 Onions, dehydrated 45 51 6 Molasses, inedible 656 1,249 Paprika 914 551 428 Fennel 6 22 3 Wild pig and hog skins 72 Hare fur, undressed 24 Mustard seeds, whole 33 Poppyseed 21 2 Silk,raw 84 40 Plants and parts used in perfumery, pharmacy, or insecticides - 70 42 32 Crude materials, other 28 24 11 Beeswax, not bleached 15 Drugs and medicinals derived from benzenoid chemicals and products 23 Organic chemicals, other 15 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products 52 Roseoil 370 383 33 Wood snanufactures, except furniture 20 8 8 Carpets, carpeting, and rugs 53 87 15 Glass 44 25 Glassware 112 77 4 5'lotorcycles 3 32 Stamps 31 25 4 S'Ianufactured goods, other 24 52 12 Other imports 2 44 3 30 3 22 See footnotes at end of table. 7 PAGENO="0284" 716 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollarsi 37,336 19,155 4,897 8889 2372 54 67 6 15,435 4,026 90 878 403 120 1,332 849 892 46 34 12 95 2,531 1,614 262 39 63 24 12 55 32 345 324 2,095 1,713 397 166 261 438 128 539 202 19 59 504 276 59 57 13 283 159 95 174 10 23 139 14 112 95 22 2 51 82 95 30 92 30 23 52 1 74 71 55 61 42 8 77 17 13 394 249 113 339 645 80 4 55 99 277 1,881 5 236 56 65 149 3 83 1,428 45 56 68 6 83 151 419 5 945 85 13 26 84 3 19 127 27 234 24 44 13 100 103 68 41 51 226 124 47 36 46 24 55 143 71 24 49 58 15 139 220 110 18 71 1 130 86 134 124 157 41 17 102 12 - 44 96~ 92 46 Commodity 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH CZECHOSLOVAKIA Exports, total Corn, except seed Seedcorn, except sweet seedcorn Grain sorghums Navy beans, dried, except seed Hops Soybean oilcake and meal Tobacco, unmanufactured Cigarettes Cattle hides, undressed Calf and kip skins, undressed Fur skins, undressed Peanuts, shelled, green Soybeans Rubber, synthetic Woodpulp Sulfur, crude Asbestos, crude Vanadium ores and concentrates Tantalum ores and concentrates Crude materials, other Tallow, inedible Toluene diisocyanates Organic chemicals, other Inorganic chemicals Pigments, paints, and related materials Vitamins and fish liver oils for retail Medicinal and pharmaceutical products, other Regenerated cellulose and chemical derivatives Plastic materials, other Gum and wood resins Prepared culture media Chemicals, other Pencil slats Paper and paperboard Nonferrous base metals Tractors, tracklaying Electronic computers, digital Electronic computers, other Card punching and auxiliary machinery Parts for electronic data processing machines Office machines and parts, other Typewriters Sawing machines, metalcutting Rolling mill machinery and parts Gas operated welding, cutting, and similar machines and parts Textile and leather machinery and parts Paper, pulp, and paper processing machinery and parts Construction and mining machinery and parts Glassworking machinery and parts Underground mine loaders Trucks, industrial, electric Mechanical handling equipment, other Metal treating and metal powder molding machines Nonelectric machinery, other Telecommunications apparatus X-ray apparatus and parts Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and apparatus Developed motion picture film Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts Manufactured goods, other Other and unspecified domestic exports Reexports of sewing machines and parts 2 Reexports, other 2 See footnotes at end of table. 8 PAGENO="0285" 717 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Commodity 1966 ~Tanuary- 1967 March 1968 TRADE WITH CZECHOSLOVAKIA-Continued Imports, total 27, 695 26, ~i 5, 790 Canned cooked hams and shoulders 987 1,429 477 Meat and preparations, other 230 127 77 Sugar confectionery and other sugar preparations, except chocolate 121 238 73 Chocolate and preparations 83 92 33 Food, other 25 62 35 Alcoholic beverages 75 90 31 Wild pig and hog skins, undressed 387 36 Marten fur, undressed 58 19 Mink fur, undressed 127 42 Rabbit fur, undressed 126 100 6 Angora rabbit hair 16 561 48 Textile fibers and waste, other 71 8 9 Feathers and down, crude 48 53 6 Crude materials, other 64 24 Organic chemicals 237 261 27 Inorganic chemicals 49 53 11 Explosiyes and pyrotechnic products 268 242 9 Chemicals, other 34 58 17 Pig and hog leather 121 Wood manufactures, except furniture 86 97 28 Fabrics of vegetable textile fibers, except cotton and jute 125 136 36 Made-up textile articles 213 300 49 Textile yarn, fabrics, and related products, other 79 57 30 Drawn or blown glass, unworked, in rectangles 388 265 68 Imitation gem stones, except heads 1, 134 1, 350 483 Beads, bugles, and spangles of glass 923 803 224 Articles of glass beads, bugles, and spangles 95 161 35 Glassware, other 1, 242 1, 185 228 Pottery 192 265 63 Pig iron 2,218 Nails, screws, rivets, and similar articles 164 56 46 Chains and parts of iron or steel 99 97 6 Pins, needlds, and apparel fittings 39 67 25 Metal manufactures, other 65 76 36 Tractors, agricultural, wheeled, except garden 18 254 Typewriters 459 scs 25 Drilling machines, metalworking 181 168 22 Milling machines 775 621 81 Boring machines and vertical turret lathes 2,964 3,641 801 Lathes, other 1, 520 950 57 Grinding machines, metalcutting 349 151 33 Metalworking machinery, other 24 108 4 Textile machinery and parts 255 131 184 Printing machinery and parts 339 146 102 Metalworking machine tool parts 1,897 1, 080 19 Machines for molding or forming rubber or plastic articles, and parts 75 75 Nonelectric machinery, other 70 483 160 Electric power machinery and switchgear 62 Motorcycles and parts 552 201 17 Bicycles 215 260 35 Bicycle parts 674 730 127 Lighting fixtures and fittings 825 891 218 Bentwood furniture and parts 368 432 121 Furniture, other 26 60 13 Travel goods, handbags, and similar articles 51 86 28 Hats of felt, fur, and fur felt 170 236 19 Clothing, except of fur, other 31 55 9 Fur clothing and fur articles 47 Footwear, leather 3,474 4,241 952 Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and apparatus 56 78 19 Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts 183 138 23 Printed matter 891 937 196 Articles of plastic materials 32 52 13 Glass Christmas tree ornaments 98 131 (1) Nonmilitary firearms 89 99 12 Toys, games, and sporting goods, other 65 63 14 Works of art and collectors' items 147 213 48 Jewelry and wares of precious metals 111 74 17 Manufactured goods, other 185 221 65 Articles for exhibition 49 13 Other imports 241 3 262 3 64 See footnotes at end of table. 9 PAGENO="0286" 718 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Commodity 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH EAST GERMANY Exports, total 24,864 26,329 6,277 Meat fresh, chilled, or frozen 50 1,040 Barley 844 Corn, except seed 11,215 13,960 4,270 Grain sorghums 5,091 887 963 Oranges, fresh 387 652 Lemons fresn 323 318 Grapefruit, fresh 118 Grapefruit juice, canned, not frozen 315 Fruit and vegetable juices, other 280 Tobacco, unmanufactured 2,773 2,267 25 Tobacco manufactures 50 399 4 Calf skins, undressed 214 306 Soybeans 517 Rubber, synthetic 1 59 Wood, shaped or simply worked 44 2 Cotton linters 958 781 180 Crude materials, other 21 30 Coal, bituminous 1,610 868 363 Organic chemicals (1) 53 3 Paper and paperboard 138 229 Finished structural parts and structures of iron or steel 21 35 Agricultural machinery and implements 42 84 63 Electronic computers, digital 1,516 1, 156 91 Parts for electronic data processing machines 102 8 Office machines and parts, other 7 30 2 Textile machinery and parts 26 95 Pulp and paper mill machines and parts 80 Printing machines and parts 30 44 Boring and drilling machinery and parts 66 Air conditioners, self contained 33 10 Heating and cooling equipment for treatment of food 33 33 Pumps, centrifuges, and parts 30 Wrapping, packaging, filling, and similar machines and parts 48 Tobacco processing machines and parts 54 Metal treating and metal ~powder molding machines and parts 30 29 Nonelectric machinery, other 5 71 14 X-ray apparatus 94 2 Nuclear radiation detecting and measuring instruments 5 35 19 Physical properties testing and inspecting instruments 5 113 Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus, other 33 112 6 Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other 4 31 20 Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and appa- ratus 11 209 56 Recording magnetic tape and wire 77 51 Manufactured goods, other 32 35 13 Reexports 2 4 7 8,194 5,647 1,114 Imports, total Canned cooked pork Hops Wild pig and hog skins Mink fur, undressed Fur skins, undressed, other Cryolite or kryolith Crude materials, other Montan wax Nitrogenous compounds Carbon black and similar carbons Potassium ferricyanide Xylenols, crude Chemicals, other Pig and hog leather Drawn or blown glass, unworked, in rectangles Glassware Pottery Pig iron Bars, rods, angles, shapes, and sections of iron or steel Plates, sheets, and strip of brass Metal manufactures See footnotes at end of table. 10 58 25 100 56 800 396 137 27 (1) 115 21 22 365 351 89 26 76 121 13 36 48 8 118 86 9 19 43 22 334 36 11 39 10 305 365 108 146 106 40 3,236 1,344 7 31 40 22 9 4 PAGENO="0287" 719 Table 1.---United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] . Commodity 1966 1967 ~Fanuary- March 1968 TRADE WITH EAST GERMANY-Continued Typewriters Adding machines Office machines and parts, other Drilling machines, metalworking Mffiing machines, metalworking Boring machines and vertical turret lathes, metalworking Lathes, metalworking, other Textile machinery and parts Printing presses and parts Bakery machinery and parts Metalworking machine tool parts Radio-phonograph combinations Machinery, other Bicycle parts Binoculars, microscopes, and other optical instruments Photographic cameras and parts, except motion picture Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and appa- ratus, other Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts Printed matter Artificial fruit and flowers Manufactured goods, other Returned goods Other imports 280 52 73 51 104 240 24 70 258 38 4 173 51 231 34 305 53 87 36 158 63 25 ~107 80 6 1 38 17 329 64 219 81 60 28 271 49 34 57 513 86 68 27 133 107 6 3 135 11 10 30 8 1 68 7 (1) 65 12 256 24 16 42 41 26 7 3 25 TRADE WITH HUNGARY Exports, total 10,053 7,570 2,073 Pork livers, fresh or frozen 44 380 203 Corn, except seed 286 Seedcorn, except sweet seedcorn 10 20 65 Grain sorghums 2,785 Soybean oilcake and meal 1,815 3,467 1,182 Cattle hides, undressed - 495 31 Calf and kip skins, undressed 951 191 36 Sheep and lamb skins, undressed 131 236 1 Fur skins, undressed 16 Soybeans 996 Rubber, synthetic 35 131 22 Seeds for planting 35 1 Tallow, inedible 173 Coal tar and other cyclic intermediate acids 57 21 Coal tar and cyclic chemical intermediates, other 60 14 Herbicides 230 68 Acids and anhydrides 69 Organic chemicals, other 36 15 2 Carbon black 32 Potassium compounds 29 Pigments, paints, and related materials 34 83 24 Hormones, bulk 464 166 66 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products, other 25 47 Plastic materials 4 15 1 Chemicals, other 6 17 4 Leather 154 275 163 Fur skins, dressed 8 17 Paper and paperboard 144 250 23 Prefabricated and portable buildings of iron or steel 35 Power generating machinery, except electric 17 Agricultural machinery and implements 7 72 15 Electronic computers 135 139 Card punching and auxiliary machinery 47 261 3 Parts for electronic data processing machines 57 14 Parts for office machines, other 8 10 16 Milling machines, metalcutting 320 Textile machinery 8 83 3 Printing machines and parts 40 Power cranes, draglines, shovels, and parts, excavator type~_ 95 Refrigerating units, centrifugal 18 Oil and gas field equipment and parts 27 See footnotes at end of table. 11 PAGENO="0288" Commodity 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH HUNGARY-Continued Nonelectric machinery, other 102 61 3 Telecommunications apparatus 56 28 2 Nuclear radiation detecting and measuring instruments 44 144 5 Electric measuring and controifing instruments and apparatus, other 59 117 64 Electromedical apparatus and parts, except X-ray 23 44 16 Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other 23 29 12 Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and ap- paratus 89 192 25 Photographic and motion picture supplies 9 58 11 Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts 12 58 21 Printed matter 256 4 Works of art and collectors' items 4 18 Articles and manufactures of carving or molding materials 41 12 6 Manufactured goods, other 51 47 17 Other and unspecified domestic exports 20 30 7 Reexports of works of art and collectors' items 2 50 17 Reexports, other 2 6 4 2,985 3,884 1,080 720 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Imports, total Cheese Vegetables and preparations Paprika Food, other Alcoholic beverages Wild pig and hog skins Hides and skins, except fur skins, undressed, other Feathers and down, crude Plants and parts used in perfumery, pharmacy, or insacticides Inorganic chemicals Cinchona bark alkaloids and salts Nicotine and compounds Hormones, bulk Medicinal and pharmaceutical products, other Explosives and pyrotechnic products Chemicals, other Cotton fabrics, woven Fabrics of vegetable textile fibers, except cotton and jute Regalia for religious use Textile yarn, fabrics, and related products, other Glass Glassware Imitation gem stones, except beads Pottery Metal manufactures Metalworking machinery Printing presses, letter Electronic tubes, except X-ray and television picture tubes Machinery, other Motorcycles and parts Bicycles Bicycle parts Furniture Clothing, except of fur Fur clothing and fur articles Footwear Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and ap- paratus Developed motion picture film Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts Printed matter Toys and games Stamps Works of art and collectors' items, other Jewelry and wares of precious metals Baskets and bags of unspun vegetable materials Brooms and brushes Wigs and other human hair manufactures Manufactured goods, other Returned goods Other imports - See footnotes at end of table. 12 23 55 13 44 49 31 113 310 10 16 15 9 190 187 23 14 14 86 76 12 61 65 4 8 20 108 16 23 7 22 4 22 10 18 20 8 129 252 180 182 11 11 29 31 23 10 10 42 13 159 207 65 42 61 63 111 9 17 11 1 2 91 135 32 3 16 173 45 238 349 18 91 115 38 7 16 1 4 16 (1) 32 40 4 1 47 6 8 27 6 7 7 20 38 26 17 121 191 59 14 31 1 204 281 63 172 215 43 13 3 319 243 80 173 149 115 50 30 3 40 58 15 13 24 357 393 325 PAGENO="0289" 721 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Commodity 1966 1967 Ianuary- March 1968 TRADE WITH POLAND Exports, total 52, 988 60,827 21, 637 Nonfat dry milk 629 1, 692 449 Wheat 8, 925 13 1, 650 Rice 3,067 Barley 1,601 2,940 Corn, except seed 3, 105 10, 697 4,942 Grain sorghums 5, 380 3,809 Wheat flour4 2,067 851 381 Cornmeal 4 175 132 14 Lemons, fresh 423 Tea 162 74 Soybean oilcake and meal 3,079 4,665 1, 634 Linseed oilcake and meal 127 656 360 Lard and other prepared edible fats 120 377 Food, other 4 139 479 142 Tobacco, unmanufactured 338 304 Cigarettes 487 658 221 Tobacco manufactures, other 5 11 224 Cattle hides, undressed 4, 015 1, 721 786 Kip skins, undressed 84 106 24 Sheep and lamb skins, undressed 81 196 79 Peanuts, shelled, green 24 271 97 Soybeans 93 5, 318 3, 545 Flour and meal of oilseeds, oil nuts and kernels 212 184 Rubber, synthetic 1, 462 900 60 Cotton pulp 111 92 Cotton, raw, except linters 9, 206 5, 774 3,393 Wool rags and used clothing of wool 21 110 37 Seeds for planting 301 776 35 Petroleum products 6 82 3 Tallow, inedible 3, 151 2,080 611 Soybean oil, refined 2, 294 2,008 457 Coal tar and other cyclic intermediate acids 134 97 (1) Plasticizers, cyclic 1,402 Glycerine 363 Acids and anhydrides 1 131 Organic chemicals, other 73 471 94 Carbon black 250 233 9 Inorganic chemicals, other 74 246 132 Pigments, paints, and related materials 9 89 Hormones, bulk 328 941 Medicinal and pharmaceutical products, other4 161 138 62 Chemicals, other 166 218 43 Paper, paperboard, and manufactures 399 388 61 Rayon or acetate spun yarn 355 187 Yarn and thread of manmade fibers, other 122 Iron and steel 87 170 Cobalt, unwrought, waste and scrap 163 90 Power generating machinery, except electric 95 36 2 Tractors, tracklaying 128 Office machines and parts 139 52 2 Gearcutting machines, metalworking 247 Gas operated welding, cutting, and sinillar surface tempering appliances and parts 965 Metalworking machinery, other 162 282 37 Textile and leather machinery 218 25 1 Paper cutting and paper products manufacturing machinery 149 13 Food processing machines and parts 81 34 Boring and drilling machines, except well drilling 218 Well drilling machines, rotary type 272 95 Parts for well drilling machines 6 92 Glassworking machinery and parts 370 34 15 Machines for special industries and parts, other 85 84 Heating and cooling equipment 85 119 16 Tire recapping and repairing machines and parts 121 Metal treating and metal powder molding machines 147 93 Nonelectric machinery, other 244 181 75 Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus 168 191 207 Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other 236 175 28 Clothing, except of fur 647 534 93 See footnotes at end of table. 13 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 19 PAGENO="0290" Commodity ~ 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH POLAND-Continued Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and appa- ratus 195 416 lOfi Developed motion picture film 81 61 12 Printed matter 235 147 24 Manufactured goods, other 341 300 104 Unspecified commodities for relief 453 263 4 Other and unspecified domestic exports 95 163 54 Reexports 2 64 58 80 82, 948 90, 960 26, 009 722 Table 1.--United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Imports, total 1~orses, live Canned cooked hams and shoulders Pork, prepared or preserved, other Meat and preparations, other Cheese Eggs Cod blocks, frozen Fish and preparations, other Blueberries, except fresh Strawberries, frozen Chicory roots, crude Fruit and vegetables, other Sugar Molasses, inedible Caraway seed Fish and whale meal and scrap Food, other Alcoholic beverages Calf and kip skins, t~adressed Wild pig and hog skins, undressed Fox fur, except silver and black, undressed Mink fur, undressed Fur skins, undressed, other - Poppyseed Feathers and down, crude Bristles Crude materials, other Peat moss, fertilizer grade Drugs and medicinals derived from benzenoid chemicals and products~ - - Ethyl alcohol Trichloroethylene Organic chemicals, other Pigments containing chromium Inorganic chemicals, other Synthetic organic dyestufis and color lakes Antibiotics, bulk Casein - Gelatin, inedible, and animal glue Chemicals, other Calf and kin leather Wood ~nanufacture5 except furmture other Building board Cotton fabrics, woven Wool fabrics, woven Fabrics of vegetable textile fibers, except cotton and jute Textile fabrics, woven, other Textile yarn, fabrics, and related products, other Drawn or blown glass, unworked, in rectangles - Cast or rolled glass, unworked, in rectangles Glass, other Glassware Pottery Wire rod of iron or steel Bars and rods, except wire rod, of iron or steel Angles, shapes, and sections of iron or steel - Universals, plates, and sheets of iron or steel Tubes, pipes, and fittings of iron or steel Aluminum, unwrought, not alloyed Zinc, unwrought, not alloyed ~ ~ ~1t tilti t~ t~t1~1Q 14 73 178 27, 986 33,815 8,939 8, 197 9, 281 2, 750' 146 297 132 272 485 144 305 2, 754 2, 194 954. 69 108 353 118 25 392 302 133 234 114 32 124 22 255 242 80' 1,315 159 334 137 215 279 83- 171 184 46 182 219 77 92 125 23- 933 470 51 3, 181 2, 018 795 1,369 454 229 103 40 33- 282 313 70 648 713 293 108 59 15 168 112 56. 200 209 58 920 1,157 215 768 83 354 110. 193 115 3- 265 321 45 39 120 35- 148 219 55 1,066 761 413 2,416 1,922 500 158 152 51 61 117 19. 133 107 61 945 151 281 474 31 301 279 58 308 232 85 217 76 57 195 99 18 4,263 4,027 889 268 80 27 507 901 277 302 433 165 524 405 84 33 194 65 756 745 164 298 446 51 78 365 358. 3,705 4,929 1,724 202 630 22 1,991 3,840 615. 829 906 118 - 248 1,556 1,452 2,067 616 PAGENO="0291" 723 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of doliarsi Commodity 1966 1967 Yanuary- March 1968 161 1,233 1,033 722 177 104 864 151 98 165 131 258 5 59 563 200 514 864 157 76 586 158 121 212 1,367 195 369 ~ 218 21 16 335 117 243 51 89 19 9 16 38 2 19 176 102 134 194 21 192 10 26 119 287 29 55 ~ 55 Cadmium, unwrought, not alloyed 112 Barbedwire 69 Wire nails, 0065 inch or over in diameter, of iron or steel 683 Nails, screws, and similar articles of iron or steel, other 735 Handtools and tools for machines 605 Domestic utensils of base metals 82 Metal manufactures, other 73 Boring machines and lathes, metalworking 225 Metalworking machinery, other 162 Sewing machines and parts 118 Metalworking machine tool parts - 55 Machinery, other 138 Bicycles and parts 301 Transport equipment, other 121 Lighting fixtures and fittings - 109 Bentwood furniture and parts 629 Chairs of wood, other, including folding 548 Furniture and parts, other 425 Clothing, except of fur 360 Footwear 236 Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts 98 Glass Christmas tree ornaments 521 Toys, games, and sporting goods 209 Stamps 158 Brooms and brushes 151 Baskets, bags, and handbags of willow 1,237 Articles of plaiting materials, other 328 Manufactured goods, other 299 Other imports 3 262 TRADE WITH RUMANIA Exports, total Baby chicks Potatoes, fresh Cattle hides, undressed Calf and kip skins, undressed Soybeans Woodpulp Cotton, raw, except linters Florida phosphate hard rock and land pebble Crude materials, other Coal Benzene Rubber antioxidants, cyclic Herbicides Organic phosphate insecticides Glycerine Methyl ethyl ketone Organic chemicals, other Inorganic chemicals Antibiotics, bulk Blood derivatives for human use Vaccines, except poliomyelitis, serums, and antitoxins for human use Medicinal and pharmaceutical products, other Essential oils, perfume, and flavor materials Explosives and pyrotechnic products Plastic materials Herbicidal preparations Catalysts, compound Chemicals, other Paper and paperboard Oil pipe, seamless, carbon steel Oil pipe, seamless, alloy steel, except stainless Tubes, pipes, and fittings of iron or steel, other Finished structural parts and structures of iron or steel Drill and core bits, except percussion, and reamers Handtools and tools for machines, other Metal manufactures, other See footnotes at end of table. 15 27, 057 16, 796 80 134 5, 515 495 108 1, 878 43 383 12 921 56 41 41 44 59 62 24 96 1,305 84 380 633 287 395 36 70 3,870 150 124 1,603 3 1,688 654 302 36 25 131 277 144 476 249 1 41 88 11 9 40 56 39 139 40 58 48 61 26 98 111 88 1,062 87 2 74 1,431 653 367 5 467 19 102 7 68 32 PAGENO="0292" Commodity . 1966 19fi7 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH RUMANIA-Continued Steam generating power boilers and parts 113 761 286 Steam engines, turbines, and parts 28 86 Internal combustion engines, not for aircraft, and parts 86 16 2 Harvesters, field forage 201 Tractors, wheel and garden 46 Agricultural machinery and implements, other 52 41 6 Hydraulic and pneumatic presses, metalworking, new 83 59 Gasoperated welding, cutting, and similar machines and parts 499 Metalworking machinery, other 22 37 Textile and leather machinery - 131 10 ,35 Parts for printing machines 41 1 Flour mill and gristmill machines and parts 274 Food processing machines and parts, other 175 Power cranes, draglines, shovels, and parts, excavator type 569 76 Ditchers and trenchers, self-propelled 55 Well drilling machines and parts 260 103 24 Construction and mining machinery and parts, other 40 14 52 Machines and parts for treatment of food products involving a change in temperature 145 391 7 Material processing equipment and parts involving a change in tempera- ture, other 3, 183 61 32 Heating and cooling equipment, other 40 86 92 Pumps for liquids and parts 596 264 54 Gas compressors and parts 566 176 118 Pumps, centrifuges, and parts, other 600 150 Oil and gas field equipment and parts 441 221 1 Mechanical handling equipment, other 99 106 21 MotorizecLhandtools and parts, nonelectric 137 105 4 Ball and rollerbearings 41 28 12 Taps, cocks, valves, and similar appliances 894 132 5 Nonelectric machinery, other 284 70 98 Electric power machinery 295 48 1 Electric circuit apparatus 935 261 2 Insulated wire and cable and electric insulating equipment 268 37 2 Electronic navigational aids 61 145 23 Electronic search and detection apparatus, Including radar 93 X-ray apparatus and parts 37 Waveform measuring and analyzing instruments 296 1 Geophysical and mineral prospecting instruments 824 630 Physical properties testing and inspecting Instruments 87 90 Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus, other 411 402 34 Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other 43 144 42 Passenger cars 35 1 3 Trucks 59 Power cranes, draglines, and shovels, wheel or truck mounted 129 237 Trucks, with drilling equipment, new - 157 Special purpose nonmilitary vehicles, other 781) 68 Truck trailers and parts 49 Professional, scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and ap- paratus 389 342 76 Photographic prints 773 Printed matter, other 391 32 361 Manufactured goods, other 213 167 48 Other domestic exports 59 85 9 Reexports 2 40 86 4, 655 6, 176 1, 626 724 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968'-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Imports, total Cheese Walnuts, shelled Plums, prunes, and prunelles, dried Mushrooms, dried Paprika Coriander Pox fur, except silver and black, undressed Hare fur, undressed Poppyseed Iron and steel waste and scrap Feathers and down, crude Plants and parts used in perfumery, pharmacy, or insecticides Fuel oil, residual Xylene Silicofluoride See footnotea at end of table. 16 482 660 157 28 99 18 11 82 52 118 93 24 30 3 19 321 328 95 286 27 115 33 77. 9 12 513 517 37 12. PAGENO="0293" 725 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollars] TRADE WITH U.S.S.R. Exports, total - Cattle, beef, for breeding Cigarettes Cattle hides, undressed Calf and kip skins, undressed Sheep and lamb skins, undressed Woodpulp Manmade fiber staple and tow Petroleum coke Tallow, inedible Coal tar and other cyclic intermediates Rubber accelerators, cyclic Rubber antioxidants, cyclic Herbicides Chlorinated hydrocarbons Acids and anhydrides Alcohols and polyhydric alcohols Organic chemicals, other Aluminum oxide Oxides, hydroxides, and peroxides of strontium, barium, or magnesium - - Sodium carbonate, except natural Inorganic chemicals, other Pigments, paints, and related materials Medicinal and pharmaceutical products Plastic materials Agricultural insecticides Herbicidal preparations Collecting reagents for ores, metals, or minerals Chemicals, other Cattle hide and kip side leather Fur skins, dressed Textile yarn, fabrics, and related products Plates and sheets of iron or steel Tubes and pipes, seamless, carbon steel Finished structural parts and structures of iron or steel Metal manufacturers, other - Power generating machinery, except electric - Tracklaying tractors Agricultural machinery and implements, other Electronic computers and parts Office machines and parts, other External cylindrical grinding machines, metalcutting Gearcutting machines, metalcutting Tool and cutter grinding machines, metalcutting Honing and lapping machines, metalcutting Metalworking machinery, other See footnotes at end of table. 41,725 60,195 14,944 93 48 248 4 15,313 16,758 1,412 246 966 170 1,599 472 5,250 7,405 1,700 2,403 5,396 844 196 7,599 171 516 2 59 1,041 27 372 15 48 112 1,250 364 665 795 1,858 638 5,190 4,287 156 370 177 427 510 399 1 35 59 178 206 24 522 893 96 1,206 881 1,426 173 75 72 89 19 1,299 110 53 69 8 329 77 445 263 18 71 21 17 205 106 600 280 356 1 2 1,079 485 50 51 44 2l~ 937 1,535 180 93 221 564 58 Commodity 1966 January- 1967 March 1968 TRADE WITH RUMANIA-Continued Wood manufactures, except furniture Textile fabrics, woven, except cotton Made-up textile articles Carpets, carpeting, and rugs Drawn or blown glass, unworked, in rectangles Glassware Pig iron Knitting machines, circular, for hosiery Machinery, other Bentwood furniture and parts Chairs of wood, other, including folding Furniture, other Clothing, except of fur Footwear, leather Toys and games Stamps Baskets and bags of unspun vegetable materials Manufactured goods, other Returned goods Other imports 31 19 43 81 286 130 956 15 107 237 48 11 736 12 188 65 44 (1) 3 44 51 6 142 49 405 179 28 84 428 50 150 1, 698 23 229 61 61 215 ~64 14 25 80 33 57 18 28 9~ 6 752 14 10 15 31 ~28 17 PAGENO="0294" . Commodity 1966 * 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH U.S.S.R-Continued Machines for extruding manmade textile filaments, or for producing tow - 253 692 453 Laundry and dry cleaning equipment, commercial, and parts 129 197 23 Textile and leather machinery, other 176 530 156 Printing and bookbinding machinery and parts 57 263 148 Food processing machinery and parts, except domestic 377 52 Parts for construction and mining machinery 157 414 101 Construction and mining machinery, other 61 144 Mineral crushing, sorting, and similar machinery and parts 107 110 331 Metal processing and heat treating furnaces 127 Heating and cooling equipment for treatment of food products 233 11 3 Heating and cooling equipment, other_ 54 93 2 Pumps and centrifuges and parts 398 74 3 Underground mine loaders and parts - 48 98 49 Conveying equipment and parts 335 178 Mechanical handling equipment, other 51 78 Parts for metalworking machinery 100 9 Wrapping, packaging, ifiling, and similar machines and parts 127. 38 9 Plasticsworking machines and parts 1 74 Rubber processing and products manufacturing machines and parts 420 Mechanical power transmission equipment and parts, except for motor vehicles and aircraft 52 6 5 Nonelectric machinery, other 156 234 278 Electric power machinery and switchgear 45 151 4 Telecommunications apparatus 244 33 24 Electron tubes and solid state semiconductors and parts 7 57 4 Physical properties testing and inspecting instruments 24 644 Electric measuring and controlling instruments and apparatus, other 92 619 77 Electric machinery, apparatus, and appliances, other 32 83 Parts for motor vehicles and tractors 157 595 122 Transport equipment, other 7 58 3 Clothing, except of fur 47 53 10 Precision measuring tools for machinists 99 Professional,. scientific, measuring, and controlling instruments and appa- ratus, other 91 142 38 Developed motion pictisre film 57 13 36 Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts 28 38 72 Printed matter 61 59 13 Construction plastic products 533 Articles of plastic materials, other 2 , 134 8 Manufactured goods, other 140 162 47 Live animals, not for food 194 179 Other domestic exports 25 `38 12 Reexports 2 57 32 3 Imports, total See footnotes at end of table. 49,414 41,044 20,745 726 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-Continued [Thousands of dollarsi Lobster, fresh and simply preserved 92 91 Shrimp, unshelled 487 658 Fish and preparations, other 66 61 3 Mushrooms, dried or preserved 65 3 Alcoholic beverages 33 52 12 Persian lamb and earacul fur, undressed 1, 975 1, 162 396 Sable fur, undressed 2,517 2,427 386 Squirrel fur, undressed 1, 264 * 307 18 Fur skins, undressed, other 546 294 42 Wool and other animal hair 94 55 15 Cotton linters 1, 150 726 277 Cotton waste 161 5 Manmade fiber waste 113 130 36 Chrome ore 6,323 6, 785 1, 727 Aluminum waste and scrap 473 Ash and residues bearing nonferrous metals 266 914 457 Bristles 793 820 15 Sausage casings 112 175 Licorice root 564 588 302 Whale oil, sperm, crude 461 Cottonseed oil 1,523 Pyridine 98 Arsenic trioxide 149 4 Chromium oxide green Sodium chromate and dichromate 725 430 286 Inorganic chemicals, other 348 243 19 18 PAGENO="0295" 727 Table 1.-United States Trade With Principal Countries of Eastern Europe, 1966, 1967, and January-March 1968-~--Continued [Thousands of dollars] Commodity 1966 1967 January- March 1968 TRADE WITH U.S.S.R-Continued Radioactive and stable isotopes and compounds Essential oils, perfume, and flavor materials Wood manufactures, except furniture Drawn or blown glass, unworked, in rectangles Diamonds, cut but unset Emeralds, cut but unset Precious and semiprecious stones, natural, unset, except diamonds Pig iron Ferrochromium, ferrotitanium, and ferrovanadium Platinum Palladium Rhodium Nickel Magnesium Molybdenum waste and scrap Titanium Metal manufactures Milling machines, metalworking Printed matter Stamps Works of art and collectors' items, other Manufactured goods, other Returned goods Other imports 22 147 9 931 3,425 109 7 5, 567 35 1, 720 13, 920 3,408 241 353 447 45 125 101 144 152 6 3 198 45 160 45 1, 050 6,337 189 263 43 586 7, 019 3, 120 619 832 1,514 14 97 200 232 50 198 117 3 157 1 19 77 189 3, 506 2 276 9, 219 1,818 563 550 16 11 87 317 63 3 36 1 less than $500. 2 Merchandise of foreign origin which entered the United States as imports, and which, at the time of export, were in substantially the same condition as when imported. 3 Includes an estimate of low-value shipments of $250 or less each on informal entry shipments and under $100 each on formal entry shipments. 4 Includes relief shipments. 19 PAGENO="0296" 728 Export Licensing to Eastern E~rope Commodity Applications Approved License applications for commodities valued at $44.1 million were approved for -export to Eastern Europe during the second quarter 1968. Principal destinations were the U.S.S.R., $25.3 million, and East Germany, $10.7 million. This second quarter total compares with $37.2 million approved in the previous quarter and $24.5 million approved in the second quarter 1967. Industrial machinery accounted for $17 million of the total value approved. The passenger automobile plant being built by FIAT in the U.S.S.R. was the destination for $15.6 million of these goods, including gear manufacturing and testing machines, $9.2 million; molding and casting line foundry equipment, $2.9 million; and crankshaft grinding machinery, $2.3 million. Agricultural commodities valued at $8.4 million were licensed for export, almost entirely to East Germany. Principal commodities were yellow corn, $4.6 million, and grain sorghums, $3.4 million. Chemical products worth $7.4 million were approved for export to Eastern Europe. The U.S.S.R. was the destination for $5 million of these, including agricultural insecticides worth $1.4 million. Exports of various scientific and electronic instruments valued at $3.6 million were licensed, including a particle accelerator and acces- sories worth $1.7 million for Rumania. Other significant approvals were alumina, $3 million, for the U.S.S.R.; and electronic computers, data processing machines, and peripherals, tot~iling $2.4 mifiion, for various. Eastern European countries.~ - - - - - Temporary Exports In addition to the above, the Department approved applications for the temporary export of commodities valued at $3.2 million for purposes of exhibition, demonstration, or testing in Eastern European countries. The principal destinations were the U.S.S.R~, $986,769, and Bulgaria, $840,000. At the conclusion of the exhibition, demonstration, or test in Eastern Europe, these commodities must be returned to the United States or other country from which they were shipped, unless prior written authorization for other disposition has been obtained from the Department. Commodity Applications Rejected During the second quarter 1968 license applications for commodities valued at $5 million were rejected for export to Eastern European destinations. Rejections included well-logging equipment valued at $2,578,677; industrial machinery, $472,479; glycerine, $892,500; and cameras for the manufacture of masks for semiconductors, $330,735. 20 - PAGENO="0297" 0 - _) ~ 0 ~ w~r I~" ~rJ~rJ ~ ~ ~ ~ (D~. ~ o~r~- o~-~ o~- o~- o~-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~0rh ~~orI~ ~ ~ ~ ~0~0~* 0~0 0 1111 110 110 110 110 110 110 `C li ~ ~.1 .~. ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~J `1 0' ~ 03 ~ 0' 030'O 0'0'0' 0' 0303 030 03 03 ~ 030 ~ 0-4 3-' 3C340~ ~ PAGENO="0298" 730 Table 3.-Commodities Licensed for Export to Eastern European Destinations in the Second Quarter 1968' Country and commodity Value in dollars Country and commodity Value in dollars Albania: Steam generator Bulgaria: Propyl alcohol Epichlorohydrin Herbicides Polyvinyl pyrrolidone Diagnostic laboratory reagents. -- Synthetic resins Monoethanolamine Surface active agents Other industrial chemicals Chemical products and prepara- tions Organic flocculating agents Tomato harvester with spare parts. Scales for weighing grain Diesel engines with piping and accessories Physical properties testing equip- ment Statistical machines Waveform analyzing and testing instruments Photocopying machines Chemical analysis equipment Electronic computer parts and accessories Automotive replacement parts - - - Electrical and electronic testing equipment and accessories Electronic navigation aids: instru- ment landing system, beacons, and other accessories Total - Czechoslovakia: Corn, milled Rice Synthetic rubber - Molybdenum concentrates - Tungsten concentrates - Herbicides - Insecticides and fungicides Glycols - Rubber compounding chemicals. - Prepared rubber accelerators Methylene chloride Resins - Intermediate chemicals - Calcium hypochlorite Polyethylene (synthetic resin)_ - - - Silicone fluids Chloro-nitroaniline (industrial chemicals) Polyethyleneimine solution Glycosides and their derivatives. - Flocculating agents Surface active agents Laboratory chemicals Other industrial chemicals Firebricks and shapes Aluminum oxide tubing Flexible metal hose Tire building machines and parts. Petroleum products Physical properties testing equip- ment Slurry pumps Photocopying machines Instruments for measuring or con- trolling the flow and level of liquids or gases Sporting-type parachute See footnote at end of table. Czechoslovakia-Con. Electronic computers, parts, and peripherals Current carrying devices Construction machines and equip- ment: tractors, excavators, rip- pers, etc Hot box detection system with related spares and components. - Instruments for measuring elec- trical or electronic quantities_ -- - Bacteria mycobacterium abseces- sus Automatic typewriters Chemical analysis equipment Magnetic computer tape units with accessories Scientific and professional equip- ment Platinum wire Optical measuring instruments...... - Still and motion picture film Flame detectors and accessories. - - Aluminum flakes Resistors Industrial machine parts Automotive replacement parts. - - - Total East Germany: Yellow corn Grain sorghums Cotton linters Synthetic rubber Vir gin mercury Epichiorohydrin (industrial chem- ical) Expandable polystyrene Synthetic resin sheeting poromeric material Bismuth metal Orthoxylol (industrial chemical) - Allyl chloride (industrial chemi- cal) Cyclic chemical products Culture media Reagents Rubber compounding chemicals. - Other industrial chemicals - Glass and polyethylene vials Non-clay ramming mix - Brass tube fittings - Antivolution burners with attach- ments - Instruments for measuring, check- ing, or controlling variables of liquids or gases Instruments for indicating, meas- uring, or testing nonelectrical quantities Agricultural machinery - Ice rink surfacer Mercury vapor lamps Electronic computers, parts, and peripherals Statistical machine parts Pneumatic target flow transmit- ters Optical elements, unmounted Photocopying equipment Accessories for elemental analyzer Transmissions, shafts, cranks, bearings, etc Industrial laboratory equipment: electron microprohe spectrom- eters and accessories Gas and air So-scopes All Eastern European countries 44, 107,985 1,351 6,810 30, 600 12,381 68, 000 527 13, 777 43, 800 15, 663 9, 300 142 44, 000 32, 350 19, 635 235, 184 11,231 29, 372 6, 696 1, 705 2, 750 10, 000 2, 000 29, 434 268, 000 894, 157 5, 242 33, 000 55, 665 90, 995 275, 992 306, 262 195 127, 594 1,415 11,334 27, 125 42,448 63, 000 8, 616 114,900 15,865 19,575 8, 000 2, 756 20, 000 15,800 1, 086 16, 050 1,125 800 16 44, 250 51 5, 180 15,512 21, 102 1,861 244 244, 666 6,856 196, 019 18,475 4, 867 25 33, 670 22,481 56, 189 69, 449 2, 362 1,786 4. 115 16, 929 160 4, 609 4, 855 2, 000 2,042,572 4, 609, 426 3,433, 242 346, 565 98, 658 288, 000 77, 000 171,256 90, 200 17,680 560, 000 23,357 205 650 3, 302 3, 006 2,447 764 3, 233 38 15, 389 33,104 3, 250 29, 336 15, 000 236 386, 598 40, 000 1,630 11,550 985 2, 630 70,000 235, 782 4,386 22 PAGENO="0299" East Germany-Con. Electrical switchesand relays - Vibrating electrometer Liquid spectrometer systems and accessories - Miscellaneous industrial parts and accessories - Total - Hungary: Synthetic rubber Petroleum lubricating grease Chemical intermediates Herbicides and insecticides Industrial chemicals Acetal resins Surface active agents Synthetic resin Cholera vaccine Diagnostic and chemical reagents- Ion exchange resins Refractory cement Printing plates Cryogenic refrigerators Air conditioners Relays, motor parts, switches, and resistors Potentiometric strip chart re- corder Quartz crystals Pneumatic temperature transmit- ter parts Chemical analysis equipment Honing machine parts Vapor pressure osmometer and parts Magnetometer system Electromagnet system Electron gun mounts and replace- ment lamps Photomultiplier tubes Statistical machines Multitype typewriter and parts - - Electronic computer system Electronic computer parts Magnetic computer tape Strain gauges Electronic components and parts-- Spectrofluorometer and parts Amplifier and transformer Laboratory and scientific instru- ments Cathode ray oscilloscopes Tire recapping machines Nonmilitary tracklaying tractor parts Automotive replacement parts - - Communications antenna Bacteria Miscellaneous commodities Total 938,812 Poland: Molybdenum concentrates 1,000 Aluminum borate 80 Flocculating agents 9, 720 Fuel and diesel oil 16, 485 Chemical reagents 47 Cobalt metal 81, 020 Monocrystalline germanium 1,093 Beryllium copper rods and wire - - 1,043 Computer parts 158,957 Cryogenic equipment parts 2,975 Electronic components 2,703 Centrifugal extractors 215, 600 Oil well testing tools and parts - - - 75, 000 See footnote at end of table. Value in dollars Poland-Con. Welding machine discs 246 Backing assemblies for cold strip mill 317,176 Diaphragm control valves 804 Airborne indicator 971 Photomultiplier tubes 650 Electron tubes and diodes 1, 104 Galvanizing line parts 9,906 Seismic field systems and parts~. 126,000 Seismic magnetic recorders and tape 95,000 Slotted line electronic measuring instrument Capacitors and quartz crystals - - - 88 Digital phase meter 2, 610 Signal generators and parts 2,960 Oscilloscope 3, 159 Nonmilitary tracklaying tractor parts 25,000 Computer tape transports 35,921 Magnetic computer tape 115 Electric motors and parts 454 Chemical analysis equipment 2, 120 Total 1,190,756 Rumania: Hydraulic fluid 3,270 Flotation promoter 121 Monochlorodifluoromethane 55 Lithium bromide 3,060 Epoxy powder 3,909 Flocculating agents 11,010 Silica alumina catalyst 21, 594 Cold drawn seamless pipe 4, 314 Automatic typewriters 27, 400 Petroleum field production equip- ment ~, 730 Heat exchangers 21, 645 Rotary rock drill bits 14, 834 Rotary drill rig parts 117, 258 Glass pressing machines 136, 531 Check valve 2, 123 Electronic test instruments 632 Well-logging instruments and parts 113, 511 Transistors, rectifiers, and photo- cells 83 Proton magnetometer and parts~ 14, 890 Chemical analysis equipment - - - - 11, 250 Particle accelerator with ion beam analyzing system and parts 1, 745, 200 Electronic data processing system 826, 965 Directional gyros 8, 240 Seismograph equipment parts 22, 760 Total 3,114,385 U.S.S.R.: Gift parcels 314 Synthetic rubber 1, 536 Chemical cotton acetate pulp 8, 872 Marine diesel fuel oil 15, 510 Lubricating oils and greases 14, 926 Glycols 106,902 Channel carbon black 6, 240 Acrylonitrile (industrial chemical) 569, 500 Antioxidants 349, 190 Alumina 2, 979, 070 Methyl bromide (industrial chem- ical) 240,000 Epidhlorohydrin (industrial chem- ical) 478,000 Industrial solvent 90, 168 Intermediate chemicals 9, 585 Other industrial chemicals 17,361 Defoliant for cotton plants 841, 477 Agricultural insecticides I 1, 434, 880 731 Table 3.-Commodities Licensed for Export to Eastern European Destinations in the Second Quarter 1968 -Continued Country and commodity Value in dollars Country and commodity 9, 659 2, 505 70, 168 1, 180 10,662,417 813 2, 043 117, 499 5, 922 38, 627 07, 640 76, 173 53, 391 10 2, 655 108 3, 036 26, 373 7, 500 538 3, 903 1,005 120 464 8, 401 780 3, 700 15,346 19, 773 450 446 100, 650 4,525 79, 000 212, 368 3, 488 780 7, 245 5, 625 434 6, 124 18, 120 3,782 3, 000 2,000 2,250 75 2, 540 23 PAGENO="0300" 732 Table 3.-Commo4ities Licensed for Export to Eastern European Destinations in the Second Quarter 1966 -Continued Country and commodity Value in dollars Country and commodity Value in dollars U.S.S.R-Continued Herbicides Weed-killer Polyisobutylene Miscellaneous chemical samples - - Laboratory chemicals Synthetic, epoxy, and thermoset- ting resins Polyvinyl butyral resin powder - - Nickel cobalt alloy catalyst Flocculating agents Coated abrasive paper Molding and casting line foundry equipment Grinding machines and parts Metalworking presses Surface broaching machines Automatic typewriters Statistical machines Data phones, converters, and high speed tape receiver and sender sets Preformed copper tubing Hand polishing stones Waterproof cloth Tubeless nylon tires Automotive parts Glassworking machinery Ball and roller bearings Power transmission equipment parts Off highway truck and trailer parts Sewing machine with parts Gear reduction units Temperature and pressure re- corders and parts Vibrator conveyor and parts 3,904 96,450 38.5, 995 3, 105 31,855 123, 428 151, 020 35, 000 52 417,000 2, 911, 311 2,278, 102 575, 787 622, 659 140, 155 11, 200 3, 121 490 936 46, 922 2,440 228 14, 760 6, 110 7,048 20, 000 14,853 3, 750 74, 786 15, 197 U.S.S.R-Continued Gear manufacturing and testing machines Rubber processing machines and parts . Recorder with parts and acces- sories Pbotomultiplier tubes Motors and switches Electronic dynalogs Motor control centers Air conditioning compressors Diffractometer and parts Liquid scintillation spectrometer system with accessories Laboratory instruments Spectrometer system with parts and accessories Spectrophotometers and parts Electrical test instruments Electronic computers Electronic computer parts Stroboscopes Pneumatic speed transmitters Chemical analysis equipment Motion picture film Scientific and professional in- struments Optical elements Optical printer camera Microfilming equipment Still picture equipment Fiber classifier Relative humidity indicator Bacteria Total 9, 158, 938 34,339 2, 784 1, 102 44,037 6,347 29, 888 1,850 91, 010 16, 994 109, 201 62, 652 88, 159 31, 682 246, 000 99, 931 6,040 10,268 22, 176 7,052 19, 147 421 9,560 300 116 2,310 11 25 25, 263,535 I Prior to the second quarter 1967, commodities licensed for temporary export, such as for demonstration at a trade fair, were included in this table. Beginning with the second quarter 1967, commodities licensed for temporary export are excluded from this table and are included in table 4. 24 PAGENO="0301" All Eastern European countries - 3, 166,371 Albania: Nil Bulgaria: Parts and accessories for construc- tion equipment Czechoslovakia: Electrical and scientific testing instruments, parts, and acces- sories Twin exchangeable disc store Automatic typewriter with ac- cessories Motion picture film and projector~ Nonmilitary integral tractor shovel-loader Counter top displays with medical transparencies Dental chair parts Single punch press for manufac- ture and assembly of electronic components Electronic computers with parts and accessories Scientific and professional in- struments Chemical analysis equipment Spectrometer system with parts and accessories Quartz thermometer Figurematic calculator Electrical testing instruments and parts Programmer, pressure osmometer, and other testing equipment - - - - Diffusion pump and accessories~ -- Moisture and density measuring instruments Signal generators Total East Germany: Chemical analysis equipment Parts and accessories for electronic computers and peripherals Total Hungary: Photocopying equipment Cryogenic refrigerator Unexposed motion picture fi1m~ Statistical machine Liquid scintillation system Construction equipment Spectrophotometer with parts and accessories Elemental analyzer with parts and accessories - Electronic computers, parts, and peripherals Electrical testing Instruments and parts Flow cells and adaptor Overhead projectors - Scientific and professional equip- ment - Total - Poland: Gas and liquid chromatographs~ - - Photometer - Airborne radio, speaker, and mi- crophone - Statistical machines - Liquid scintillation spectrometers and accessories - Magnetic recorder/reproducers~~. - - Flow cells and adaptor - Electrical testing equipment and accessories - Parts and accessories for electronic computers and peripherals - Industrial process instrumenL -- - - Recording spectrophotometer~ - - - Total Rumania: Electrical and scientific testing instruments with parts and accessories Electronic computer parts Total U.S.S.R.: Electrical testing instruments Spectrometer with parts and ac- cessories Spectrophotometer with parts and accessories Chemical analysis equipment Mounted optical elements Laboratory instruments for physi- cal or chemical analysis Steam generating boilers and parts Statistical machines - Electronic computers with parts and peripherals Motion picture equipment Total 733 Table 4.-Commodities Licensed for Temporary Export to Eastern European Destinations in the Second Quarter 1968' Country and commodity Value in dollars Country and commodity Value in dollars 840,000 88, 647 26, 400 4, 680 179 33,000 3, 000 171 5, 747 119, 937 34, 619 20, 529 33,868 3, 250 1, 146 11,369 11,550 1,265 18, 545 2, 165 420,067 71,815 45,801 117,616 4, 070 215 4,158 7,200 17,615 60,449 8,151 7,930 139,223 3,045 318 522 136,397 389,293 65,392 11,403 975 7, 200 33,783 14,450 318 91,692 45,801 3,300 13, 600 287,914 91, 692 33,020 124,712 3,940 308,835 179,938 224, 116 95 163,804 3,988 2, 500 99,324 179 986, 769 1 Prior to the second quarter 1967; commodities licensed for temporary export, such as for demonstration at a trade fair, were included in table 3. 25 PAGENO="0302" 734 Technical Data Applications During the second quarter 1968 the Department approved 26 applications for the export or reexport of unpublished and unclassi- fled technical data to Eastern European destinations. This compares with 19 applications approved in the previous quarter and 44 approved in the second quarter 1967. The decrease in the number of technical data applications processed largely results from the use of General License GTDU, rather than validated export licenses, to export limited technical data in support of a bid, quotation, or offer to these countries. (See 83d Quarterly Report for details concerning this revision of General License GTDU.) Eastern European countries continued to show strong interest in the acquisition of technical data relating to petroleum refining, chemi- cals and petrochemicals, metalworking processes, and electrothè in- struments and components. U.S. firms continued to seek the De- partment's advice concerning the furnishing by their foreign licensees, affiliates, and subsidiaries of technical data and equipment for the construction of production facilities in Eastern Europe. Exports of technical data relating to the commodities and processes indicated for each of the following countries were approved during the second~quarter: Bulgaria: Carbon disulfide furnace. Czechoslovakia: Phosphoric acid; sodium tripolyphosphate; pelletizing iron ore stocks; ethylene; oil film bearings; automotive steering gear mechanisms. East Germany: Toluene diisocyanate; air heaters. Poland: Ethylene; polyvinyl chloride; toluene diisocyanate. Rumania: Rotary drilling hose; desk top calculators; five-stand tandem cold strip and sheet mill; continuous steel strip and sheet pickling line; cold strip temper mill; air heaters; petroleum refining. U.S.S.R.: Automotive shock absorbers; flume stabilization systems; automobile engine exhaust poppet valves; television picture tube shadow masks; heat ex- changers; acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resins. After careful evaluation, the Department concluded that these technical data exports would not contribute significantly to Eastern Europe's military or economic potential in a way that would be detrimental to the national security and welfare of the United States. No applications for the export of technical data to Eastern Europe were rejected during the second quarter 1968. Foreign Filing of Patent Applications U.S. firms were granted 320 licenses for the export of technical data to permit the filing of foreign patent applications with the countries of Eastern Europe during the second quarter 1968. This compares with 327 such licenses issued in the previous quarter and 280 granted in the second quarter 1967. 26 PAGENO="0303" 735 Revision of Technical Data Export Regulations On May 10, 1968, the Department announced that, effective June 10, 1968, the written assurance provisions of General License GTDU would apply to technical data relating to wind tunnels and other devices for simulating environments at Mach 0.8 and above. (See Current Export Bulletin No. 965.) These provisions require an ex- porter to obtain from the foreign importer written assurance that neither the technical data nor the direct product thereof is intended to be shipped, either directly or indirectly, to a destination in Country Group W, Y, or Revision of Licensing Requirements for Eastern Europe On May 10J16& the Department announced a new procedure for licensifi~~xports and reexports of samples of certain types of commod- ities to Eastern Europe. Usually, a firm exporting samples expects to receive an order for a commercial quantity of the commodity at some future date. Therefore, in considering a license application to export samples, the Department also determines whether a commercial quantity of the commodity might be approved for the same destina- tion. In most cases, this deliberation is necessarily time-consuming. Under the new procedure, an exporter may request that his export license application for samples be acted on without any advance de- termination as to whether a commercial quantity might also be ap- proved. Such applications can be handled more expeditiously. (See Current Export Bulletin No. 965.) The procedure is limited to samples of the following types of com- modities: (1) chemicals, drugs, and pharmaceuticals; (2) synthetic rubber; (3) petroleum and petroleum products; (4) lubricants, addi- tives, and operational fluids; and (5) metals and minerals. Samples must be sent in accordance with usual business practices. Further, they must be sent either without charge or at no more than the usual charge. In no case may the value of a sample exceed $200. This procedure does not apply to samples of the strategic commodi- ties identified by the symbol "A" on the Commodity Control List.4 Nor does it apply to samples that contain or incorporate unique or advanced extractable technology that would make a significant con- tribution to the military or economic potential of the destination country to the detriment of the national security and welfare of the United States. Any license or authorization issued under this procedure carries a notice that the Department is in no way committed to approve ship- ment of a commercial quantity of the sample commodity. This notice 3 See P. 2 for an explanation of country grou PS. Comprehensive Export Schedule, § 399.1. 27 PAGENO="0304" 736 further cautions exporters to include in any sales contracts for such commodities a provision relieving themselves of liability in the event a commercial quantity is not approved by the Department. This new procedure has already proven beneficial in saving time and expense for American exporters and the Department. Export Licensing to Communist Areas in Asia During the second quarter 1968 the Department approved three license applications for exports to diplomatic missions of friendly foreign countries located in Communist China. The commodities approved were four air c~nditioners, two household refrigerators, and a gas range.5 Export Licensing to Cuba The Department approved exports worth $42,929 to Cuba during the second quarter 1968. These exports included bulk gift parcel ship- ments, totaling $41,866, and medicine valued at $3. Two air condi- tioners worth $700 and a household food freezer valued at $360 were consigned to diplomatic missions of friendly foreign countries located in Cuba. 5 Dollar values for these commodities were not available. 28 PAGENO="0305" 737 III Special Foreign Policy Export Controls Licensing Policy Toward Southern Rhodesia During the second quarter 1968 the Department continued to con- trol exports to ~Southern Rhodesia in conformity with U.S. foreign policy supporting the U.N. Security Council resolutions of 1965 and 1966. These controls required validated export licenses for virtually all commodity exports to Southern Rhodesia, except those serving humanitarian needs. Each license application was reviewed on its merits, with commodities important to the Southern Rhodesian econ- omy, as well as those for which selective mandatory economic sanc- tions had been imposed, generally being denied. (See the 83d Quarterly Report for a fuller discussion of these controls.) On May 29, 1968, the U.N. Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution No. 253, calling upon member states to impose virtually a total embargo on all trade with Southern Rhodesia. Exceptions under this resolution are limited to commodities specifically intended for particular medical, humanitarian, or educational uses. Pursuant to this action, on July 16, 1968, the Department issued a general order revoking all validated licenses and certain general licenses for exports to Southern Rhodesia. Effective immediately, the order (a) revoked all outstanding validated export licenses for commodities or technical data; (b) revoked General Licenses GIT, GLV, GTF, GLR, GATS, GLC, GMS, and GTDU;' (c) restricted use of General Licenses BAGGAGE and TOOLS OF TRADE to only those commodities identified by the symbol "B" on the Commodity Control List;2 and (d) restricted exports under General License G-DEST to dnly documentary motion picture film and certain pub- lished printed matter. (See Current Export Bulletin No. 968.) A saving clause in the order permitted shipments that were in transit to or at a port of exit prior to July 16, 1968, to be exported to Southern Rhodesia if laden aboard the exporting carrier before August 6, 1968. The order also set forth a new licensing policy toward Southern I 5ee Comprehensive Export Schedale, Parts 371 and 3S5, for the provisions of these and other general licenses. 2 comprehensive Export Schedule, § 399.1. 29 97-627 0 - 68 - pt. 2 - 20 PAGENO="0306" 738 Rhodesia. The Department will generally deny any license applica- tion, unless the export consists of foodstuffs required in special humani- tarian circumstances or is intended strictly for medical purposes, for educational institutions, or for essential needs of recognized charitable institutions. Antiboycott Regulations It is the policy of the United States to oppose restrictive trade practices or boycotts fostered by any foreign country against a country friendly to the United States and to encourage American exporters to refuse to cooperate in such a restrictive trade practice or boycott.3 U.S. exporters are required to report requests made of them to take any action, or furnish any information having the effect of furthering or supporting such a practice.4 During the second quarter 1968 U.S. firms reported 1,540 transa~- tions in which their cooperation in restrictive trade practices had been requested by various countries. From October 7, 1965, when the reporting requirement became effective, to the end of the second quarter 1968, the Department had received reports covering a total of 17,341 transactions. 3 Sec. 2(4) of the Export Control Act of 1949, as extended and amended by Public Law 89-63, 89th Congress. (See appendix of this report.) 4 See Comprehensive Export Schedule, Part 369, for details of this reporting requirement. 30 PAGENO="0307" 739 Iv Short Supply Export Controls The Department of Commerce maintains continuing surveillance over the supply-demand situation of all commodities "to protect the domestic economy from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the inflationary impact of abnormal foreign demand." Copper was the only commodity category subject to short supply controls during the second quarter 1968. At the same time, the De- partment continued to monitor exports of nickel and of softwood logs. Copper and Copper Products As reported in the 83d Quarterly Report, short sup ply controls over the export of copper and copper products were extended into 1968. Export licensing quotas for the first 6 months of 1968 were announced in January. These quotas continued the level of control in effect since January 1966. The following table shows the licensing quotas for the first half of 1968 and the amounts licensed during each quarter: Copper and copper products (copper content in short tons) Quotas, Jan. 1- June 30, 1968 Amounts licensed Jan. 1- Apr. 1- Mar. 31, 1968 June 30, 1968 Refined copper of U.S. origin Copper scrap and copper alloy scrap. Copper base alloy ingots Semifabricated copper products and master alloys of copper - 25,000 16,500 1,000 9,000 303 11,721 524 3, 783 11,468 3,653 473 4, 765 With the end of strikes in the copper smelting and refining industry, the Department announced that, effective April 15, 1968, it was rescinding the temporary procedures for ex-quota licensing of unrefined copper and copper-bearing scrap. (See Current Export Bulletin No. 964.) These special procedures were instituted in August and December 1967, respectively, to enable copper producers and secondary materials dealers not involved in the strikes to market their inventories. (See the 81st and 82d Quarterly Reports.) Under these procedures export licenses were issued for a total of 93,329 short tons (copper content) 31 PAGENO="0308" 740 of unrefined copper and 14,179 short tons (copper content) of copper- bearing scrap. Of these totals, 3,456 tons of unrefined copper and 2,557 tons of copper-bearing scrap were licensed in the second quarter 1968. In June 1968 the Department decided to continue short supply controls over the export of copper and related products, and on June 25, 1968, new export licensing quotas for the second half of 1968 were announced. (See Current Export Bulletin No. 965A.) The new quotas for refined copper and for semifabricated copper products and master alloys of copper are the same as those in effect during the first half of 1968; the new quotas for copper scrap and copper-base alloy ingots are approximately 50 percent higher. These export licensing quotas for the 6-month period July-December 1968 are as follows: Quota (copper content commodity in short tons) Refined copper of IJ.S. origin 25, 000 Copper scrap and copper alloy scrap 25, 000 Copper base alloy ingots 1, 500 Semifabricated copper products and master alloys of copper 9, 000 Review of the copper supply situation will continue and adjust- ments in these short supply controls will be made as required. Nickel and Nickel Allo?Js and Scrap During the second qu arter 1968 a close watch was maintained over the nickel supply-demand situation. The special licensing rules adopted in July 1967 (see the 80th Quarterly Report) enabled licenses issued as well as quantities actually exported to be monitored closely. By the end of the quarter there was evidence of some improvement in the supply of nickel scrap. The Department will continue to monitor the supply of nickel closely. Softwood Logs The Department continued its close surveillance of exports of soft- wood logs from the Pacific Northwest. As reported in the 83d Quarterly Report, various efforts were undertaken, in cooperation with other government agencies and the forest products industries, to achieve a better balance between exports of logs and of processed wood. A careful review of this situation led to the conclusion that export licensing quotas were still not appropriate. However, this matter will be kept under close scrutiny. 32 PAGENO="0309" 741 V Export Control Enforcement Activities During the second quarter 1968 the Departm~I~t~_Qffice~ of Export Cc~ptrol had 227 ~ under consideration for administrative or criminal proceedings, or b~t1~Of these, f76 cases we~~èiidih~'at the close ~ pF~~~fii~Fter and 51 new cases were opened during the second quarter. At the end of the quarter 57 cases had been closed, 22 on the basis of a determination of no violation or insufficient evidence, 29 after warnings to the parties involved for various types of violations considered not serious enough to warrant institution of formal charges or compliance proceedings, and six after completion of compliance proceedings. Ten other cases were referred to the Department's Office of General Counsel for the institution of administrative and/or criminal actions. The remaining 160 cases were still under active investigation at the close of the quarter. In addition, 136 preliminary inquiries were conducted to detect possible violations of the export control regulations. In 23 instances further investigation was not warranted. In six other instances sufficient informatioii was developed to justify full field investigation. The remaining 107 inquiries were still active at the end of the quarter. During the second quarter 1968 the Department issued a total of 46 warning letters, and 170 export license applications were specially reviewed to determine if irregularities were involved. Also, the De- partment initiated 86 prelicensing and 89 postshipment checks. The District Directors of Customs reported seizures during the second quarter of 44 shipments having a total appraised value of $94,505. Denial Orders Issued Pursuant to regulations governing administrative enforcement proceedings, the Department issued the following orders during the second quarter 1968: Waldamar Seitz Nema Meet- En Regeltechniek (also known as Nema Kantoren) Amsterdam, The Netherlands 33 PAGENO="0310" 742 On April 2, 1968, an order was entered denying these respondents all U.S. export privileges for the duration of export controls It was determined that~Th~ resiiondents had been dealing in U.S.-origin commodities in violation of the provisions of an outstanding indefinite denial order. The indefinite order was issued against the respondents (and Ute Hilma Seitz, wife of Waldamar Seitz) on March 14, 1966, for failure to furnish responsive answers to interrogatories served on them in the course of an official investigation into the disposition of U.S. goods. (See the 75th Quarterly Report.) This duration denial order also applies to Ute Hilma Seitz, record owner of the respondent Nema, and the firm Neditron, under which name Waldamar Seitz sometimes does business. Diethard Prosdorf (also known as Peter Prosdorj) * Munich, West Germany Napoleon W. Krassowsky (also known as Werner 1v[iller) Elmhurst, N.Y. Richard G. Terker Scarsdale, N.Y. An order denying the above individuals all U.S. export privileges until further notice was entered on April 16, 1968. All three individuals are under Federal indictment charging them with violations of the U.S. Export Control Act and the Export Regulations, as well as with conspiracy to violate the said act and regulations. Prosdorf allegedly attempted to export strategic electronic equipment without the required license and other export documents. (See the 81st Quarterly Report.) The order will remain in effect until the criminal proceedings are disposed of and until administrative compliance proceedings have been completed. The same order determine4 that the following firms are related to one or more of the respondents: Electronic Handelsgesellsc.haft m.b.H. and Fima Finanzmanagement G.m.b.H., both of Munich, West Germany; Werner Miller Research Associates, Inc., and R.G.T. Corporation, both of Scarsdale, N.Y. These related parties are subject to all of the terms and restrictions of the `order against the respondents. Joseph S. Versch Wiesbaden, West Germany On April 23, 1968, an order was entered extending the temporary denial of export privileges against ~the above individuals until further notice. The temporary denial order had been issued February 19, 1968, and extended on April 1, 1968, because Versch had not stitis- 34 PAGENO="0311" 743 factorily accounted for the disposition of certain stragetic U.S.-origin seismic equipment, valued at $75,000. (See the 83d Quarterly Report.) The same order determined that the following firms are related to the respondent: Petroservice International G.m.b.H., of Wiesbaden, West Germany, and Bavaroil Establishment of Vaduz, Liechtenstein. Emil Blaschke Emil Blaschke d~ Co. G.m.b.H. Stuttgart, West Germany By an order effective May 6, 1968, the above firm and its general manager were denied all U.S. export privileges for 1 year. It was shown that Blaschke, acting individually and for the company, illegally disposed of U.S.-origin winding machines with full knowledge that they were destined for Communist China. After the 1-year denial period, the respondents will be on probation for 3 years. During the probation period their U.S. export privileges will not be restricted. However, in case of a violation during this period, their export privileges may be summarily revoked. G. A. Forrest S.E.D.I.C. (Societe Eurafricaine pour le Developpement de l'Industrie et du Commerce) Brussels, Belgium Effective May 16, 1968, the above firm and its manager were denied all U.S. export privileges for an indefinite period. This action was taken because the respondents failed to furnish information regarding the firm's participation in a transaction involving the unauthorizé~1 reexport of a U.S.-origin he~vy scraping machine, accessories, and spare parts. The machine was shipped from Antwerp toRotterdam and from there was reexported to the U.S.S.R., an unauthorized destination. This indefinite denial order will remain in effect until the respondents comply with the request for information or show good cause for their failure to do so. Agraria S.p.r.l. Corn, Food and Fertilizer Trading Co. Steel Trading Co. Ghent, Belgium A determination naming the above firms as related parties to Andre Gryp, also of Ghent, was issued on May 21, 1968. Gryp was denied all U.S. export privileges for the duration of export controls on February 24, 1958, because of his illegal diversion of. ILS~-origin chemicals to Communist countries. (See the 43d Quarterly Report.) 35 PAGENO="0312" 744 This related party action was taken to prevent Gryp from using the firms, which he now manages and controls, to evade the terms of the 1958 denial order. All of the terms and restrictions of the order against Gryp are now effective against Agraria S.p.r.l.; Corn, Food and Fertilizer Trading Co.; and Steel Trading Co. Jan A. 0. Van Oosterum Karisruhe-Durlach, West Germany An order effective May 24, 1968, denied Jan A. G. Van Oosterum all U.S. export privileges for an indefinite period for f~ilure to provide information concerning his handling of. TJ.S.-origin. electronic equip- ment. The same order determined that the firm Ameco Import, also of Karisruhe-Durlach, owned and operated by Van Oosterum, is a related party. Therefore, all of the terms and restrictions of the denial order are also effective against Ameco. This order will remain in effect until Van Oosterum furnishes the information and documents requested or shows good cause why he is unable to do so. Pierre M. Stevens New York, N.Y. On May 28, 1968, a temporary denial order was entered against the above individual denying him all U.S. export privileges until further notice. Stevens is under Federal indictment charging him with violations of the Export Control Act and the Export Regulations. He is also charged with making false statements in a Shipper's Export Declaration in connéctio~a with the attempted export of $13,000 worth of strategic electronic equipment. (See the 83d Quarterly Report.) The order will remain in effect until the criminal proceedings are disposed of and until administrative compliance proceedings are completed. Heinz Nollmeyer Buchholz/Mordheide, West Germany Effective June 21, 1968, Nollmeyer was denied all U.S. export privileges for an indefinite period. The respondent failed to furnish information concerning his participation in a transaction involving~ an order for $14,000 worth of electronic J~ubes, without showing good reason for his failure to do so. Nollmeyer is a dealer in parts and accessories for automotive and agricultural equipment. This indefinite denial order will remain in effect until the respon- dent complies with the request for information or shows good cause for not doing so. 36 PAGENO="0313" 745 Reinstatement of Export Privileges Pursuant to regulations governing administrative enforcement pro-. ceedings, during the second quarter of 1968 the Department modified its previous orders against the following parties: Rad Reps (Factors), Ltd. Anthony G. Hopkinson Hounslow, Middlesex, England By an order dated June 3, 1968, the Department conditionally restored U.S. export privileges to the above parties and placed them on probation for the remainder of a 5-year period, which will expire April 19, 1971. All U.S. export privileges had been denied Rad Reps (Factors) and Hopkinson for a 5-year period by order effective April 19, 1966, which superseded a temporary denial order in effect since February 25, 1966. (See the 75th and 76th Quarterly Reports.) These sanctions were imposed because the firm, through its director Hopkinson, reexported from EnglancL to-Cube. ~app~pxirnately $80,000 worth of U.S.-origin automotive parts in 1965. On November 8, 1966, a determination was made naming the firm Rad Reps, Ltd., of the same address, as a related party. (See the 78th Quarterly Report.) This firm is also subject to the June 3, 1968, order. The conditions of probation require the parties to comply fully with the provisions* of the Export Control Act and the Export Regu- lations. Failure to comply with the terms and conditions of probation will subject the respondents to summary denial of U.S. export' privi- leges for such period as may be appropriate. Administrative Imposition of Civil Penalty Under the 1965 amendment to the Export' Control Act, the De- partment is authorized to impose a civil penalty not to exceed $1,000 for each violation of the act or any regulation, order, or license issued thereunder. During the second quarter 1968 the Department imposed the following civil penalties: Ailtransport, Inc. New York, N.Y. On June 17, 1968, this firm was fined $400 for four separate infrac- tions of the Export Regulations. The firm was charged with 11 violations, and penalties in the amount of $100 were imposed for each of them. However, the penalty was waived with respect' to se~e1i of the violations. Ailtransport did not contest the charges and consented to the fine. Officials of the firm stated that the infractions were not willful, but the result of clerical errors by its employees. 37 PAGENO="0314" 746 `VI Commodity Control. List as of June 30, 1968 The main purpose of the Department's Commodity Control List is to keep American exporters continuously advised of the commodities for which validated export licenses are required before shipments can be made to foreign countries. With the exception of commodities and technical data related to nuclear weapons, nuclear explosive devices, or nuclear testing, and technical data relating to nuclear propulsion plants, export licenses are not required for commodities exported to Canada for consumption in that country. There are three major categories of country controls reflected on the Commodity Control List: Category I. Commodities which require a validated license for export to all countries of the world (except for internal consumption in Canada); Category II. Commodities which require a validated license for export to all countries of the world outside the Western Hemisphere but including Cuba; and Category III. Commodities which require a validated license for export only to Cuba, Communist areas of Eastern Europe (except Yugoslavia) and Asia, and in some instances, Hong Kong, Macao, Poland, Rumania, Republic of South Africa and Southern Rhodesia. The following table is an abbreviated version of the Commodity Control List as of June 30, 1968. The numerical designations in the first column indicate the appropriate Department of Commerce Export Control Commodity Number. These classifications conform to the first 5 digits of the Bureau of the Census Schedule B classification of commodities for export purposes. Commodities which require a validated export license for country categories I and II, as defined above, are indicated in the third column of the table. Commodities not listed fall within country control cate- gory III, as defined above. At the end of the second quarter of calendar year 1968, the Com- modity Control List showed an increase in the number of entries f all- ing within categories I and II. In these categories there were 1,130 entries at the end of the quarter, of which 1,082 were in category I and 48 in category II. 38 PAGENO="0315" I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 747 Export control commodity number Commodity description Area of control CRUDE RUBBER, INCLUDING SYNTHETIC AND RECLAIMED RUBBER 23120 Synthetic rubber and rubber substitutes 1 I TEXTILE FIBERS NOT MANUFACTURED INTO YARN, THREAD, OR FABRICS, AND THEIR WASTE 26621-26622 Staple and tow wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers and copolymers I 26700 Used, obsolete, and reject materials bearing the design of any version of the flag of I the United States of America. CRUDE FERTILIZERS AND CRUDE MINERALS, EXCLUDING COAL, PETROLEUM, AND PRECIOUS STONES I I I I I 27624 Magnesium oxide, purity 97 percent or higher 27698 Lithium ores and concentrates METALLIFEROUS ORES AND METAL SCRAP 28200 28311-28312 28393-28398 . 28401 ~ 28402-28405 Iron and steel scrap of magnetic materials; and other steel scrap containing nickel, cobalt, or tungsten.' Copper ores, concentrates, and matte Ores and concentrates as follows: tantalum; molybdenum; beryllium; niobium (columbium); quicksilver or mercury; and rhenium. Tantalum bearing slag; niobium bearing slag; and ash and residues of copper or nickel. Waste and scrap of copper, nickel, or magnesium 1 PETROLEUM AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 33220 33250 33291 Jet fuels I Lubricating oils and greases 1 Automatic transmission fluids and hydraulic fluids, petroleum based 1 CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND COMPOUNDS 51202 51203 51205 51208-51209 51321 51325 51329 51329 51338 51340 51364-51369 51460-51470 51500 Miscellaneous cyclic chemical intermediates 1 Betadiethylaminoethyldiphenylpropylacetate hydrochloride Plasticizers 1 Miscellaneous industrial and other organic chemicals' Chlorine Quicksilver or mercury Chemical elements as follows: boron; calcium; lithium; silicon; and yttrium 1 Monocrystalline and polycrystalline forms of: beryllium; hafnium; molybdenum; niobium (columbium); tantalum; titanium; tungsten; and zirconium. Boric acids; and bydrocyanic acid I Chlorine trifluoride Oxides, hydroxides, and peroxides of the following: aluminum; beryllium; gallium; germanium; hafnium; hydrazine hydrate; indium; lithium; magnesium; molyb- denum; nickel; niobium (columbium); rhenium; tantalum; yttrium; and zir- conium.' Miscellaneous inorganic chemicals ` Deuterium and compounds; polonium and compounds; lithium and compounds; and radioisotopes, and compounds and preparations thereof.' DYEING, TANNING, AND COLORING MATERIALS 53310 53332 53335 Phosphor compounds specially prepared for Lasers Varnishes, finishes, enamels, and dispersions made of polyimides, polyimidazo- pyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, polybenzimidazole, poly. imide-polyamide, fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, orchlorendic alkyd resin. Pastes wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers See footnotes at end of table. 39 PAGENO="0316" Export control commodity number Commodity description Area of control MEDICINAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS . 54199 Pharmaceutical goods wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers EXPLOSIVES AND PYROTECHNIC PRODUCTS . 57112 57112 57140 Oil well bullets; and jet perforators - Explosives and priming compositions containing mercury fulminate, lead aside, lead styphnate, lead thiocyanate, tetrazine, diazodinitrophenol, barium styphnate, or lead dinitroresorcinate. S Parts for hunting and sporting ammunition I - II I ~ I PLAST IC MATERIALS, REGENERATED CELLULOSE, AND ARTIFICIAL RESINS 58110 58110 58110-58120 58110-58120 58110-58199 Synthetic film suitable for dielectric use 1 Fluorinated silicone rubbers and compounds; and chiorendic alkyd resins Plastic composites containing silica, quartz, carbon, or graphite fibers - Polyimides, polyimidazoyprrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, polybenzimidazole, polyimide-polyamide, and fluorocarbon polymers and co- polymers; and products made therefrom. Microwave absorber materials of plastic ` -- * . CHEMICAL MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS, N.E.C. 59958 59972 59999 59999 Adhesives or cements made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, polylmides, polybenziinidazoles, polylmidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxy- lylenes,orpolylmide-poylamide.1 Artificial graphite ` Molecular sieves - Hydraulic fluids, synthetic 1 - RUBBER MANUFACTURES, N.E.C. 62101--62l02 62105 62910 62988 Plates, sheets~ strips, and other forms of synthetic rubber made of fluorocarbon polymers and copolymers.1 Rubber hose and tubing lined or covered with, or wholly made of, anyfluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. Tires of a kind specially constructed to be bulletproof or run when deflated; and all aircraft tires and inner tubes. Articles of unhardened vulcanized rubber as follows: microwave absorber materials; and articles wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers and copolymers.' PAPER,_PAPERBOARD,_AND MANUFACTURES THEREOF 64298 Pressure sensitive tape, coated or Impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. TEXTILE YARN, FABRICS, MADE-UP ARTICLES, AND RELATED PROD UCTS 65162-65167 65180 65180 65222-65510 65351-65352 65380 65380, 65543 65401-65692 65510,65692 Monofil, yarn, and thread wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers... Glass fiber yarnsand rovings1 Yarn, roving, and strand made from silica or quartz fibers Used or reject fabric bearing the design of any version of the flag of the United States of America. Broad woven fabrics wholly made of, or coated or impregnated with, fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. Glass fiber tape suitable for use in filament-wound structures 1 Fabrics and tape made from silica or quartz fibers Other textile fabrics and articles thereof, made of, or coated or Impregnated with, polyimides polybenzlmldazoles, polyimidazoprrolones, aromatic polyamides, po- Iyparaxyly~enes, polyimide-polyamide, or fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers.' Flags of the United States of America, except new flags having 50 stars NONMETALLIC MINERAL MANUFACTURES, N.E.C. 66230 High temperature refractories ` 66311 Hoiiing stones for gun barrel honing heads 66311 Diamond grinding wheels fabricated with polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, poly- imidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, polypyromel- litimide, polyimide-polyamide, or fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers.' See footnotes at end of table. I I I I 748 I I I I I I :i I I I 40 PAGENO="0317" I I I I, I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 749 I I Export control commodity number . Commodity description Area of control NON METALLIC MINERAL MANUFACTURES, N.E.C.-Contlnued 66363 66370 66381 66420 66470 66492-66494 66700 66700 Articles of artificial graphite; and carbon or graphite fibers, any form, and products thereof. 1 Refractory products other than construction materials 1 Manufactures of asbestos coated or impregnated with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. Optical glass and lens blanks; and fused f'ber optic plates or bundles 1 Bulletproof glass windshields for aircraft Optic plates designed for Image intensifier or image converter tubes; silica or quartz fibers In any form, and articles thereof; glass fiber pipe and tubing lined or cover- ed with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers; microwave absorber articles of glass fiber; other glass fiber articles containing more than 20 percent by weight of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers; and fused glass fiber optic plates orbundles. Quartz crystals (natural and synthetic); lithium-containing minerals; and syn- thetic monocrystals of ferrites and garnets.' Materials for application in electromagnetic devices1 . IRON AND STEEL 67160 67243-67353 67443-67504 67443-67503 67503 67444-67504 67703 67810-67860 67850-67860 67920-67930 Ferroalloys as follows: ferromolybdenum; ferroboron; ferrocolumbium ferro- columblum-tantalum; ferrotantalum; ferronickel; and ferrozirconlum.' Alloy steel ingots, other primary forms, and bars rods, angles, shapes and sections1~ Steel suitable for making pipe of a size greater than 19 Inches o.d.' Alloy steel plates, sheets, and strip special types only I Thermo blxnetal thernaometal aná thermostatic metaL Carbon steel plaLes, sheets, and strip, gilding metal clad; and magnetic materials a Alloy steel wire, not Insulated 1 Alloy steel pipes, tubes, and fittings, special types only; and tubes and pipes llned with or covered with fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers.' Line pipe of a size greater than 19 inches o.d. and fittings therefor 1 Alloy steel castings and forgings, special types only 1 I I II I II ~ I I II I NONFERROUS METALS 68120 68211-68226 68310-68324 68401-68426 68931-68932 68933 68941 68942 68943 68950 68950 Platinum based magnetic materials1 Copper and copper alloys, wrought or unwrought NIckel and nickel alloys, wrought or unwrought' Aluminum, wrought or unwrought, contaIning 5 percent or more boron MagnesIum alloy, wrought or unwrought' -- Beryllium and beryllium alloys, wrought or unwrought I Tungsten and tungsten alloys, wrought or unwrought 1 Molybdenum and molybdenum alloys, wrought or unwrought 1 Tantalum and tantalum alloys, wrought or unwrought Other metals and alloys, wrought or unwrought, as follows: cobalt; gallium; germanium; hafnium; lithium; monocrystalline Indium; niobium (columblum); rhenium; polycrystalline silicon; titanium; vanadium; and zirconium.' Dendritlc forms of any semiconductor material, or combinations thereof, suitable for use In diodes or transistors. . MANUFACTURES OF METAL, N.E.C. 69110 69110 69211-69299 69312 69524 69524 69887 69891 69891 69892 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 Alloy steel sheets, special types only 1 Bonded, brazed or welded structural sandwich constructions of precipitation hardened stainless steel. Liquefied gas containers, jacketed' Copper and copper alloy wire cable, rope, strand and cord BroachIng tools and deep-hole drills; and parts' Rock drill bits and core bits; and parts ` Welding rods and wires of alloy steel, copper, magnesium, molybdenum, nickel, niobium (columblum), tantalum, titanium, or zirconium.' Articles of magnetic material; and microwave absorber articles I Liquefied gas containers, jacketed, of steel ` Copper and copper alloy castings, forgings, fabricated anodes, cores (mold inserts), and liquefied gas containers, jacketed.' Castings and forgings of beryllium, boron, calcium, gallium, germanium, hafnium, lithium, magnesium, molybdenum, niobium (columbium), polonium, rhenium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten, yttrium, or zirconium.' LIquefied gas containers, jacketed, of nonferrous metals 1 Articles wholly made of beryllium, zirconium, or alloys thereof Thermoelectric materials 1 - Nickel wire mesh 1 - Microwave absorber material 1 Electrical conducting materials designed for operation at temperatures below minus 202°F.(minusl30 C.). Bonded, brazed, or welded structural sandwich constructions of beryllium, molybdenum, niobium (columbium), tantalum, titanium, tungsten, and their alloys. Niobium (columbium) wire and cable I I I I I II I I I I I * See footnotes at end of table. 41 PAGENO="0318" 750 Export control commodity number Commodity description Area of control .* MACHINERY, OTHER THAN ELECTRIC 71110 Water tube boilers, marine type, and parts 1 71120 Heat exchangers and heat exchanger type condensers; superheaters, feedwater heaters and economizers ror marine steam boilers; and parts.1 71130 Steam turbines for use of saturated steam; and parts 1 71141-71142 Aircraft engines and turbines, and parts 71150 Diesel engines, 50 brake horsepower and over, and parts ` 71170 Parts and accessories for nuclear reactors.._.. 71189 Air starters, air turbines, and hydraullcmotors for aircraft 71250 Contractors' off-highway wheel tractors, and other tractors, 125 horsepower and over.' 71420-71492 ElectronIc computers, machines for use therewith, and parts and accessories 71510 Metalworking machines 1 71521 Foundry equipment formanufacture of arms, ammunition, and implements of war 71522 Rolling mills and parts I 71523 Flame cutting machines, and parts' 71842 Excavating and construction equipment; rotary drill rigs; and parts 1 71851 Sand mold making machines and related equipment for manufacture of arms, ammunition, and implements of war. 71852 Glassworking machines for production of electron tubes or semiconductor devices 1 71911 Electrolytic cells 71913-71914 Carbon black furnaces, continuous combustion, controlled reaction type; and parts. 71915 Cryogenic refrigeration equipment I - 71919 Heat exchangers; equipment for the separation of helium from natural gases; equipment for production in liquid form of air, argon, fluorine, helium, hydro- gen, nitrogen, and oxygen; equipment for the production and/or concentration of deuterlum oxide; and equipment for production of nitric acid or for the con- centration of nitrogen tetroxide and/or nitric oxides.' 71919 Vessels for processing radioactive material; and other equipment for processing I irradiated nuclear materials. 71919 Environmental chambers for treating material by a change in temperature ` - I 71921-71922 Pumps, compressors, and blowers; and parts ` 2 I 71923 Centrifuges, separators, and parts 1 21 71931-71932 Integral tractor-shovel loaders; heavy duty industrial tractors and lift trucks; 2 II oil and gas field equipment; and parts.' 71951 Slicing, dicing, scribing, and slice breaking equipment for the manufacture of semi- I conductor devices. 71953 Portable drilling machines for tapping line pipe without interruption of flow `~ - II 71954 Parts, accessories, and attachments for metalworking machines and for machines 2 I for manufacturing semiconductor devices.1 71964 Arc plasma devices; and parts ` I 71970. Bali and roller bearings; and parts ` I 71980 Environmental chambers having a capability of simulating constant environ- I ments such as pressure, radiation and temperature; and parts.' 71980 Sonic wind tunnels and devices; and parts 1 I 71980 Ammunition loading machines, hand loading; and parts - I 71980 Electron beam metalcoating equipment; and parts ` I 71980 Machines for making coaxial and multipair cable; and parts 1 I 71980 Assembling jigs and fixtures for military equipment; and parts I 71980 Equipment for production of military explosives and solid propellants; and parts... I 71980 Nuclear reactor fuel chopping, disassembling, or dejacketing machines; and parts.. I 71980 Machinery for the extrusion of polytetrafluoroethylene coagulated dispersions, or I powders or pastes derived therefrom; and parts. 71980 Filament winding machines; and parts ` I 71980 Equipment for production of electronic components; and parts I I 71980 Equipment for production of synthetic ifim or magnetic tape; and parts ` I 71980 Equipment for the manufacture of semiconductor materials; and parts ` I 71980 Isostatic presses; and parts I 71980 Shell shot automatic blasting machines; and parts I 71991 Molding boxes and molds for artillery molding or casting I 71992 Valves, cocks, and pressure regulators; and parts ` 2 I 71994 Gaskets made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, polyimides, polybenzlmlda- I zoles, polyimidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, or polypyromellitimide.l ELECTRIC MACHINERY, APPARATUS, AND APPLIANCES 72210 Motors, generators, and generator sets, and parts and accessories 1 72210 Transformers, coils, reactors, chokes, power supplies, and magnet controllers 1 72220 Electronic resistors, potentiometers, inductive relays, electronic and microwave switches, motor controls, and other electrical control units; and parts.' 72220 Equipment Incorporating triggered spark gaps. I 72310 Insulated electrical wire and cable 1 72320 ElectrIcal insulators and fittings made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolyiners, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, polylmidazopyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polyparaxylylenes, or polypyromellitimide.' 72410 TelevIsion receivers incorporating or combined with videotape recorders See footnotes at end of table. 42 PAGENO="0319" I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 21 I I I I I I 751 Export control commodity number Commodity description Area of control ELECTRIC MACHINERY, APPARATUS, AND APPLIANCES-Continued 72491-72499 72610 72620 72911-72912 72920 72930 72941 72952 72970 72991 72991 72992 72995 72996 72998-72999 Electronic telecommunications equipment, navigational aids, search and detection apparatus, and parts.' Electromedical infrared detection apparatus and equipment containing Laser, Maser, or Iraser devices. X-ray apparatus and parts I Electrochemical and radioactive devices for the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy.' Flash discharge tubes for Masers, Lasers, and Irasers; and photomicrographic arc lamps for high speed cameras.' Electron tubes and solid state semiconductor devices ` - Electrical Ignition systems with circuits shielded against radio interference, fungus decay, and water.' Electricalmeasuring, checking, testing, or controlling instruments and apparatus L Electronuclear machines, accessories, and parts 1 - Electric and permanent magnets ` Electrical apparatus designed for operation at cryogenic temperatures 1 Electric furnaces, arc devices, welders, and parts 1 Capacitors and parts 1 Electrical carbons, artificial graphite 1 Miscellaneous electrical and electronic apparatus and parts, n.e.c.1 TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT 73105 73163 73201-73300 73410-73492 Railway cars equipped with liquified gas containers 1 Road-rail and similar containers designed for liquified gas I Special-purpose vehicles and other motor vehicles and trailers as follows: military; equipped with liquified gas containers; off-the-road vehicles; pressure refuelers; and trucks mounted with telecommunications equipment, geophysical equip- ment, power cranes and shovels, oilfleld equipment, or drill rigs; and parts and accessories for such vehicles.' Civil aircraft; and parts and accessories.. I PROFESSIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND CONTROLLING INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAPHIC AND OPTICAL GOODS, WATCHES, AND CLOCKS 86111-86112 86133 86139 86140-86150 86171 86172 86182-86199 Optical elements, mounted and unmounted 1 Ion microscopes, and parts ` Military searchlights and parts High-speed cameras and parts including photographic microflash equipment; and cameras designed for production of electronic equipment.' Surgical and medical apparatus wholly made of polytetrafluoroethylene Breathing apparatus, closed and semiclosed circuit, for diving and underwater swimming (scuba). Nonelectric measuring, checking, testing, or controlling instruments or devices, industrial and scientific, and parts.' MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURED ARTICLES, N.E.C. 89111-89120 89300 89300 89300 89300 89442 89715 89927 89962 89998 89999 Recording and/or reproducing equipment, except for voice and music, and parts and accessories. Pressure sensitive tape suitable for dielectric use and/or made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers.1 Microwave absorber articles of artificial plastic materials. I Articles of artificial plastic materials containing silica, quartz, carbon, or graphite fibers. Articles manufactured of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, polyimidazo-pyrrolones, aromatic polyamides, polypara. zylylenes, polypyromellitimide, or polyimide-polyamide.' Breathing apparatus for diving and underwater swimming (scuba) ` Platinum clad molybdenum tubing and wire Nickel wire cloth sieves Prostheses wholly made of polytetrafluoroethylene Parachutes, and parts ` Catapults; and other equipment to facilitate operations of aircraft in confined area& ARMS, MILITARY VEHICLES, ETC. 95106 Parts and components for ammunition I I I 21 I I I I I 1 A validated license is not required for export to Country Categories I and II for every commodity In this category. For detail of items included, see the Comphrensive Export Schedule issued April 1, 1968, and amendments thereto. 2 In genera], the area of control Indicated (either I or II) is appllcable to these commodities. However; certain specific commodities are under the other area of control. 43 PAGENO="0320" 752 VII Supplementary Trade Tables A. U.S. Exports and Imports by Areas, 1961-67 and January-March 1968 B. U.S. Exports to and Imports From Eastern Europe and Communist Areas in Asia, 1961-67, and January-March 1968 C. U.S. Exports to Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965-67 D. U.S. Imports From Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965-67 Table A.-U.S. Exports and Imports by Areas, 1961-67 and January-March 1968 [Millions of doilarsi Area 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 Jan.- Mar. 1968 Total Canada 19 American Republics Cuba Western Europe Near East' Far East Africa ` Other free world areas Eastern Europe and Communist areas in Asia TotaL Canada 19 American Republics Cuba Western Europe Near East 2 Far East Africa' Other and unspecified free ~world areas Eastern Europe and Communist areas In Asia Expo rts, inclu ding reexports 21,000 21, 700 23,347 26, 508 27,478 30,320 31,534 8, 12 1, 846 1,048 2,551 259 1, 939 285 144 55 7, 742 2,064 1,09 (1) 2,44 7 1,48 288 225 59 3,826 3,523 14 7,237 718 4,543 695 310 134 4,045 3,323 13 7,633 843 4,588 786 342 125 4,251 3,264 36 8, 171 816 5,408 843 392 167 4,915 3,832 (1) 9,096 971 5,904 990 460 340 5, 643 3, 788 (1) 9,224 989 6, 137 1,071 486 140 6, 661 4,231 (1) 9,805 1,112 6,617 1,159 537 198 7, 173 4, 126 (1) 10, 099 961 7,269 1, 116 595 195 General Imports 14,716 16,392 17, 140 18, 684 21,366 25,542 26,816 3,270 3,178 ~ 4,062 359 2,579 636 511 85 3,660 3,380 7 4,544 323 3,099 728 569 82 3,829 3,450 (1) 4,731 331 3,332 758 574 85 4,239 3, 524 (1) 5,208 355 3, 716 900 639 102 4,832 3, 675 (1) 6,155 392 4,605 862 703 142 6,125 3,970 (1) 7,678 403 5,481 961 742 182 7,099 3,853 (1) 8,055 308 5,638 891 792 180 `Exports to Cuba were valued at $72,000 in 1964, $5,000 in 1965, $82,000 in 1966, $17,000 in 1967, and none in January-March 1968; and imports from Cuba were valued at $49,000 in 1963, $11,000 in 1964, $1O,00 in 1965, none in 1966, $44,000 in 1967, and $4,000 in January-March 1968. `Includes United Arab Republic (Egypt). Excludes United Arab Republic (Egypt). NOTE.-Exports by area include "special category" shipments forwhicli data were formerly not available. Thus, total exports by area are reported here. 44 PAGENO="0321" ~C) C)~ ~ C)CC'-~ t4 C) t~ C) OO~ OO~ CC CC C) b~ CC C) C) C) C) C) C) C) ~ c~ OC ec C) 00 C) C) C)~ ~ C) )~C) ~ C) C) C) -4- 00 C) C) ~ CC 0CC C-C)E~CCC)-4CC C) C) CCCC C) C) CC C) ~ C) C) C) (N C) C) ~ 4 C) C) C) ~ C) C) -4 C) C) C) C) 4 C) 4CC - CC CCC) -4CC CC C)4CC0C)C)AC)C)C)C) -1C)C) C' o o N z~oo~ o~-~ 0 o C CP C 0 ~ CO N N ~ ~ ~ L~j ~ ~ ~ N E ` -~. C I N IrH -. e4 a' H -o C.-) a (It I-p 0 ~0C. Ii C ~ 0 N 0 0 0 C C C) C) C) C) C) CC C) :4i~~' ~ ~ CO _,-4 )~ C)' CC ~ -4~ 44~C)' C)CC' N N N CI C) C N N C C) CC C 0 C' CC I ` SO~tIt),tIt)~2-':4 C) C) ICC) N) ` ~ C) C) C) ~ C) ~ C)~'C)CC ~4C)~0C) ~ C) ~ 0 C' 0 C' 0 N C `~ C)' C), C)C) C) ,~ C) 00, I-' C)~ CC - C) CC -~~: ~: C)~CC C) C) C) C) C)' -4 ~ C) 0CC CC 0 CC CC C) ~o j4 00~4 -~ ~C)C)~CCCC CCC)C)C)CICC)C) -C)C)C)C)C),p-C)~~ ITJ C C' C) `~ C)' C)C) I~ ~ - C) ~, to' ,~ C) C) CC C)C)~~ , ~ C) C) C) CC CC CC CC 0 C) C)~C)~ C) C)~C) ~ C)' C)C) CC CC CC' ,~-4C) -4 -4 0' C)~C)C-'C) C) ~C)I-'C)CC - ~~)~:C)C)C)C) ~ C)' C)-4 C) CC' ) CC' C) 4 C) C) ~: ~ ~: ~ C)C)C) CC~' -~ -~: C)C)C)C)C)-I' C)- ~ ~ E~fl C)C)CO)~ 0' CCC'CCC)'-I CC I~ C) C)~ C) C) ~ C) C' CO ,,,CCC)~' CCC)C)~O'C) ~ 04' C) C) -~ 4 C) ~ 0 CC PAGENO="0322" _C) ~ _C) C) C) C.) C) -~ ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) 0 I 0 0 C.' `2 - C) C) C) C.) - C) C) C)C)C)C)C)C) C) C) C) C) C) C) -) C) C) C) -) C) C) C) C) ~ C)~ ~_i~ ~2 C) .)~ -1 C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C)-.) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) ,~ C) C) C) -) C) C) C) C) C) C) -~ C) -~ C) C) C) C) C) ~ C) C) 8~ C) -.) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C)C)C),~C)C)C)C): C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C)C) C)C)C)C) C) C) C) ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C,, C) C) -4 O~ ~ C) C) -~ C) C) C) C) C) -~ C) C) -4 C) C) C) C) ,~ C) C) C) C) ~ C) 0 t~j~ CD~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C) ,~ -4 C) C) C) C) ~ C) ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) ~ C) .4 C) C) C) C) ~ C) C) ~ C) 2~ ~1 ~d `->4 ` --C) C) C) -~ C) C) -4 C) .~ C) C)~ ~ ~ C) C) ~C) C)C) ~ C) -4 4 C) C) ~ C) `i-. ~!-~ ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C)-.) C) C) C) ~ S!-' ~ C) C) C) C) C) ~ ~` ~ C) C) C) g~ P'~i~ p~-'c' ~ ~ ,~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) I-' ~ $.) ~ C) ~ C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) -1 C) ~ -4 C) C) -4-4 C) C) ,~ ~ ~- ~ C) ~ C) C) ~ -4 C) Cl) `I ~ 2. ~ ~ ~L E E 0 C" _C) C) C) C) ~ C) -) C) C) C) -) -1 C) C) C)C)C) C) C) C)C) _C) C) . ~. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~: E~ ~ C) C.) C) C.) C) ~ C) C) C) ,C) ~ : p ,-. C) C) C) C)C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) C) ~ ,~ ~ ~ ~ C) C) ~ ~ C)~ ~ ~ C) C) C) C)'_) `C) ,, `, C) C)' C)C), C) C) CC. , C) C) C) C) PAGENO="0323" Commodity Total to Eastern Europe 1965 1966 1967 Eastern Europe, ex- cluding U.S.S.R.1 U.S.S.R. 1965 1966 1967 1965 1966 1967 Clothing, except of fur 2 Professional, scientific, measuring, and control- ling instruments and ap- paratus Printed matter Articles of artificial plastics_ Unspecified commodities for relief Other and unspecified do- mestic exports Reexports' 480 742 292 10 938 1,420 362 713 960 963 14 466 1,344 268 614 1, 639 260 675 276 2,224 366 395 655 235 9 938 933 318 666 869 902 12 466 914 211 561 1, 398 201 8 276 1, 446 334 85 87 57 1 487 44 47 91 61 2 430 57 241 59 667 778 32 1 Includes exports to Estonla, Latvia, and Lithuania. 2 Includes relief shipments. * Less than $500. `Merchandise of foreign origin which entered the United States as imports, and which, at the time of export, were in substantially the same condition as when imported. 47 755 Table C.-U. S. Exports to Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965, 1966, and 1967-Continued [Thousands of dollars] 53 PAGENO="0324" I 0 `I 0 - - ~ b~ ~ -~ - ~` 03 ~ -4 0~ 03-4 ~ 03 ~0 0 .~ -40003 003 CO 03-4 0~ b3 00 .~ 00 03) 03003 03 00 03 b~ 03)03 03 ~` CO ~ ~8 ~ ~ 00 4 03 C~ -300~03 bD 030)0003003 00*4 03 03 03~03 b) C.) - ~ 2 ~ ~co - ~ 03 3~ b) - ~0 ~ 3.0.40 03 00 ~ 03003 ~ C003COC/) ~ 3.) 03 030300303 ~P.*4~b3 -4 3403 00 - - (030)033.3 ~ - 00~ 0334.4 00 0 03 (0 03 03 03 0) ~~c0 C.) 3.3 - 00c0 ~: ~ 23-. 0)3.0(03: ~ .4 34 03 34~i ~ ~ - Co -& ~ - 0~ - - -3.3 ~-4 ~ ~~!! !. 300300 0 3.000 03 3-' 00 03 - E g- ~ ~ 0~ I 2 ~ 00 -430 00033.) 0 -4 3.303 ~ 0)0 ~ 030) Co 300 Co .~ 03(j~~ ~ C.) 0330 30 0) ~3-- ~ Co 3.303, ~cdg -`H S~ ~ -, 34 - 00 3430~03 030303.) 00 - .~ 3-' 030033.3 a) 00 .3-03 co -4 03 03-3:03: 8300334 -~ ~ 03 g~0'~8 ~ i~I ~! 234 09 003 PAGENO="0325" 757 Table D.-U.S. Imports From Eastern Europe by Principal Commodities, 1965, 1966, and 1967-Continued [Thousands of dollars] Commodity Total from Eastern Europe 1965 1966 1967 Eastern Europe, ex- eluding U.S.S.R.' 1965 1966 1967 U.S.S.R. 1965 1966 1967 Sanitary, plumbing, heat- ing, and lighting equip- ment 851 950 970 849 947 969 2 3 1 Furniture Clothing, except of fur Footwear Professional, scientific, measuring, and con- trolling instruments and apparatus Musical instruments, sound recorders, reproducers, and parts Printed matter Glass Christmas tree orna- 1,931 497 3, 111 531 492 1,041 2,398 598 4,456 504 447 1,259 2,353 1,330 6, 143 . 861 . 345 1,429 1,930 489 3, 111 520 433 897 2,398 594 4,450 493 418 1, 134 2,348 1,328 6, 143 857 314 1,229 1 8 11 59 144 4 6 11 29 125 5 2 31 200 ments 598 619 721 598 619 721 Toys, games, and sporting goods Works of art and collectors' 626 416 397 623 407 390 3 . 9 7 Items Basketwork and other 1,120 1,224 1,433 821 978 1, 151 299 246 282 plaiting material artIcles.... Other imports 1,829 2,073 2,301 2,331 2,289 2,705 1,829 1,873 2,301 2, 135 2,289 2,438 200 196 267 I Includes imports from Estonla, Latvla, and Lithuania. 2Less than $500. `Includes an estimate of low value shipments of $250 or less each on informal entry shipments and under $100 each on formal entry shipments. 4 49 PAGENO="0326" 758 APPENDIX Export Control Act of 1949 (As extended and amended by Public Law 89-63, 89th Cong.) AN ACT To provide for continuation of authority for the regulation of exports, and for other purposes Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the "Export Control Act of 1949." Findings SECTION 1. (a) Certain materials continue in short supply at home and abroad so that the quantity of United States exports and their distribution among importing countries affect the welfare of the do- mestic economy and have an important bearing upon fuffiliment of the foreign policy of the United States. (b) The unrestricted export of materials without regard to their potential military and economic significance may adversely affect the national security of the United States. Declaration of Policy SEC. 2. (1) The Congress hereby declares that it is the policy of the United States to use export controls to the extent necessary (A) to protect the domestic economy from the excessive drain of scarce materials and to reduce the inflationary impact of abnormal foreign demand; (B' to further the foreign policy of the United States and to aid in fuffifling its international responsibilities; and (C) to exercise the necessary vigilance over exports from the standpoint of their significance to the national security of the United States. (2) The Congress further declares that it is the polic.y of the United States to formulate, reformulate, and apply such controls to the max- imum extent possible in cooperation with all nations with which the United States has defense treaty commitments, and to formulate a unified commercial and trading policy to be observed by the non- Communist-dominated nations or areas in their dealings with the Communist-dominated nations. 50 PAGENO="0327" 759 (3) The Congress further declares that it is the policy of the United States to use its economic resources and advantages in trade with Communist-dominated nations to further the national security and foreign policy objectives of the United States. (4) The Congress further declares that it is the policy of the United States (A) to oppose restrictive trade practices or boycotts fostered or imposed by foreign countries against other countries friendly to the United States and (B) to encourage and request domestic concerns engaged in the export of articles, materials, supplies, or information, to refuse to take any action, including the furnishing of information or the signing of agreements, which has the effect of furthering or supporting the restrictive trade practices or boycotts fostered or im- posed by any foreign country against another country friendly to the United States. Authority SEc. 3. (a) To effectuate the policies set forth in section 2 hereof the President may prohibit or curtail the exportation from the United States, its Territories, and possessions, of any articles, materials, or supplies, including technical data or any other information, ex- cept under such rules and regulations as he shall prescribe. To the extent necessary to achieve effective enforcement of this Act, such rules and regulations may apply to the financing, transporting, and other servicing of exports and the participation therein by any person. Such rules and regulations shall provide for denial of any request or application for authority to export articles, materials, or supplies, including technical data, or any other information, from the United States, its Territories and possessions, to any nation or combination of nations threatening the national security of the United States if the President shall determine that such export makes a significant con- tribution to the military or economic potential of such nation or nations which would prove detrimental to the national security and welfare of the United States. Such rules and regulations shall implement the provisions of section 2(4) of this Act and shall require that all do- mestic concerns receiving requests for the furnishing of information or the signing of agreements as specified in section 2(4) must report this fact to the Secretary of Commerce for such action as he may deem appropriate to carry out the purposes of section 2(4). (b) The President may delegate the power, authority, and dis- cretion conferred upon him by this Act, to such departments, agen- cies, or officials of the Government as he may deem appropriate. (c) The authority conferred by this section shall not be exercised with respect to any agricultural commodity, including fats and oils, 51 PAGENO="0328" 760 during any period for which the supply of such commodity is deter- mined by the Secretary of Agriculture to be in excess of the require- ments of the domestic economy, except to the extent required to effectuate the policies set forth in section 2(1) (B) or 2(1) (C) of this Act. Oonsultation and Standards SEC. 4. (a) In determining what shall be controlled hereunder, and in determining the extent to which exports shall be limited, any de- partment, agency, or official making these determinations shall seek information and advice from the several executive departments and independent agencies concerned with aspects of our domestic and foreign policies and operations having an important bearing on exports. (b) In authorizing exports, full utilization of private competitive trade channels shall be encouraged insofar as practicable, giving con- sideration to the interests of small business, merchant exporters as well as producers, and established and new exporters, and provisions shall be made for representative trade consultation to that end. In addition, there may be applied such other standards or criteria as may be deemed necessary by the head of such department, or agency, or official td carry out the policies of this Act. Violations SEC. 5. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, in case of any violation of any provision of this Act or any regulation, order, or license issued hereunder, the violator or violators, upon con- viction, shall be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000 or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment. For a second or subsequent offense, the offender shall be punished by a fine of not more than three times the value of the exports involved or $20,000, whichever is greater, or by imprisonment for not more than five years, or by both such fine and imprisonment. (b) Whoever wififully exports anything contrary to any provision of this Act or any regulation, order, or license issued hereunder, with knowledge that such exports wifi be used for the benefit of any Communist-dominated nation, shall be punished by a fine of not more than five times the value of the exports involved or $20,000, whichever is greater, or by imprisonment for not more than five years, or by both such fine and imprisonment. (c) The head of any department or agency exercising any func- tions under this Act, or any officer or employee of such department or agency specifically designated by the head thereof, may impose a civil penalty not to exceed $1,000 for each violation of this Act or any 52 PAGENO="0329" 761 regulation, order, or license issued under this Act, either in addition to or in lieu of any other liability or penalty which may be imposed. (d) The payment of any penalty imposed pursuant to subsection (c) may be made a condition, for a period not exceeding one year after the imposition of such penalty, to the granting, restoration, or con- tinuing validity of any export license, permission, or privilege granted or to be granted to the person upon whom such penalty is imposed. (e) Any amount paid in satisfaction of any penalty imposed pur- suant to subsection (c) shall be covered into the Treasury as a mis- cellaneous receipt. The head of the department or agency concerned may, in his discretion, refund any such penalty, within two years after payment, on the ground of a material error of fact or law in the im- position. Notwithstanding section 1346(a) of title 28 of the United States Code, no action for the refund of any such penalty may be maintained in any court. (J) In the event of the failure of any person to pay a penalty im- posed pursuant to subsection (c), a civil action for the recovery thereof may, in the discretion of the head of the department or agency concerned, be brought in the name of the United States. In any such action, the court shall determine de novo all issues necessary to the establishment of liability. Except as provided in this subsection and in subsection (d), no such liability shall be asserted, claimed, or re- covered upon by the United States in any way unless it has previously been reduced to judgment. (,g) Nothing in subsection (c), (d), or (f) shall limit- (1) the availability of other administrative or judicial rem- edies with respect to violations of this Act or any regulation, or- der, or license issued under this Act, (2) the authority to compromise and settle administrative pro- ceedings brought with respect to violations of this Act or any regulation, order, or license issued under this Act, or (3) the authority to compromise, remit, or mitigate seizures and forfeitures pursuant to section 1(b) of title VI of the Act of June 15, 1917 (22 U.S.C. 401(b)). Enforcement SEC. 6. (a) To the extent necessary or appropriate to the enforce- ment of this Act, the head of any department or agency exercising any functions hereunder (and officers or employees of such department or agency specifically designated by the head thereof) may make such investigations and obtain such information from, require such reports or the keeping of such records by, make such inspection of the books, records, and other writings, premises, or property of, and take the sworn testimony of, any person. In addition, such officers or employ- 53 PAGENO="0330" 762 ees may administer oaths or affirmations, and may by subpoena require any person to appear and testify or to appear and produce books, records, and other writings, or both, and in the case of contumacy by, or refusal to obey a subpoena issued to, any such person, the district court of the United States for any district in which such person is found or resides or transacts business, upon application, and after notice to any such person and hearing, shall have jurisdiction to issue an order requiring such person to appear and give testimony or to appear and produce books, records, and other writings, or both, and any failure to obey such order of the court may be punished by such court as a contempt thereof. (b) No person shall be excused from complying with any require- ments under this section because of his privilege against self-incrim- ination, but the immunity provisions of the Compulsory Testimony Act of February 11, 1893 (27 Stat. 443) shall apply with respect to any individual who specifically claims such privilege. (c) No department, agency, or official exercising any functions under this act shall publish or disclose information obtained hereunder which is deemed confidential or with reference to which a request for confidential treatment is made by the person furnishing such informa- tion unless the head of such department or agency determines that the withholding thereof is contrary to the national interest. Exemption From Administrative Procedure Act SEC. 7. The functions exercised under this Act shall be excluded from the operation of the Administrative Procedure Act (60 Stat. 237), except as to the requirements of section 3 thereof. Quarterly Report SEC. 8. The head of any department or agency or official exercising any functions under this Act shall make a quarterly report, within 45 days after each quarter, to the President and to the Congress of his operations hereunder. Definition SEC. 9. The term "person" as used herein shall include the singular and the plural and any individual, partnership, corporation, or other form of association, including any government or agency thereof. Effects on Other Acts SEC. 10. The Act of February 15, 1936 (49 Stat. 1140), relating to the licensing of exports of tin-plate scrap, is hereby superseded; but nothing contained in this Act shall be construed to modify, repeal, supersede, or otherwise affect the provisions of any other laws author- izing control over exports of any commodity. 54 PAGENO="0331" 763 Effective Date SEC. 11. This Act shall take effect February 28, 1949, upon the expiration of section 6 of the Act of July 2, 1940 (54 Stat. 714), as amended. All outstanding delegations, rules, regulations, orders, licenses, or other forms of administrative action under said section 6 of the Act of July 2, 1940, shall, until amended or revoked, remain in full force and effect, the same as if promulgated under this Act. Termination Date SEC. 12. The authority granted herein shall terminate on June 30, 1969, or upon any prior date which the Congress by concurrent reso~ lution or the President may designate. NOTE The regulations issued under this legislative authority appear in Title 15, Chapter III, of the Code of Federal Regulations, in Parts 368 to 399, inclusive. 55 PAGENO="0332" PAGENO="0333" 765 °°`~+ U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE C. R. Smith, Secretary - Bureau of International Commerce Office of Export Control CURRENT EXPORT BULLETIN Number 970 Supplement to the Comprehensive Export Schedule August 22, ~968 SUBJECT: Distribution License.1 PURPOSE AND EFFECT: The Office of Export Control has established a new validated license designated as the Distribution License. This is a new "bulk-type" licensing proce- dure designed to facilitate the export of certain com- modities under an international marketing program to previously approved consignees. All commodities for which a validated license is required (with a few exceptions set forth specifically in the regula- tions) may be exported under this procedure. The countries to which shipments may be made under a Distribution License are Australia, Belgium, Den- mark, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, United Kingdom, and West Germany. The consignee, under a Distribution License, must be approved in advance by the Office of Export Con- trol as an eligible distributor or user. To be eligible for this approval, the consignee must be (a) a sub- sidiary, affiliate, or branch of the United States ex- porter; (b) any other person or firm serving as distributor for the United States exporter, or its wholly-owned foreign subsidiary, under a written agreement that provides effective means of assuring compliance with United States Export Regulations; or (c) an end-user importing commodities for its own end-use or for use in the production or manu- facture of other commodities. Except in the case of a subsidiary, affiliate, or branch of the exporter, Thu reporting qoi,c,nrnto ccotninrd hr,-rix hoer bern up- pruned by the Bureux of the Budget i,, ueeordu,,ee neith the Fed- e,o1 Reporta Act of 1942. there must generally have been a minimum of a two- year continuous business relationship between the foreign consignee and the United States exporter. Each consignee requesting approval under a Dis- tribution License shall complete, and submit through the United States exporter, three copies of Form FC-1143, Distribution License Consignee Statement. This form conveys certain pertinent information regarding the consignee and provides certain neces- sary assurance and undertakings by the consignee. To qualify for a Distribution License, a United States exporter must have exported during the calendar year immediately preceding the date of his application commodities covered by the applica- tion to the named consignees in a grand total value of not less than $100,000 for the entire list of con- signees. Further, he must have a reasonable expec- tation of a continued ,business volume for the next year of not less than $100,000 in value; and, in addi. tion, he must have a reasonable expectation that the Distribution License, if granted, will replace not less than 40 individual validated export licenses that would otherwise have been required. An application for a Distribution License need not identify each specific commodity to be exported in the same detail required on an individual license ap- plication. However, the exporter is required to file a monthly report covering all exports made during the previous month under the Distribution License. Each Customs Office will be notified of the approval of a Distribution License and exports may be made from any port. Presentation of the license to Cus- toms prior to export is not required, but Shipper's Lawrence C. McQoode, Assistant Secretary for Domestic and International Business Bur.as of International Commerce, Lawrence A. Fox, Director Office of Export Control, Easer H. Mey.r, Director PAGENO="0334" 766 August 22, 1968 Page 2 Current Export Bulletin 970 Export Declarations shall be presented as usual License without prior written authorization by the bearing a full description of the commodities and the United States Government. validated Distribution License number. Although approved consignees may reexport com- EFFECTIVE DATE OF ACTION: August 22, 1968 modities received under a Distribution License to Accordingly, a new Part 378 is added to the Ex- other approved consignees under the same license, port Regulations to read as set forth on the attached no other reexport may be made under a Distribution pages. (See filing instructions at end of Bulletin.) FILING INSTRUCTIONS PAGES TO BE REMOVED N EW PAGES TO BE INSERTED Part Page Number Date Part Page Number 378 Title page April 1, 1968 378 All pages Supplement S.6 April 1, 1968 Supplement S-6 RAIJER H. MEYER, Director Office of Export Control PLACE THIS BULLETIN IN THE BACK OF YOUR COMPREHENSIVE EXPORT SCHEDULE FOR REFERENCE Current Export Bulletins. issued by the Office of Export Control. U. 5. Department of Commerce. for the guidance of all concerned with export regulations and interpretations, are supplements to the Cossprehecoive Export Schedule, doted April 1. 1968. Subscrip- tion map be placed with the Superintendent of Documento, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington. D. C. 20402; or with any field office of the U. S. Department of Commerce. The rate for the Coespreheosive Export Schedule and all Cureeot Export Bulletins is $7.80 to a domestic address. $9.00 to a foreign address. A special air mail service to domestic addsesum only is available for an additional $5.00. (Only the Current Export Bulletins will be sent airmail.) All orders for this service should indicate that the remittance is for this purpose. Individual copies of Bulletins only may be purchased for 25 costa from the U. S. Department of Commerce field offices and In Baum (043 of the U. S. Department of Commerce Building. Remittances should be made in rash, money order or coupons issued by the Superintendent of Documents. U. S. Government Printing Office. PAGENO="0335" 767 PART 378 DISTRIBUTION LICENSE 378.1 Distribution License. 378.2 Commodities subject to the Distribution License. 378.3 Countries of destination. 378.4 Qualification of United States exporter and foreign consignee. 378.5 Applicatiomi for export license. 378.6 Action of Office of Export Control on license applications. 378.7 Export clearance. 378.8 Reexports. 378.9 Direct shipment to distributor's customer. 378.10 Amendment of license. 378.11 Records. 378.12 Reports. 378.13 Exceptions. 378.14 Effect of oilier provisions. Supplement No. 1 to Part 378: Commodities Excluded from Distribution Licensing Procedure. Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0336" § 378.1 DISTRIBUTION LICENSE This Part establishes a procedure for ob- taining a Distribution License, which author- izes exports, during a period of one year, of certain commodities under an international marketing program to consignees that have been approved in advance as foreign dis- tributors or users. § 378.2 COMMODITIES SUBJECT TO THE DISTRIBUTION LICENSE Any commodities requiring a validated license for export to the countries listed in § 378.3, i.e., commodities not identified by the symbol "B" in the last column of the Com- modity Control List (see § 399.1), may be exported under the Distribution Licensing procedure; except: (a) Commodities related to nuclear weap- ons, nuclear explosive devices, or nuclear testing, as described in paragraph 373.7 (b); and (b) Commodities listed in Supplement No. 1 to this Part 378. § 378.3 COUNTRIES OF DESTINATION Exports under the provisions of a Distribu- tion License may be made from the United States to approved consignees in the follow- ing countries of destination only: § 378.4 QUALIFICATION OF UNITED STATES EXPORTER AND FOREIGN CONSIGNEE (a) Applicant.Consignee Relationship The ultimate consignee of a Distribution License must be: (1) A subsidiary, affiliate, or branch of the United States exporter serving as the distributor of the commodities to be exported under this license. This subsidiary, affiliate, or branch must be under the full and active control of the exporter and a majority of any voting stock in the subsidiary, affiliate, or branch must be owned by the exporter; or (2) An agent, representative, or any other person or firm serving as the distributor of the commodities to be exported under this license pursuant to a written agreement with the United States exporter or its wholly- owned subsidiary that provides for effective means for assuring compliance with U.S. export control regulations, including the pro- visions set forth in § 378.11; or (3) An end-user importing the commod- ities for its own use or for use in the produc- tion or manufacture of commodities. (b) Activity of Relationship The United States exporter shall have ex- ported to the distributor (s) and end-user (s) commodities covered by the application in a grand total value of not less than $100,000, for the entire list of consignees in all the eligible countries of destination (~ 378.3), within the calendar year immediately preced- ing the date of filing of the application for a Distribution License. In addition, the ex- porter shall have a reasonable expectation of a continued business volume for the next year of not less than $100,000 in value. The exporter shall further have a reason- able expectation that the Distribution Li- cense, if granted, will replace not less than 40 individual validated export licenses that would otherwise be required. Distribution License 768 (~ 378.1.378.4) Part 378-page 1 Australia Belgium Denmark The Federal Republic of Germany France Greece Italy Japan Luxembourg The Netherlands Norway The United Kingdom Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0337" (c) Duration of Relationship The United States exporter generally shall have had a continuous business relationship for a period of not less than two years im- mediately preceding the date of filing of the. application for a Distribution License with each ultimate consignee named in his applica- tion for a Distribution License; except that this restriction does not apply to an ultimate consignee that is a subsidiary, affiliate, or branch described in paragraph 378.4 (a) (1) above. (d) Evidence of Relationship An applicant for a Distribution License shall have in his possession, at the time the application is filed, documentary evidence of the existence of the relationship with each ultimate consignee, as described above. These documents and records shall be kept and made available for inspection in accordance with the provisions of § 381.11. (The Export Regulations contain further recordkeeping requirements. See § 381.11.) (e) Order Requirement An applicant for a Distribution License need not hold an order as defined in § 372.4 (f) (2) from the ultimate consignee (s) for the commodities subject to this procedure at the time he applies for the license. § 378.5 APPLICATION FOR EXPORT LICENSE (a) Documents Required Each application for a Distribution Li- cense shall include the following documents: (1) Form FC-420, Application Processing Card; (2) Form FC-419, Application for Export License; (3) Form FC-1143', Distribution License `Fuss FC-1143 may be xbta)aed at all U. S. Depa~-tseest af Cxm,seyee Field Offices listed as page i, asd feces the Office xf Expect Cxstecl (Atts: 852), U.S. Depaetsseat xf Cam,seexe. Waahisgtxs, D.C. 20230. Distribution License Consignee Statement (See Supplement S-6 for facsimile of form.) ; and (4) Comprehensive narrative statement by the exporter. An application for a Distribution License need not be supported by the Import Certifi- cate or Consignee Statement otherwise re- quired under §~ 373.2 or 373.65. (b) Preparation of Documents (1) Form FC.420. The applicant shall prepare Form FC-420, Application Process- ing Card, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 372.5 (a) (5) except as follows: (i) "Distribution License" shall be en- tered in the Export Control Commodity Number space; (ii) The Processing Number space shall not be completed; and (iii) The applicant shall enter the word "various" in the commodity description space on the Form FC-420. (2) Form FC.419. The applicant shall pre- pare and submit Form FC-419, Application for Export License, in accordance with the provisions of § 372.5, with the following spe- cific modifications: (i) The words "Distribution License" shall be entered in the space entitled, "Date of Application", in addition to entering the date in the same space. (ii) Where there is more than one ulti- mate consignee, the words "see attached list" shall be inserted in the space entitled "Ultimate Consignee in Foreign Country." Attach to the application a duplicate list, in alphabetical order, of the country(ies) of ultimate destination followed by the name (s) of the ultimate consignee (s) in each country, also in alphabetical order. (iii) All commodities identified by the symbol "A" in the last column of the Com- modity Control List (see § 399.1) shall be either listed separately on the application or on an attachment thereto, or, if feasible, described in related product groups. Ex- amples of acceptable product groups are "Semi-conductors, A type"; "electronic test- ing instruments, A type"; etc. Comprehensive Export Schedule 769 Part 378-page 2 (~ 378.4-378.5) August 22, 1968 CEB 970 97-627 0 - 68 - p1. 2 - 22 PAGENO="0338" Distribution License All commodities not identified by either the symbol "A" or the symbol "B" on the Com- modity Control List having Export Control Numbers with the same first two digits may be combined into a single entry. The com- modity description for each such entry shall be in terms of broad descriptive categories corresponding with the commodity sections and subheadings that appear on the Commod- ity Control List (~ 399.1, pages 4 and 5). (iv) The estimated total value of each "A" commodity or "A" product group and of each group of non-"A" commodities to be exported during the one year validity period of the Dis- tribution License shall be shown in the space provided for the total selling price, and a grand total shall be computed for all of the commodities. (v) The following statement shall be en- tered at the bottom of the space provided for the commodity description on the applica- tion: "No commodity excluded from the Distri- bution License procedure under the Export Regulations will be exported to any consignee in any destination under this Distribution License if this application is approved." (vi) The spaces entitled "Export Control Commodity No. and Processing No.,"" Unit Price," and "Quantity To Be Shipped" shall be left blank. (3) Form FC-1143. Three copies of Form FC-1143 shall be manually signed by the consignee or by a responsible official of the consignee who is authorized to bind the con- signee to all of the terms, undertakings, and commitments set forth on the form. All copies shall be cosigned by the applicant and sub- mitted with the application to the Office of Export Control. (4) Comprehensive narrative statement. A comprehensive narrative statement shall be submitted by the applicant in support of his application for a Distribution License. This statement shall set forth the scope of the applicant's marketing program pertinent to the application and shall detail the nature and duration of the business relationship existing between the applicant and each con- (~ 378.5.378.6) Part 378-page 3 signee. The statement shall fully explain the distributorship agreement, (i.e., the form of ownership or other control existing between the United States exporter and his distribu- tor), or for other consignees, the sales rela- tionship. In addition, the statement shall show clearly thatthe activity of relationship meets the qualifications set forth in para- graph 378.4(b) above and shall include, for each consignee, the volume of business con- ducted in the commodities involved for the preceding year. In this statement, the com- modities shall be shown in the same detail as on the license application. NOTE The preparation of an initial application for a Distribution License entails a substantial amount of work on the part of the exporter. Therefore, a prospective applicant may wish to consult with the Office of Export Control in advance of preparation of his application to obtain a preliminary determina- tion as to the applicability of the Distribution License procedure and to obtain advice as to any special in- formation that may be required in support of the application. § 378.6 ACTION BY OFFICE OF EXPORT CON. TROL ON LICENSE APPLICATIONS (a) Approved License Application (1) Issuance of license. When an applica- tion for a Distribution License is approved, a Form FC-628, Export License, will be is- sued authorizing, subject to the provisions of the Export Regulations and to the terms and provisions of the license, the export of commodities covered during a validity period of one year. The Distribution License will be similar to a validated license described in § 372.11, with the following exceptions: (i) Validation. The license will be vali- dated in the license number space with a stamp which includes a facsimile of the U.S. Department of Commerce seal, the letter "H" and a series of numbers to indicate the year, month, and day on which the license was validated. An explanation of the coded dates 770 Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0339" shown on the license is set forth in the NOTE following § 372.11. (ii) Distribution License Number. Im- mediately below the validation stamp, the Distribution License number assigned to the license will be indicated. This license number will be a four-digit number prefixed by the letter "V", and suffixed by a one-letter code indicating the Office of Export Control li- censing division to which the license was assigned (that is: "C" for Capital Goods Division; "P" for Production Materials and Consumer Products Division; and "S" for Scientific and Electronic Equipment Division). (iii) Table of Denial and Probation Orders. The licensee under a Distribution License is responsible for furnishing promptly to all of his ultimate consignees current reprints of the "Table of Denial and Probation Orders Currently in Effect" and each addendum thereto. Copies of these re- prints, issued April 1 and October 1, may be obtained without charge from the Office of Export Control. (iv) Special Conditions. If any other spe- cial conditions are imposed with respect to the use of a specific Distribution License more restrictive than the general conditions set forth in the Export Regulations, these conditions will be set forth on the license doc- ument at the time of issuance, or the licensee will be advised by other means. (2) Notification to Customs Offices. The Office of Export Control will notify all Cus- toms Offices of the issuance of the Distribu- tion License. (b) Approved Form FC-1143 Concurrently with the approval of a Dis- tribution License application, two validated copies of each approved Form FC-1143 will be sent to the U.S. exporter. One copy shall be retained by the exporter, and one copy shall be sent by the exporter to the approved consignee. The letter of transmittal to the approved consignee shall (a) notify the con- signee that he will be receiving reprints of the U.S. Department of Commerce "Table of Denial and Probation Orders Currently in Distribution License Effect" and addendum thereto listing individ- uals and firms to whom the consignee may not sell or otherwise dispose of the U.S. com- modities received under the Distribution Li- cense, and (b) advise the consignee that, in addition to the other requirements set forth in this procedure, he may not sell or other- wise dispose of any such U.S-origin com- modities when he has reason to believe the commodities will be used in designing, de- veloping, or fabricating nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices, or in devising, carrying out, or evaluating nuclear weapons tests or nuclear explosions. If a consignee is not approved, the form will be returned to the U.S. exporter with a rider stating the reason for rejection. (c) Applications Returned Without Action When a Distribution License application is returned without action, the application together with related documents will be re- turned to the applicant with the Form FC- 204-B, Advice on Application Returned With- out Action. This form will state the reason for return of the license application and will explain the corrections and additional infor- mation required if the application is to be re- submitted for further consideration by the Office of Export Control. (d) Rejected Applications When an application for a Distribution Li- cense is rejected, the applicant will be notified by Form FC-204-A, Notice of Rejection. This notice will explain the reason for rejection. The applicant may apply for an individual or other appropriate type of validated license for transactions covered by the rejected Dis- tribution License application. § 378.7 EXPORT CLEARANCE (a) General Generally, the Office of Export Control will notify all Customs Offices of the approval of a Distribution License within 15 days 771 Part 378-page 4 (~ 378.6.378.7) August 22, 1968 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule PAGENO="0340" after dispatch of the license to the licensee. Therefore, an exporter should not plan to clear an export at an earlier date unless he has verified that notification has reached the Customs Office at the intended port of exit. (b) Presentation of License or Other Approval Action When clearing shipments for export under a Distribution License, the licensee shall, on demand, show to the Customs Officer or Post- master either the original or a photocopy of the license or amendment. The license or amendment however is not required to be filed with the Customs Office or Post Office. When exporting by mail, the Distribution License number shall be entered on the ad- dress side of the wrapper on the package. (c) Limitation on Amount Shipped Exports under a Distribution License of any commodity identified in the last column of the Commodity Control List by the symbol "A" are limited for each entry, during the entire validity period of the license, to the amount shown on the license for that entry. This limitation does not apply to commodities not identified by the symbol "A". Exports of an entry not identified by the symbol "A" may exceed the amount shown for that par- ticular entry provided the total amount of all such shipments does not exceed the grand total of the amounts authorized for all of the commodities not identified by the symbol "A" shown on the license. (d) Shipper's Export Declaration As set forth in the standard instructions for preparing Shipper's Export Declarations, the validated license number must be shown on the Declaration. In the case of a Distribu- tion License the license number is prefixed by the letter "V' (see paragraph 378.6 (a) (1) (ii)). NOTE Although the Distribution License describes the commodities in broad descriptive terms, commodity descriptions on the Declaration shall be specific. The Part 378-page 5 description of a commodity shall (1) conform to the applicable Commodity Control List description, and (2) incorporate any additional information where required by Schedule B; for example, the type, size, or name of specific commodity. (e) Destination Control Statement The following Destination Control State- ment shall be entered on the Shipper's Ex- port Declaration and other relevant docu- ments as prescribed in § 379.10 covering exports made under a Distribution License: "These commodities licensed by the United States for ultimate destination (name of country). Diversion contrary to U.S. law prohibited." NOTE Use of the above-cited statement does not preclude the consignee from reexporting to any of the ex- porter's other approved consignees or to other coun- tries for whom specific prior approval has been re- ceived from the Office of Export Control. In such instances, diversion (i.e., reexport) is net contrary to U.S. law and hence is not prohibited. § 378.8 REEXPORTS (a) Distributor A distributor who is an approved consignee under a Distribution License may not re- export any commodity received under a Dis- tribution License to any consignee in any other country of destination without the specific prior authorization of the United States Government, except that reexports of these commodities may be made to any of the exporter's other consignees who have been approved under the Distribution License procedure. (b) End-User An end-user who is an approved consignee under a Distribution License is not precluded from exporting manufactured products in- corporating U.S. commodities received under a Distribution License to any destination he 772 Distribution License (~ 37&7.378.8) Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0341" has listed on the Form FC-1143 that has been approved by the United States Government. Reexport of the U.S.-origin commodity in the form received is prohibited, unless specifi- cally authorized in writing by the United States Government. § 378.9 DIRECT SHIPMENT TO DISTRIBUTOR'S CUSTOMER If a distributor requests that commodities be delivered directly to his customer in the same country of destination or in another country to which reexport is authorized in accordance with § 378.8 above, the United States exporter may do so under his Distribu- tion License by showing on the Shipper's Export Declaration, the name and address of the customer as ultimate consignee fol- lowed by a footnote. The footnote shall read, "by order of (name of distributor and his address) ," and shall appear below the com- modity description. Unless the name of the distributor appears in this manner on the Declaration, direct shipment may not be made to the distributor's customer under the Dis- tribution License. § 378.10 AMENDMENT OF LICENSE If the exporter desires to add new con- signees to this license or if the amount li- censed under a Distribution License proves insufficient to meet his requirements, he may file new Forms FC-1143 and/or request an increase in the value authorized for export under the license at any time during the validity period of the license. Requests for amendment shall be submitted on Form IA- 763, Request for and Notice of Amendment Action (see Supplement S-4 for facsimile of form), in accordance with the provisions of § 380.2. An amendment request for the addi- tion of a new consignee shall be supported by Forms FC-1143, prepared as required by the Distribution License provisions of paragraph 378.5 (b). Amend- ment of a Distribution License to extend the validity period will not be granted. A new license application with supporting Forms FC-1143 shall be filed for such purpose. § 378.11 RECORDS (1) The U.S. exporter shall retain one copy of each validated or rejected Form FC- 1143 for a period of three years from the date of a validation or rejection. (2) All other forms, documents, corre- spondence, memoranda, books and other records relating to any export from the United States under a Distribution License shall be kept and made available for inspec- tion in accordance with the recordkeeping requirements of § 381.11. (3) All records regarding a sale or reex- port by a distributor who is an approved consignee under a Distribution License shall be retained by the distributor for a period of three years from the date of sale or reexport. As a minimum, these records shall contain for each sale or reexport the following: (i) Full name and address of individual or firm to whom sale or reexport was made; (ii) Full description of each commodity sold or reexported; (iii) Units of quantity or value of each commodity sold or reexported; and (iv) Date of sale or reexport. (4) All of the above-mentioned records shall be made available for inspection, upon request, by the U.S. Department of Com- merce, by a U.S. Foreign Service Post, or by any other accredited representative of the U.S. government. (The Export Regulations contain further recordkeeping requirements. See § 381.11.) § 378.12 REPORTS The exporter shall prepare and submit, on a monthly basis, a report on all exports made 773 Part 378-page 6 (~ 378.8.378.12) August 22, 1968 0 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule PAGENO="0342" during the preceding month under the Dis- tribution License. The report shall cite the license number indicated on the export li- cense and, as a minimum, show, for each con- signee, a separate aggregate value for each commodity category as shown on his license (i.e., for each "A" commodity or "A" product group, and for each non-"A" commodity cate- gory). The report shall be submitted in orig- inal only and transmitted to the Office of Export Control, (Attn: 852), U.S. Depart- ment of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20230. § 378.13 EXCEPTIONS In the event that a United States exporter is unable to meet any of the requirements of Part 378-page 7 this Distribution License procedure, but be- lieves that unusual circumstances warrant a waiver or an exception to one or more of these requirements, he may consult with or write to the Office of Export Control explain- ing the circumstances in full and requesting a waiver or exception. § 378.14 EFFECT OF OTHER PROVISIONS Insofar as consistent with the provisions of this Part, all of the provisions of the Ex- port Regulations shall apply equally to appli- cations for licenses and licenses issued under this Part. 774 Distribution License (~ 378.12-378.14) Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0343" 775 Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 1 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE Eaps~-t Cty Cso,ondity Desssiptiss Nenbs,- 23120 Carboxyl terminated polybutadiene. 23120 Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene. 28311 Copper ores and concentrates. 28312 Copper matte. 28398 Beryllium ores and concentrates. 28398 Rhenium concentrates (salts). 28401 Copper bearing ash and residues. 28402 Copper or copper-base alloy waste and scrap. 33250 Lubricating oil wholly made of fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers (damping fluids). 51209 Dibromotetrafluoroethane. 51209 Polybromotrifluoroethylene. 51209 Guanidine nitrate. 51209 3 Nitraza 1,5 pentane diisocyanates. 51209 Tetrazene. 51209 Bis 2 (2,2' dinitropropyl) formal and acetal. 51209 2 cyanoacetamide. 51209 Di.ethyl methyl phosphonite. 51209 Di-isopropyl amino ethyl chloride hydro- chloride. 51209 Di-isopropyl carbodiimide. 51209 2 di-isopropyl aminoethanol. 51209 Di-methyl hydrogen phosphite. 51209 2,2' dinitropropanel. 51209 Lead styphnate. 51209 Lysergic acid di ethyl amine. 51209 Malononitrile. 51209 Methyl dichior phosphine. 51209 Methyl isonicotenate. 51209 Methyl phosphonyl dichloride. 51209 N. N-diethyl ethylene diamine. 51209 Trichlorotrifluoroethane (e.g., Freon 113 ®; and Freon-TF Solvent ®); and dichiorotetra- fluoroethane (e.g., Freon-114 ®). 51209 Trifluoromonochloroethylene. 51329 Lithium metal. 51329 Boron metal. 51329 Calcium metal. 51340 Chlorine trifluoride. 51369 Beryllium oxides, hydroxides, peroxides, and compounds. 51369 Monocrystalline gallium compounds. 51369 Hafnium oxides containing more than 15 per- cent hafnium by weight. 51369 Hafnium oxides containing 15 percent or less hafnium by weight. 51369 Zirconium oxide containing less than one part hafnium to 500 parts zirconium. 51369 Other zirconium oxide, purity 97 percent or higher, or stabilized with lime and/or magnesia. 51470 Beryllium compounds, including, but not limited to, beryllium nitrate, beryllium sul- fate, beryllium carbonate, zinc beryllium sili- cate. 51470 Hafnium compounds. ®T~-adsna,-k ,-egists,-ed is P~tmt Offim ef ths Usitsd Stst~s. Cs,snndity Dsss,iptiss Master alloys of copper containing 8 percent or more phosphor. Hydrides in which lithium is compounded with hydrogen or complexed with other metals or aluminum hydride. Zirconium compounds containing less than one part hafnium to 500 parts zirconium. Radioisotopes, cycloti~on-produced or natur- ally occurring, having an atomic number 3 through 83, and compounds and preparations thereof; and radium, radium salts and compounds. Other radioisotopes, cyclotron-produced or naturally occurring, and compounds and preparations thereof. Deuterium and compounds, mixtures, and solutions containing deuterium, including heavy water and heavy paraffin, in which the ratio of deuterium atoms to hydrogen atoms exceeds 1 :5000 by number. Other deuterium and compounds, mixtures, and solutions containing deuterium, including heavy water and heavy paraffin. Polonium metal. Polonium-bearing salts and compounds. Lithium as follows: (a) lithium 6 and 7 isotopes, (b) hydrides in which lithium en- riched in the 6 isotope is compounded with hydrogen or its isotopes, or complexed with other metals or aluminum hydride, (c) alloys containing any quantity of lithium enriched in the 6 isotope, or (d) any other material containing lithium enriched in the 6 isotope, including compounds, mixtures and concen- trates. Compounds enriched in lithium 7 isotopes. Resin (plastic) composites, unfinished or semifinished (including molding compounds, laminates and molded shapes), containing silica, quartz, carbon or graphite fibers in any form. Artificial graphite. Continuous yarno and rovings. High temperature refractory cements or bonding mortars, brick and similar shapes, and other refractory construction materials, n.e.c., containing 97 percent or more by weight of magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zirconium oxide stablized with lime and/or magnesium oxide. Artificial graphite products, n.e.c., in block, brick, plate, or rod form, smallest dimension 2 inches or over and having a boron content of one part per million or less, the total thermal neutron absorption cross section Espast Csstml Cus,sndity Nsssbn- 51470 51470 51470 51500 51500 51500 51500 51500 51500 51500 51500 58110 59970 65180 66230 66363 Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0344" Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 2 776 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE-Continued Commodity Deocriptioo being less than, or equal to, 5 millibarns per atom. Carbon or graphite fibers. Artifical graphite products, n.e.c., whether or not containing other materials to give im- proved performance at high temperatures, having an apparent relative density of 1.90 or greater, except nonpyrolytic graphite of density between 1.90 and 1.95 when compared to water at 60°F. (15.5°C.). Refractory products wholly made of boron carbide or boron nitride. Crucibles containing 97 percent or more by weight of magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zirconium oxide stabilized with lime and/or magnesium oxide. Refractory products other than refractory construction materials, n.e.c., containing 97 percent or more by weight of magnesium oxide, berylliuns oxide, or zirconium oxide, or containing zirconium oxide stabilized with lime and/or magnesium oxide. Crucibles and other refractories made of arti- ficial graphite, whether or not containing other materials to give improved performance at high temperatures, having an apparent relative density of 1.90 or greater, except non- pyrolytic graphite of density between 1.90 rind 1.95 when compared to water at 60°F. (15.5°C.). Artificial graphite refractory products, n.e.c., in block, brick, plate, or rod form, smallest dimension 2 inches or over and having a boron content of one part per million or less, the total thermal neutron absorption cross section being less than, or equal to, 5 milli- barns per atom. Ferrozirconium containing more than 50 per- cent zirconium in which the ratio of hafnium content to zirconium content is less than one part to 500 parts by weight. Pressure tube and pipe fittings having a tube or pipe size connection of 8 inches or more inside diameter, for tube or pipe having a wall thickness of 8 percent us' more of the inside diameter and made of (a) stainless steel, or (b) other alloy steel containing 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium. Seamless pressure tube and pipe of 8 inches or more inside diameter, having a wall thick- ness of 8 percent or more of the inside di- ameter and made of (a) stainless steel, or (b) other alloy steel containing 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium. Blister copper and other unrefined copper. Refined copper, including remelted, in cath- Commodity Doscriptio,, odes, billets, ingots, except copper-base alloy ingots, wire bars, and other crude forms. Copper-base alloy ingots. Mastes' alloys of copper. Bars, sods, angles, shapes, sections, and wire of coppes' or copper-base alloy. Plates, sheets, and strips (including per- forated) of copper or copper-base alloy. Copper or copper alloy foil, including paper- backed. Copper or copper alloy powders and flakes. Pressure tube and pipe, coppes'-nickel alloy, of 8 inches or more inside diameter and hav- ing a wall thickness of 8 percent or more of the inside diameter. Other tubes, pipes, and blanks therefor, and hollow bars of copper or copper-base alloy. Pressure tube fittings and pipe fittings, copper-nickel alloy, having a tube or pipe size connection of 8 inches or more inside di- ameter, for tube or pipe having a wall thick- ness of 8 percent or more of the inside diameter. Bars, rods, angles, shapes, and sections of porous nickel having a purity of 99 percent or more. Other bars, sods, angles, shapes, sections, and wire of nickel alloy containing 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel-copper alloys containing not snore than 6 percent of other alloying elements. Nickel powders with a particle size less than 200 microns. Plates, sheets, strips, and foil of porous nickel having a purity of 99 percent os' more. Tubes, pipes, blanks and fittings thes'efor, and hollow bars of porous nickel having a purity of 99 percent or more. Pressure tube and pipe fittings containing 32 percent or more nickel, having a tube or pipe size connection of 8 inches or more inside diameter, fos' tube or pipe having a wall thick- ness or 8 percent or more of the inside dianseter. Beryllium metal or beryllium alloys contain- ing more than 50 percent beryllium, wrought and unwrought, and waste and scrap. Hafnium metal and alloys containing more than 15 percent hafnium by weight. Rhenium metal and rhenium metal alloys, wrought or unwrought. Zirconium metal and zirconium alloys contain- ing more than 50 percent zirconium in which the ratio of hafnium content to zirconium content is less than one part to 500 parts by weight, wrought and unwrought, and waste and scrap. Comprehensive Export Schedule Export Control Commodity Numbs Export Control Commodity Numbo 66363 66363 66370 66370 66370 66370 66370 67160 67850 67860 68211 68212 August 22, 1968 68212 68213 68221 68222 68223 68224 68225 68225 68226 68321 68321 68322 68322 68323 68323 68933 68950 68950 68950 CEB 970 PAGENO="0345" 777 Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 3 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE-Continued Commodity Desoeiptio,s Copper or copper-base alloy castings and for- gings. Beryllium or beryllium alloy castings and forgings containing more than 50 percent beryllium. Hafnium metal and hafnium alloy castings and forgings containing more than 15 per- cent hafnium by weight. Polonium metal castings and forgings. Rhenium or rhenium alloy castings and for- gings. Zirconium or zirconium alloy castings and forgings containing more than 50 percent zirconium in which the s-atio of hafnium con- tent to zirconium content is less than one part to 500 parts by weight. Other articles wholly made of zirconium or zirconium alloys containing more than 50 per- cent zirconium in which the ratio of hafnium content to zirconium content is less than one part to 500 parts by weight. Other articles wholly made of zirconium or zirconium alloys. Articles wholly made of beryllium. Wire mesh, all types, including electroformed, containing 95 percent or more nickel, with 60 or more wires per linear centimeter or the equivalent thereof. Heat exchangers and heat-exchanger type condensers specially designed for nuclear re- actors; and specially designed parts and ac- cessories, n.e.c. Tubular type heat exchangers designed to operate at pressures of 1,500 psi and above and with all flow contact surfaces made of or lined with 10 percent or more nickel and/or chromium; and specially designed parts and Heat exchangers and heat exchangor type condensers, tubular, designed for use in steam pow-es generation and to operate at pressures of 300 psi and over and with all flow- contact surfaces made of any of the following materials: aluminum, nickel, tita- nium, zirconium, or alloys containing 60 per- cent or more nickel, either separately or combined, and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Steam turbines designed for use of saturated steam for an output of 2,000 horsepower (1,500 kilowatts) up to and including 100,- 000 horsepow-er (75,000 kilowatts); and parts and accessories, n.e.c. Parts and accessories, n.e.c., specially fabri- cated for nuclear reactors, including mechani- cal devices designed to control or shutdown a nuclear reactor. Espeet Com,sodity Commodity Deooyiptios Nombyt 71420 Advanced electronic computers, i.e., those with a bus rate of 50,000,000 bits per second or more. 71911 Electrolytic cells for the production of fluo- rine, with a production capacity greater than 250 grams of fluorine per hour. 71911 Other electrolytic cells, n.e.c., and specially designed parts. 71919 Equipment specially designed for the pro- duction and/or concentration of deuterium oxide; and specially designed parts. 71921 Industrial pumps having all flow-contact sur- faces made of any of the following materials: (a) 90 percent or more tantalum, titanium, or zirconium, either separately or combined, (b) 50 percent or more cobalt or molybdenum, either separately or combined. (c) polytetra- fluoroethylene, or (d) polychlorotrifluoroethy- lene; and parts and attachment, n.e.c. 71921 Vertically shafted centrifugal pumps, gland- less, hermetically sealed (canned) type or mechanical pressurized sealed type, having oIl flow- contact surfaces made of or lined with 10 percent or more nickel and/or chro- mium and rated at 50 kilowatts or more; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71921 Other centrifugal pumps, glandless, hermeti- cally-sealed (canned) type, having all flow- contact surfaces made of 10 percent or more chromium or nickel, either separately or com- bined; and parts and attachments, n.e.c. 71921 Pumps designed to move molten metals by electro-magnetic forces; and parts and at- tachments, n.e.c. 71922 Compressors and blowers (turbo, centrifugal, and axial flow types) having a designed capacity of 60 cfm or more and all flow--con- tact surfaces made of aluminum, nickel, or alloy containing 60 percent or more nickel; and specially designed parts and attachments. 71923 Counter-current solvent extractors specially designed for the extraction of radioactive substances (for example, pulsed columns and mixes-settlers made of stainless steel) ; and specially designed parts. 71923 Equipment for filtering, purifying, separating or treating radioactive impurities from nu- clear reactor coolant; and specially designed parts. 71923 Gas centrifuges capable of the enrichment or separation of isotopes; and specially designed parts. 71923 Other centrifuges, power-driven, bow-I type, with all product contact surfaces of alumi- num, nickel, or alloy containing 60 percent or more nickel; and parts. 71923 Centrifuge bowls, wholly tttade of or lined Expoet Csstrot Commodity Numbet 69892 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 69899 71120 71120 71120 71130 71170 Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0346" Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 4 778 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE-Continued Commodity Deossiptios with aluminum, nickel, or alloy containing 60 percent or more nickel; and parts. Nuclear reactor fuel chopping, disassembling, or dejacketing machines; and specially de- signed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Hot or cold isostatic presses, as follows: (a) capable of achieving a maximum working pressure of 20,000 psi or greater and posses- sing a chamber cavity with an inside diameter in excess of 16 inches, or (b) capable of achieving a maximum working pressure of 5,000 psi or greater and having a controlled thermal environment within the closed cavity, except those possessing a chaonber cavity with an inside diameter of less than 5 inches and which are also capable of achieving and main- taining a controlled thermal environment only between plus 176°F. (plus 80°C.) and minus 30°F. (minus 35°C.); and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Pipe valves having all of the following char- acteristics: a pipe size connection of 8 inches or more inside diameter, all flow contact sur- faces made of or lined with alloys of 10 per- cent or more nickel and/or chromium and rated at 1,500 psi or more; and specially de- signed parts, n.e.c. Valves, 1 inch or more in diameter, fitted with bellows seal, and svholly made of or lined with aluminum, nickel, or alloy containing 60 per- cent or more nickel, except those having metal to metal seats; and specially designed parts. Valves, cocks, or pressure regulators with all flow contact surfaces made of or lined svith polytetrafluoroethylene or polychlorotrifluoro- ethylene; and specially designed parts. Other valves fitted with bellows seal, and wholly made of or lined with aluminum, nic- kel, or alloys containing 60 percent or more nickel; and specially designed parts. Generators and turbine-generator sets speci- ally designed for use with nuclear reactors; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Other turbine-generator sets specially de- signed for use of saturated steam; and parts and accessories, n.e.c. Wire and cable coated with or insulated with polyvinyl fluoride. Wire and cable coated with or insulated with other fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers. Coaxial-type communications cable as fol- lows: (a) containing fluorocarbon polymers or copolymers, (b) using a mineral insulator dielectric, (c) using a dielectric aired by discs, beads, spiral, screw, or any other means, (d) designed for gas pressurization for the Commodity Deoe,iptios purpose of withstanding external overpres- sure or for raising the maximum voltage rat- ing of the cable, or (e) intended for sub- marine laying. Other coaxial cable. Communications cable containing more than one pair of conductors as follows: (a) sub- marine cable, or (b) cable containing fluoro- carbon polymers or copolymers. Other communications cable containing more than one pair of conductors and containing any conductor, single or stranded, exceeding 0.9 mm. in diameter. Insulated nickel or nickel alloy wire as fol- lows: (a) insulated thermocouple nickel chrome wire containing less than 95 percent nickel and within a diameter range of 0.2 mm. to 5 mm. both inclusive, or (b) other in- sulated nickel or nickel alloy wire containing 32 percent or more nickel, except nickel cop- per alloy wire containing not more than 6 percent of other alloying elements. Other copper or copper-base alloy insulated wire and cable. Flash discharge type X-ray tubes; and speci- ally designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. X-ray machines having any of the following characteristics: (a) peak power exceeding 500 megawatts, (b) output voltage exceeding 500 kilovolts, or (c) output current exceeding 2,000 amperes with pulse width of 0.2 micro- seconds or less; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Electra-chemical and radioactive devices for the conversion of chemical energy to electri- cal energy, having any of the following char- acteristics: (a) fuel cells, including regenera- tive cells, (i.e., cells for generating electric power, to which all the consumable compon- ents are supplied from outside the cells), (b) primary cells possessing a means of acti- vation and having an open circuit storage life in the unactivated condition, at a tem- perature of 70°F. (21°C.), of 10 years or more, (c) primary cells capable of operating at temperatures from below minus 13°F. (minus 25°C.) to above plus 131°F. (plus 55°C.), including cells and cell assemblies (other than dry cells) possessing self-con- tained heaters, or (d) power sources other than nuclear reactors based on radioactive materials systems, except those having a power output of less than 0.5 watts itt which the ratio of output (in watts) to weight (in pounds) is less than 1 to 2; and specialized parts, components, and subassemblies there- for. Espoet Costeol Commodity Nombee Eopoet Cootool Commodity Nombe~ 72310 72310 72310 72310 72310 72620 72620 72911 71980 71980 71992 71992 71992 71992 72210 72210 72310 72310 72310 August 22, 1968 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule PAGENO="0347" 779 Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 5 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE-Continued Co,omodity Dosoriptioo Image converter tubes specially designed for light shutter applications and having shutter speeds of less than 100 nanoseconds. Cold cathode tubes and switches, as follows: (a) triggered spark-gaps, having an anode delay time of 15 microseconds or less and rated for a peak current of 3,000 amperes or more; or (b) cold cathode tubes, whether gas filled or not, operating in a manner similar to a spark gap, containing three or more electrodes and having all of the following characteristics: (i) rated for an anode peak voltage of 2,500 volts or more, (ii) rated for peak currents of 300 amperes or more, (iii) an anode delay time of 10 microseconds or less, and (iv) an envelope diameter of less than 1 inch (25.4 mm.). Other cold cathode tubes operating in a man- ner similar to a spark gap, containing three or more electrodes and rated for a peak anode current of 30 amperes or more. Nuclear radiation detection and measuring in- struments designed to measure neutron flux in connection with the determination of the power level of an operating nuclear reactor. Other nuclear radiation dosimeters capable of measuring dosages above 5 roentgens in one exposure. Vibration testing equipment capable of pro- viding a thrust greater than 2,000 pounds. Vibration testing equipment capable of pro- viding a thrust of 2,000 pounds or less. Control equipment specially designed for hot or cold isostatic presses (No. 71980) which are subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Verification procedure. Control equipment specially designed for hot or cold isostatic presses (No. 71980) requir- ing a validated license to all Country Groups but not subject to the Import Certificate/ Delivery Verification procedure. Mass spectrographs and mass spectrometers, as follows: (a) all multifocus types (includ- ing double focus, tandem and cycloidal); or (b) single focus types possessing a radius of curvature of 5 inches or more. Other mass spectrographs and mass spectro- meters, except mass spectrometer type leak detectors. Neutron generators employing the electro- static acceleration of ions; and specially de- signed parts. Accelerators, as follows: (a) betatrons, syn- chrotrons, cyclotrons, synchrocyclotrons and linear accelerators, (b) electron accelerators capable of imparting energies in excess of 500,000 electron volts, and (c) other electro- Co,oos~dity Dosoriptioc nuclear machines capable of imparting ener- gies in excess of 1,000,000 electron volts to a nuclear partiele or ion; and specially designed parts. Neutron generator tubes designed for opera- tion without external vacuum system, and utilizing electrostatic acceleration to induce a tritium deuterium nuclear reaction; and spe- cially designed parts. Magnets specially designed for electronuclear machines capable of imparting energies in excess of 1,000,000 electron volts to a nuclear particle or ion. Electric cold crucible vacuum induction fur- naces designed to operate at pressures lower than 0.1 millimeter of mercury and at tem- peratures higher than 2012°F. (1100°C.). Electrical carbons, except carbon brushes, ar- tificial graphite, whether or not containing other materials to give improved performance at high temperatures, having an apparent relative density of 1.90 and greater, except nonpyrolytic graphite of density between 1.90 and 1.95 when compared to water at 60°F. (15.5°C.). Electrical carbons, except carbon brushes, ar- tificial graphite, smallest dimension 2 inches or over and having a boron content of one part per million or less, the total thermal neutron absorption cross section being less than, or equal to, 5 millibarns per atom. Other electrical carbons, except carbon brushes, artificial graphite, smallest dimen- sion 2 inches or over. Nonmilitary helicopters as follows: (a) over 10,000 pounds empty weight, or (b) 10,000 pounds or less empty weight of types which have been in or (b) 10,000 pounds or less empty weight of types which have been in normal civil use for one year or less, except piston engine powered. Nonmilitary aircraft, heavier-than-air, of types which have been in normal civil use for one year or less except piston engine powered. Nonmilitary ground effects machines (GEMS), including surface effect machines and other air cushion vehicles, which have been in normal civil use for one year or less, except piston engine powered. Other nonmilitary ground effects machines (GEMS), including other surface effect ma- chines and air cushion vehicles. Streak cameras having writing speeds of 8 mm/microsecond and above, capable of re- cording events which are not initiated by the camera mechanism; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. Eoport Co,strol Commodity Nomber Eopoot Cootcol Commodity Nombor 72930 72930 72930 72952 72952 72952 72952 72952 72952 72952 72952 72970 72970 72970 72991 72992 72996 72996 72996 73410 73410 73410 73410 86140 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0348" Supplement No. 1 to Part 378-page 6 780 COMMODITIES EXCLUDED FROM DISTRIBUTION LICENSING PROCEDURE-Continued Commodity Deonription Streak cameras having writing speeds of less than 8 mm/microsecond, capable of recording events which are not initiated by the camera mechanism; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. High-speed cameras having any of the follow- ing characteristics: (a) using film widths 35 mm. or narrower and capable of recording at rates in excess of 3,000 frames per second when using a steady light flow as the lighting source, and 10,000 frames per second when using flash equipment connected to the un- winding system as the lighting source, (b) using film widths greater than 35 mm. and capable of recording in excess of 64 frames per second, or (c) capable of record- ing in excess of 250,000 frames per second; and specially designed parts and accessories, n.e.c. High-speed motion picture cameras having any of the following characteristics: (a) us- ing film widths 35 mm. or narrower and capa- ble of recording at rates in excess of 3,000 frames per second when using a steady light flow as the lighting source, and 10,000 frames per second when using flash equipment con- nected to the unwinding system as the light- ing source, (b) using film width greater than C,,m,oodity Deocripti,,n 35 mm. and capable of recording in excess of 64 frames per second, or *(c) capable of re- cording in excess of 250,000 frames per sec- ond; and specially designed parts and acces- sories, n.e.c. Mass spectrographs and mass spectrometers, as follows: (a) all multifocus types (includ- ing double focus, tandem, and cycloidal), or (h) single focus types possessing a radius of curvature of 5 inches or more; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. Other mass spectrographs and mass spectro- meters, except mass spectrometer type leak detectors; and specially designed parts, n.e.c. Parts (including positive ion sources), as- semblies, components, and accessories, n.e.c., specially designed for mass spectrographs and mass spectrometers under No. 72952 which are subject to the Import Certificate/Delivery Verification procedure. Parts and accessories, n.e.c., for other mass spectrographs and mass speètrometers. Parts and accessories, n.e.c., for nuclear ra- diation dosimeters. Wire cloth sieves, all types, including electro- formed, containing 95 percent or more nickel, with 60 or more sieves per linear centimeter or the equivalent thereof. Export Control Commodity Number Eopo,t Control Commodity Number 86140 86140 86150 86198 86198 86199 86399 86199 89927 August 22, 1968 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule PAGENO="0349" Supplement 781 S-6----page 1 Fo:m Apptooed; Bodge: Bneau No. 41-82460 FORt.t FC-1143 ~ U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OFINTERNATIONALCOt,tt.IECCE DISTRIBUTION LICENSE 1. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONSIGNEE Name Street and number CONSIGNEE STATEMENT City Reference (If drsierd) INSTRUCTIONS - This form must be submitted by the consignee, in three copies, to the euporter named in Item 2 belorn. Only Items 1 theough 8, inclusive, are to be completed by the consignee. Item is to be completed by the United Stutes eopmtee. In all cases, th esigsatuees required most be those of responsible officials who are an thorized to bind the fiems for which they sign. If more space is needed, attach an additional copy of this form oe sheet of papee signed as required in Ite,ns 8 and 9. The information furnished herewith is to be used i nconnec tion with an application foe a license from the United States Govern- ment for the enpoet of United States commodities. 2. REQUEST I(We) request that this statement be considered apart of every order for the commodities shown in Item 3 below, placed with for eoport to me (us), during the validity period of the eel evant eu port license issued to the eopoeter. 3. COMMODITIES I (We) eupect to place orders with the euporter named above for the following commodities: Commodity Description (Drtceibr brirfiy) 4. NATURE OF BUSINESS AND REAHI NAMED IN ITEM 2(CnwpIer~ n. Noture of my (our) usual busi::ess is: Distributue, broke~, sal cv agent, mucufu~zuecr, etc. b. My (our) business relationship with the U.S. enporter is: Frau- II (We) have had this business relation- chivee, eoclusive soles agency, authorized sales agency, coo- J ship for: (no. of yrars) tower, etc. (Opecify) S. DISPOSITION OR USE OF COMMODITIES (Chech nod ~ - I (We) ceetify thut the comwedity(ies) listed it: Item 3: [~j Wjll be resold by me (us) in the form in which received in the country sowed io lien: 1 or reeopoered in the form received only to approved FC-1143 coosigr:ees of the esporrer oowed in Item 2. [1 Will be used by me (us) in the form to which reeeined in the country cowed in Item ~W:ll he used by me (us) is the production or manufacture of____ in the coUntry named in Item 1 for distribution in (Numrntcoontry(trn) Comprehensive Export Schedule CEB 970 August 22, 1968 PAGENO="0350" S-6-page 2 782 6. Additinanal infcemarion (Any other ,eateeiat fa~ta e.'hich roil, be of eeIn~ in co,taideel,tf hi tatatemert I) Supplement 7. Assistance in preparing statement (Names of pre000a, other th5n rieplayees of fiem named in Item 1, rho assisted in perpaeinf I (We) certify rhot all the facts contained in thin statement are true and correct to the bent of my (our) knowledge and above I (We) shall belief and I (we) do not know of any additional facts which are inconsistent with statement. of facts or intentions promptly send a supplemental statement to the enporser named in Item 2, disclosin gany change and forwarded. I (We) farther certify set forth in this statement which occurs after the statement prepared transship nr other- that I (we) will not, wirhoot prier weitren approval of the United government: a. consi of the wise dispose of any commoditie scosored by this statement eocepr to other approved FC-l14) gores en- this where there in panter named in Item 2; b. Sell oe otherwise dispose of any commodity covered by state went of commoditie scoseeed tenses to believe that the commodities will be reenported; n. Se(l or otherwise dispose any Denial and Probation by this stare ment to any person or firm listed on the U. S. Department of Commerce g , Orders. Signature of Official of Firm Named in Item 1. (Srr ioateacti000 on reool of face) Sign here in ink Date signed - Print Name of person signing this document Title 0 type I (We) rnqoest that the firm named in Item 1 be approved as an FC-1143 consignee to whom I (we) may report commod- obliga- r .3' ties under the Distrihotion License procedure. I (We) andenstand that all usdertakings, commitments, dons, and responsibilities under the Disnribotion License procedure, and rhr Enporr Regslations reloted there- this is validated the Of- to, ore folly applicable to any export to the above nmnrioned consignee lice of Eopant Control. No corrections, additions, or alterations were made on this form by me os) after the form was otherwise dispose of 3 signed by the official named in Item 8 above. I (We) certify that I (we) will not esport or any commodities covered by Distribution License(s) issued to we (os) to the consignee named is Item 1, onril thin Form .3 3. has been vu lidared or after it has expired an been revoked. .y ~ ~n ~ Signature of person aorhoniznd to certify for enpmrer Sign here in ak Dare signed Priet or Name of enporren firm Name and title of pert on signing this document type denial of participation in United Snares enponts. Nororial an Governmental certification i snot required. DO NOT WRITE BELOW THIS LINE. FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY NOT APPROVED UNLESS THE OFFICIAL VALIDATION STAMP APPEARS HEREON ACTION TAKEN BY THE UNITED STATES OF COMMERCE Validution Approval of this form by the United States Government darn not remove the need to obtain authorization from any other govern- ment fan the proposed use or disposition of the commodities con- erd. If authanizasion fan the use or disposition of these commod- ities is required coder the laws of any other government, such authorization should be obrainrd in additinn to that of the United States Government. Eopiration Date ~ Approved ~ Rejected United States Department of Cxmmercr Butrau of International Commerce Office of Export Control (D tr) Wafhington, D. C. 20230 August 22, 1968 CEB 970 Comprehensive Export Schedule PAGENO="0351" 783 FOAM FC-842 U.S. DEPARTMENT SF COMMERCE (4-1-65) BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE OFFICE OF REPORT CONTROL SINGLE TRANSACTION STATEMENT BY CONSIGNEE AND PURCHASER 1. UltEmote uooslgoee come mud eddtess AND NSMEER coy______________________________ REFERENCE (if de,ieod) GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS This forts most be sobtsitted by the importer (ultimaEe coo- required it oskso,ss or the item does sot apply, sellEr is the signee shotes is Etem I) and by the ocerseas bayer or par- appropeiate teseds "UNKNOWN" or "NOT APPLICABLE." chaser, to the United Slates es oetee or teller teith tchom the The signatures re qaieed in Items 9 asd 10 most be those of ordeefoethecommoditiesdenceibrdinltem3hasheenplaced. eespossiblesfficialssehoareanthoetardtobindthefirmsof Thereafter, the U.S. euportrr most pretest his compleled form the oltimate consignee and porchaser 10 Abe commitments 10 the U.S. Departmest of Commerce mithin 90 days from the this statement. Ef store space is seeded, attach as additional date appearing is Item 9 or Item 10, t'chichrcer is later. AIR copy of this foem or sheet of paper ntgsrd as is Etems 9 and items mu this fo,'m must be uempltted. Where the informatios 10. 2. Request We request that this stalement be costidered a part of the application for ropoet license filed by U.S. rspoelee or U.S. pesos oith ,cho,o sr hace ptacrd or,r cede, (e,de, po/t) for eoport to us of the commodities described is Etem 3. 3. CommodIties We hace placed as order seith the peessn named in Item 2 for the follotcing commodities in Ihe quantity and caine indicated brlosc: QUANTITY COMMODITY DESCRIPTION VALUE 4. Netu.'e of busitess )Csosplott the fsllno'ing stotontes using thu nppenpoioto tees.) (Foe 000o,ple: b,-ukte, disteibato,, fsbei,sts,, eeseafnetaeoe, ehsb- Tbe natore ofoor utoal b. (Rf the commodities os'e fot s'eseRe) Tb r nature of 5. Dlsposltloo of commodIties (Chmk need rsreplttt the appespeiste bus) We certify that the commodity or commodities litted in Etem 3 o. scill not be sold for use oottidr the coantey named is 11cm I. b. ~ may be reeuported is the foem recriced to Nate. of co,,,te, (Roprsdartiso of thjs lose is peeeeeiccible; pesridtd El-ott rsetret, Incest, ciat, ned mIsc of pspee see tht cseee.) PAGENO="0352" 784 6. Specific end use (Cheek neil noeeplntn npprnprintn boast.) a. We will use the commodities listed in Item 3 fur: (I) D Resale in the form received. (2) El Pruduction or manufacture of Name nffiuolpeodoctc in ________________________________ and distributiun in Nameofcoootey nec000ieies Namenfcoouteyuecoonteiec b. Our customers mill use the commodities for: (I) :~ Resale in she form received from us. (2) :~ Production or manufacture of Name uffixolpeudocu in _______________________________ and distribution in Nameufcoouteynevoooieies Nameofcuootey c. Other end use by us or by our customers_... 7. AdditIonal Information (Any othhr mateeial facts which mill be of value in considering applications for licenses covered by this 8. Aulutancehc preparIng statement (Names of persons ether than employees uf consignee or purchaser who assisted in the preparation 9. CERTIFICATION OF ULTIMATE CONSIGNEE (This Item Is no be compl.ted by the ultimate consignee only) We certify that all of the facts contained in this statement are teue and correct to the best of our knowledge and belief and we do not know of any additional facts which are inconsistent with the above statement. We shall promptly send a supplemental statement to the person named in Item 2, disclosing any change of facts or intentions set forth in this statement which occurs after the state- ment has been prepared and forwarded. Except ax specifically authorized by the United States Export Regulations, nr by prior writ- ten approval of the United States Department of Commerce, we will not reenport, resell, or otherwise dispose of any commodities listed in Item 3 above: (I) to any country not approved foe export as brought to our attention by means of a Bill of Lading, com- mercial invoice, or any other means; or (2) to any person if there is reason so believe that it will result, directly or indirectly, in dis- position of the commodities contrary so the representations made in this statement or contrary to United States Export Regulatinns. Sigooicee of official nf flew nnmrd io Item I. Nuwr nod title uf percun signiog ibis dovoweni Date uf s,goiog (lee ioiiecvt,om ooJeot of/em) 10, CERTIFICATION OF PURCHASER (This Item Is to be completed onlys (1) where the purchaser Ii not the same as the ultimate consignee; or (2) where the ultImate consignee Is unbnown.) We certify that all of the facts contained in this statement are true and correct to the beet of nur knnwlrdge and belief and we do not know of any additinnal facts which are inconsistent with the above statement. Exce t as specifically authorized by the United Siatm Export Regulations, nr by prior written approval of the United States Department o( Commerce, we will not reexpori, resell, or otherwise dispose of any cnmmndities listed in Item 3 abnve: (II so any cnontry xxi approved for export as brought so our aitentinn by means of a Bill of Lading, commercial invoice, or any other means; or (2) to any porno if there is reason in believe that it will result, directly or indirectly, in disposition of the commodities contrary so the representations made in this statement nr contrary in United States Export Regulations. Name uf purchaser flew, if diOrerut than come in Item I Signature uf official ul firm. (See io,i,n,i,00u iofrmoi ,,/fiee, Nnmr and title of prrcun c/going this docomrnt 11. CERTIFICATION FOR USE OF U.S. EXPORTER in certifying that any cnrrrction, addi;inn, or alieratio~s on this form was made prior tn the signing by she ultimate consigner nr purchaser in Items 9 or 10. We certify ihat no correction, addition, or alirratinn was made on this form by us after the form was signed by the (ultimate con- signer) (purchaser). TYPE OR SIGN HERE Name of rxpneiee Gem Sigxatuer nf presun aoihueicrd a vieiify foe ruportie tYPE OP Dote signed Noon and slur of prison s,gn,ng The inking of nny false statentent, ha toniralntont of ney inoterinl fntt, or Rn/lam to fIle taqoitad infnenntinn snap resalE in dan/al of pantintpntintt in Un/tad Status anpatta. Notariel or Oouotn,nnntnl nettifltntion is not teqainad. PAGENO="0353" 785 FREE-WORLD TRADE WITH COMMUNIST AREAS, 1965-66 [Dollar amounts in millionsi Total East- Eastern Period em Europe and Com- munist Asia I Eastern Europe Europe excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Communist China Free-world exports (free on board): 1965 1966 2 Percentage change Free-world imports (cost, insurance, and freight): 1965 19662 Percentage change $7, 667. 7 $8, 508. 7 +11. 0 $8, 097. 6 $9,047.1 +11. 7 $6, 296. 3 $6, 967. 0 +10. 7 $6, 538. 8 $7,166.3 +9.6 $3, 546. 9 $4, 198. 2 +18. 4 $3, 590. 2 $3,990.8 +11. 2 $2, 749.4 $2, 768.8 +. 7 $2,948.7 $3,175.4 +7. 7 $1, 306.6 $1,494.4 +14.4 $1,503.5 $1,811.3 +20. 5 lIncludes trade with Outer Mongolia, North Korea, and North Vietnam, where data are available. 2 Preliminary and incomplete. General Note: Unless otherwise noted, the term "Communist areas" includes the following: Eastern Europe-Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Soviet Zone of Germany, Hungary, Poland, Rumania, and the U.S.S.R.; Asia-Communist China, for which data since 1949 refer (as far as possible) to mainland China, Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, and Tibet; Outer Mongolia; North Korea, beginning 1951; North Vietnam, beginning 1955. For purposes of this report, the term "free world" includes Yugoslavia and Cuba. Source for all tables: International Trade Analysis Division, Bureau of International Commerce, U.S. Department of Commerce~ Billions of U.S. Dollars TRADE OF THE USSR-1913-1965 3.0 1.3 FREE WORLD - EL65 TRADE 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 Chart 1 16.2 12.5 - 10.0 - 7.5 - 5.0 - TOTAL TRADE 6.5 2.5 0 COMMUNIST TRADE Li~5i2~ 1913 1920 1925 1930 1935 97-627 O-68-pt. 2-23 PAGENO="0354" 786 Chart 2 DISTRIBUTION OF THE TRADE OF EASTERN EUROPE Millions of U S Dollars 8419 8,108 7670 7,831 4,467 ~ ~I EXPORTS IMPORTS 3280 3121 2160 2 189 ~ I-.--- coMMu!Isr ~ 2 326 3 486 3523 1950 1955 1960 1965 Chart 3 TRADE OF EASTERN EUROPE, EXCLUDING SOVIET ZONE OF GERMANY, 2,582 2.727 WITH THE FREE WORLD Millions of 1965 Dollars 2.135 ,91 1OTHER _______ 216 :*:..:::~;, 66 U. S. ____ j120 02 *... 1670 OTHER EXPORTS us:". *1 :, .*.* 1IND WEST IMPORTS 98 1041 1 69 NO WEST 928 13 ~ 1938 1955 1965 PAGENO="0355" 787 TOTAL FREE-WORLD TRADE AND FREE-WORLD TRADE WITH EASTERN EUROPEAN AREAS, 1947-65 [Dollar amounts in millionsi Period Total world Total to Eastern Europe1 - Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R. Outer Mongolia Value Percent of world FREE-WORLD EXPORTS 1947 $48,600 $1,333.5 2.7 $856.5 $077.0 1948 54, 400 1, 434. 2 2. 6 900. 7 533. 5 1949 55,100 1,342.6 2.4 914.2 428.4 1950 56, 700 1, 092. 7 1. 9 791. 6 301. 1 1951 76,900 1,242.3 1.6 854.8 387.5 1952 74,100 1,165.7 1.6 682.4 483.3 1953 74,900 1,101.4 1.5 677.9 423.5 (2) 1954 77, 600 1,472.7 1.9 896.0 576.7 (2) 1955 84,600 1,770.6 2.1 1,158.1 612.5 (2) 1956 94, 000 2, 126. 5 2. 3 1, 327. 3 799. 2 (2) 1957 100,900 2, 584. 1 2. 6 1, 567. 2 1, 016. 9 0. 1 1958 96, 100 2, 647. 0 2. 8 1,634. 1 1, 012. 9 (2) 19593 101,800 3,003.2 3.0 1,854.0 1,149.2 .2 19603 114, 000 3, 738. 4 3. 3 2, 174. 0 1, 564. 4 . 1 1961 3 119,200 4, 198. 2 3. 5 2, 372. 6 1, 825. 6 . 3 1962 3 125, 300 4, 471. 8 3. 6 2, 454. 0 2, 017. 8 . 6 19633 136, 100 4, 786. 8 3. 5 2, 675. 0 2, 111. 8 . 7 19643 153, 300 5, 729. 0 3. 7 3, 147. 3 2, 581. 7 - 8 1965 3 4 166, 200 6, 234. 4 3. 8 3, 531. 3 2, 703. 1 1. 1 FREE-WORLD IMPORTS 1947 $53, 300 $1, 006. 8 1. 9 $732. 9 $273. 9 1948 60, 000 1, 519. 7 2. 5 1, 026. 0 493. 7 1949 60,100 1,370.6 2.3 1,089.9 280.7 1950 59, 200 1, 192. 3 2. 0 940. 0 252. 3 1951 81, 600 1, 358. 1 1. 7 967. 5 390. 6 0. 2 1952 80, 400 1, 262. 9 1. 6 794.6 468. 3 3. 1 1953 76, 600 1, 189. 7 1. 6 807.9 381. 8 8. 7 1954 79, 700 1, 455. 9 1. 8 955. 5 500. 4 6. 9 1955 89 400 1,938.0 2.2 1,284.1 653.9 9.8 1956 98, 700 2, 305. 6 2. 3 1, 473. 0 832. 6 7. 2 1957 108, 500 2, 562. 1 2. 4 1, 520. 2 1, 041. 9 4. 3 1958 101,500 2,736.0 2.7 1,690.5 1,045.5 4. 5 1959 107, 100 3, 039. 5 2. 8 1, 795, 3 1, 244.2 7. 4 1960 120, 000 3, 661. 0 3. 0 2, 145. 9 1, 515. 1 3. 0 1961 125,200 4, 225. 6 3.4 2, 367. 3 1, 858. 3 4. 1 1962 133,200 4, 684. 0 3. 5 2, 491. 8 2, 192. 2 5. 2 1963 144,400 5,255.0 3.6 2,821.0 2,428.0 5.3 1964 161,700 5, 714. 7 3. 5 3, 178. 6 2, 536. 1 5. 8 1965 4 175, 600 6, 324. 8 3. 6 3, 497. 7 2, 827. 1 7. 6 I Excludes trade dith Outer Mongolia. 2 Less than $50,000. 3 Beginning 1959, free-world exports to Eastern Europe exclude reexports from Hong Kong. Preliminary. Source for world totals: International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics. Note: Figures for trade with Eastern Europe are compilations of unadjusted data, as reported by free-world countriesi Imports from Eastern Europe include figures for some free-world countries which are valued f.o.b., and are therefore no. comparable with world totals. PAGENO="0356" TRADE OF FREE-WORLD AND COCOM COUNTRIES WITH COMMUNIST AREAS, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1952, 1959, AND 1961-65 [Dollar amounts in millionsj Trade by years with- Free world Total value 1 Exports to Eastern Europe and Communist Asia Imports from Eastern Europe and Communist Asia All COCOM countries European COC OM countries Free world Total value All COCOM countries European COCO M countries Value Percent of total value Value Percent of total value Value Percent of total value Value Percent of total value Eastern Europe and Communist Asia: 2 1947 $2, 005. 7 $1, 268. 5 63. 2 $494. 2 24. 6 $1,424.7 $683. 4 48. 2 $448. 3 31. 5 ~ 1948 1,968. 5 940. 9 47. 8 487. 9 24. 8 2, 008. 0 1, 014. 7 50. 5 744. 1 37. 1 1950 1, 544. 8 636. 2 41. 2 537. 2 34. 8 1, 727. 0 997. 9 57. 8 716. 8 41. 5 1952 1,438. 2 545. 4 37.9 542. 9 37. 7 1,633. 9 785. 9 48. 1 692. 0 42. 4 1959 3,669. 1 1, 853. 4 50. 5 1,687. 5 46. 0 3,762. 8 1,954.9 52. 0 1,779. 6 47. 3 1961 4,966. 6 2,489.9 50. 1 2,038. 8 41. 1 4,987. 1 2,484. 8 49. 8 2, 164. 1 43. 4 1962 5,172.2 2,616.9 50.6 2,096.3 40.5 5,517.8 2,601.8 47.2 2,273.0 41.2 1963 5, 622. 1 2,761. 6 49. 1 2,086. 6 36. 8 6,240.6 2,924. 0 46. 9 2, 540. 4 40. 7 1964 6, 810. 3 3, 514. 1 51. 6 2, 219. 6 32. 6 7, 024. 8 3,244. 0 46. 2 2,663. 2 37. 9 1965 7, 556. 6 3,674. 1 48.6 2,676. 6 35. 4 37, 856. 4 3, 883. 3 49. 4 3, 162. 7 40. 3 Eastern Europe: 1947 1, 333. 5 785. 8 58. 9 410. 2 30. 8 1, 006. 8 504. 4 50. 1 390. 3 38. 8 1948 1,434.2 576. 2 40.2 429. 8 30. 0 1,519.7 810. 1 53. 3 688. 5 45. 3 1950 1, 092.7 533. 4 48. 8 502. 4 46. 0 1, 192. 3 732. 0 61. 4 641. 6 53. 8 1952 1,165.7 519.7 44.6 517.8 44.4 1,262.9 695.3 55.1 645.3 51.1 1959 3, 003. 2 1, 505. 8 50. 1 1,350. 0 45. 0 3,039. 5 1,709. 4 56. 3 1, 572. 1 51. 7 1961 4,198.2 2, 175.9 51.8 1,871. 5 44.6 4,225.6 2,239.6 53. 0 1,972.7 46.7 1962 4,471. 8 2, 292. 4 51. 3 1,955.7 43.7 4,684. 0 2, 359. 8 50. 4 2, 102. 3 44. 0 1963 4,786. 8 2,428. 1 50. 7 1,902. 6 39.7 5,255. 0 2,644. 5 50. 3 2,363. 8 45. 0 1964 5,729.0 3,044. 1 53.1 2,043.9 35.9 5,714.7 2,811.1 49.2 2,430.8 42. b 1965 6,219. 5 2,981. 4 47. 9 2,347. 1 37. 7 3 6,312.6 3,308. 9 52. 4 2, 856. 9 45. 3 Eastern Europe, excluding U.S.S.R.: 1947 856. 5 538. 2 62. 8 316. 7 37. 0 732. 9 338. 4 46. 2 303.6 41. 4 1948 900. 7 448. 3 49. 8 334. 4 37. 1 1,026. 0 484. 6 47. 2 452. 6 44. 1 PAGENO="0357" 789 -~ ~-~)coc,C)~ ~ ~ 3 C ~ ~ 4C~OOOO ~ ~ ~ ~ c~d~rc~ c.E ~ ~ = ~ ~ ~~C%J ~ I- C,c~_a,_c, ~ Ja),-~-~r.-coc~J -~C~C~c~) ~ ~ ~ ~ o~r~ W ~C r- C~ `-C C) C) ~ ~C) C')i-~ Q r') r-~ r- oo~ C) c')U) C~J C) CO ~ ~ ~ C) CC~C)C)C)C~)'-~ ~`)C4(DcocOt-~ C,~OC'4~ ~C ~C,C,C,C,C,C)C)C)C)C) ~ E C) PAGENO="0358" (C CD CD CD CD CD CD CD C 0 p CD CD CD CD 0 CD CD ~ >< -w 0 2 c" 0 C,) C o w CD mm ~cC,~cD (~) CD CD ~ - OO~ 00 ~ CD ~ w H CD 0 CD 11 0 c1c~ t\~p 0 CD -1 0 -u w -u C~) -u C, 0 0 0 CD m CO CD ~ -1 PAGENO="0359" 0 -4 C,, z -4 0 C,) -4 2 0 0 0 C/) -4 2 0 -v -< 2 C-) C) 0 :3 :3 0 CD -4 C/, >< -v 0 -4 C', 0 :3 C,, -4 2 CD 0 -4 0 -4 2 -v 2 C) -v C-) 0 :3 :3 0 CD -4 C) C) 3 3 CD C,, mm -4 CD CD c m -1 PAGENO="0360" 0 C) 3 3 2 0 S * ~ 0 -1 C,) -4 0 U) --4 rn 0 ~0 0 U) -4 o ~0 z C) -u C) 0 0 0 --4 U) C) PAGENO="0361" REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON U.S. TRADE RELATIONS WITH EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES AND THE SOVIET UNION Department of State (793) PAGENO="0362" 794 NOTE: In his state of the Union message January 12, 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson said: "I recommend that you make it possible to expand trade between the United States and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.... "The fifth and most important principle of our foreign policy is support of national independence-the right of each people to govern themselves and to shape their own institutions. . . "We follow this principle by building bridges to Eastern Europe. And I will ask the Congress for authority to re- move the special tariff restrictions which are a barrier to increasing trade between the East and the West." In his state of the Union message in 1965 President Johnson had said, "Your government, assisted by leaders of labor and business, is now exploring ways to increase peaceful trade with the countries of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union." The Special Committee on U.S. Trade Relations with East European Countries and the Soviet Union was ap- pointed by the President to explore all aspects of expanding peaceful trade in support of the President's policy of widen- ing constructive relations with the countries of Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. Upon completion of its study, the Committee submitted to the President its report which, in the President's words, "provides a searching and bal- anced analysis of a complex and important subject." He added, in a letter to J. Irwin Miller, chairman of the Com- mittee, "It will be of great help to me and to the Congress and to all interested citizens in making up our minds about how best to use peaceful trade to help build bridges between ourselves and the U.S.S.R. and Eastern Europe." This pamphlet contains the text of the Committee's re- p~rt as issued by the White House. PAGENO="0363" 795 The Special Committee on U.S. Trade Relations with East Euro- pean Countries and the Soviet Union was created by the President on February 16, 1965. Its task was to explore all aspects of expanding peaceful trade in support of the President's policy of widening con- structive relations with the countries of Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. That policy was reaffirmed by the President in his State of the Union message when he said, "Your government, assisted by leaders of labor and business, is now exploring ways to increase peace- ful trade with the countries of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union." The members of the Committee are: J. IRWIN MILLER (Chairman) Chairman of the Board, Cummins Engine Co., Inc.; Member, Execu- tive Committee, World Council of Churches EUGENE R. BLACK Chairman, Brookings Institution; Past President, International Bank for Reconstruction and Develop- ment WILLIAM BLACKIE President, Caterpillar Tractor Co.; Director and Chairman of the For- eign Commerce Committee, U.S. Chamber of Commerce GEORGE R. BROWN Chairman of the Board, Brown & Root, Inc.; Chairman, Board of Trustees, Rice University CHARLES W. ENGELHARD, JR. Chairman, Engelhard Industries; Director, Foreign Policy Association JAMES B. FIsK President, Bell Telephone Labora- tories; Past Member, President's Science Advisory Committee NATHANIEL GOLDFINGER Director of Research, AFL-CIO; Trustee, Joint Council on Economic Education CRAWFORD H. GREENEWALT Chairman of the Board, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co.; Chair- man, Radio Free Europe Fund WILLIAM A. HEWITT Chairman of the Board, Deere and Co.; Trustee, U.S. Council of the In- ternational Chamber of Commerce MAX F. MILLIKAN Professor of Economics and Direc- tor, Center for International Stud- ies, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology; President, World Peace Foundation CHARLES G. MORTIMER Chairman, General Foods Corp.; Trustee, Stevens Institute of Tech- nology HERMAN B WELLS Chancellor, Indiana University; Former U.S. Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly EDWARD R. FRIED served as Executive Secretary to the Committee and JAMES A. HENDERSON as Deputy Executive Secretary. PAGENO="0364" INTRODUCTION FINDINGS Review of Our Position The Character of the Trade . . The Two Sides of the Argument . Trade as an Instrument of Policy Export Licensing The Question of Technology . . Credits Most-Favored-Nation Tariff Treatment Trade and Strategy Page 1 4 4 6 8 9 12 13 15 16 17 RECOMMENDATIONS 18 796 CONTENTS STATEMENT OF COMMENT 21 PAGENO="0365" 797 THE WrnTE HOUSE, TVashington, D.C., A pril p39, 1965. THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked us "to explore all aspects of / the question of expanding peaceful trade" in support of your policy of "widening our relations" with the countries of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union.1 Any useful consideration of the desirable degree and pattern of peaceful trade relations between ourselves and these countries must begin with the Soviet Union itself. The Government of the Soviet Union has steadily, over many years, by words and deeds, declared its hostility to our own country. The U.S. Government and the American people support the most powerful defense system the world has ever seen in recognition of this fact. Without this preponderant military power, it would be idle and even dangerous to explore the possibilities of expanding peaceful trade, or for that matter, of any peaceful relations with the Soviet Union. For the same reason, we rule out from these considerations any kind of strategic trade that could significantly enhance Soviet military capabilities and weaken our own position ~f comparative mili- tary strength. With a secure defense, on the other hand, we can prudently seek prac- tical means of reducing areas of conflict between ourselves and the U.S.S.R. Indeed, we assume the United States has an obligation in today's nuclear world to pursue such possibilities as part of its long- term commitment to strengthen the prospects for peace in the world. While the Communist threat remains, its nature constantly changes, because the conditions of men and nations everywhere are changing. Thus, our Government must be forever reexamining its policies, pro- grams, and methods to make certain that they are appropriate to the times and to the national purpose. It is now clear that the ties between the East European nations and the Soviet Union are neither quite so numerous nor so strong as they have been in the past; the forces of nationalism are growing. Between the Soviet Union and Communist China, sharp differences have arisen. There is also a ferment in all of the European Communist countries 1 It is understood that policies with respect to trade with Communist China, North Korea, North Vietnam, and Cuba are outside the terms of reference of this Committee. Our findings and recommendations do not apply to trade with these countries. The terms "Communist countries" and "European Communist coun- tries" as used in this report r~er to the nations of Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. 1 PAGENO="0366" 798 as they try to cope with the awakening demands of their people for a better life within the confines of a system geared more for military power than for human welfare. It is an essential part of U.S. strategy to resist Communist efforts to expand through aggression. At the same time, we know that the danger of aggression will never be overcome until the Communists change their view of the world and the goals they ought to seek. Through our attitudes and actions, therefore, we must aim to influence these countries toward decisions that stress the attainment of pros- perity through peaceful means. To appear hostile toward all of their objectives deprives us of the opportunity to influence the choices they make as to kinds of objectives or as to means of achieving them~ The possibilities of "peaceful coexistence" and mutually advan- tageous trade do not sound convincing coming from those who speak of "burying us." We know very well that coexistence means something different to Soviet leaders from what it means to us. Within the framework of a policy so labeled, they believe they can still pursue hostile actions against the free world so long as major war does not result. But they have found it necessary to change their view of coexistence over the past decade and the conditions of the modern world will cause it to change further over the next decade. Much the same may be said of Soviet motivation and desire, and that of most of the East European nations, for increased trade with the United States. This Committee, therefore, has come to believe that in a longer time perspective the possibilities of "peaceful coexistence"-in the genuine meaning of that expression-can be made to grow. We conclude this in spite of Soviet professions and not because of them. We are aware that the Communists have their conviction as to how the forces of history will operate and that they profess to be convinced that time is on their side. We also have our own conviction. We believe that men and nations function best in an open society. There are signs that pressures for greater openness within Soviet society are mounting. The reasons may be pragmatic rather than ideological, but they are nonetheless real. The Soviets want a modern and tech- nically advanced society. Their own experience shows that the build- ing of such a society can be severely handicapped by a closed and tyrannical political order and a rigid, centrally directed economic system. We desire to encourage the growth of forces in the European Com- munist countries that will improve the prospects for peace. Within these countries we seek to encourage independence from Soviet domi- nation and a rebuilding of historical ties with the West. In each of these countries, including the U.S.S.R., we seek an opening up of the society and a continuing decentralization of power. it is in our 2 PAGENO="0367" 799 interest to promote a concern with internal standards of living rather than with external adventure. We must look at our trade policies toward European Communist countries in that broad context. Trade is a tactical tool to be used with other policy instruments for pursuing our national objectives. Trade cannot settle the major outstanding issues between ourselves and the Communists, nor can it, by itself, accomplish a basic change in the Communist system. Over time, however, trade negotiations and trade relations can provide us with useful opportunities to influence attitudes in these countries in directions favorable to our national interest. Trade involves contact of peoples and exchange of ideas and customs as well as of goods and services. It requires the building of mutual trust, and good faith, and confidence. An expansion of trade would require from the Communists a growing commitment to international rules and adherence to international standards for re- sponsible behavior; it cannot be based on Soviet-imposed conditions or usual Communist trading practices. Trade and government-to-government negotiations which set the framework for trade can be means of reducing animosities between ourselves and individual Communist countries and can provide a basis for working out mutually acceptable solutions to common problems. A constructive attitude toward trade can serve as a counterpart to our national determination to convince these countries through our deter- rent military power that they cannot gain their objectives through aggression. Properly conceived and wisely administered, a growing trade with East European nations and the Soviet Union could become a significant and useful device in the pursuit of our national security and welfare and of world peace. In sum, trade with the European Communist countries is politics in the broadest sense-holding open the possibility of careful negotia- tion, firm bargaining, and constructive competition. In this intimate engagement men and nations will in time be altered by the engage- ment itself. We do not fear this. We welcome it. We believe we are more nearly right than they about how to achieve the welfare of nations in this century. If we do our part, time and change will work for us and not against us. These are the general propositions which underlie the specific find- ings and recommendations which we now submit. They are based on excellent briefings and supporting papers prepared by government agencies in answer to ques